Author Topic: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?  (Read 12527 times)

Admin

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So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« on: December 11, 2012, 05:55:48 AM »
We wanted to share this bit of good news with everyone. Seems our posts are doing quite well on the Dorje Shugden Facebook Fanpage! We will be tracking the likes, shares and comments of that Facebook post on this thread here, so keep checking back!

11 December
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18 December
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10 January 2013
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To read the article for yourself, click here:
http://www.dorjeshugden.com/all-articles/the-controversy/so-what-if-britain-didnt-want-to-meet-the-dalai-lama/

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« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 06:49:42 AM by Admin »

icy

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2013, 02:12:04 AM »
How long can Britain stand the "freeze" from China the superpower of today when her economy is at stake?  China holds the key to Britain growth plans. Cameron was forced to abandon a visit to China earlier this year after Beijing downgraded its relations with Britain after he met the Dalai Lama in May last year.
Keen to strengthen his country's bilateral relations with China, British Prime Minister David Cameron is all set to avoid meeting Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama at least for the time being.

According to British Chancellor George Osborne, who is leading a five-member ministerial delegation to China, meant to pave the way for an official visit by Cameron, the prime minister has no further plans to meet the Dalai Lama.  Osborne made it clear Britain was determined to move on from a row with Beijing over contacts with Tibet's spiritual leader, The Dalai Lama.

However, it would be interesting to note that in the past British Prime Minister had embraced The Dalai Lama after office.


Britain Makes Overture to Repair Strained Ties With China
By STEPHEN CASTLE / The New York Times

LONDON -- After months of frosty relations with China, the British government took steps on Monday toward reconciliation, promising to relax visa rules for Chinese businesspeople and some tourists and saying that it had no plans for more high-profile meetings with the Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader.
Ties between Britain and China have been strained since Prime Minister David Cameron met with the Dalai Lama in London last year, but two British delegations were in Beijing on Monday, one led by the chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, and the other by Boris Johnson, the mayor of London.
Britain is hoping not to miss out on economic opportunities in China, which other European nations are courting. On Monday, the pragmatic desire to compete for business took priority over political differences.
In remarks to the BBC, Mr. Osborne emphasized the growing importance and sophistication of the Chinese economy. "Many people think of China as a sweatshop on the Pearl River," he said. "Yet it is at the forefront of medicine, computing and technology. It's a very rapidly changing country."
Speaking on Monday to students at Peking University, Mr. Osborne said that while other nations have been wary of allowing Chinese investment in strategic industries like water and aerospace, "we positively welcome it."

A Chinese company has announced that it will be part of a group investing about $1.3 billion in Manchester Airport, and the British energy secretary, Edward Davey, said on Sunday that he was close to securing a giant wave of investment in nuclear and other technologies from China and elsewhere in Asia.
As Britain's relationship with the European Union has grown a bit more distant, the Conservative-led government in London has given higher priority to faster-growing markets elsewhere, including China.
Mark Leonard, the director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, said that a lack of coordination among European Union governments made them easier for the Chinese to play off against one another.
"Every time a European leader meets the Dalai Lama, there is an attempt by the Chinese to punish them," Mr. Leonard said. "Rather than having solidarity, what we have is a 'beggar thy neighbor' approach, where everyone sees an opportunity when another country is put in the deep freeze by the Chinese."

The advocacy group Amnesty International expressed concern about the diplomatic turn in a statement, saying that Britain should respect its "stated commitment to respect and promote human rights in the countries with which it does business."

Mr. Osborne's visa plan highlights a problem faced by the government, which wants both to strengthen its economic ties with developing nations and to restrict immigration to placate domestic public opinion, especially on the political right.

Under the plan, priority visas for businesspeople would be processed in 24 hours, down from three to five days now. There would also be a pilot project to allow customers of approved travel agencies to apply for visas in a streamlined way akin to that used by the 26 European nations in the Schengen free-travel zone.
Qing Wang, a professor at Warwick Business School, said that Britain had been "shooting itself in the foot" with its existing, more cumbersome procedures. Many Chinese tourists "shy away from Britain due to the perceived 'harsh' and inflexible visa requirements compared to other neighboring countries," she said by e-mail. Chinese students are deterred from choosing to attend British schools for the same reason, she added.

David Hanson, a spokesman for the opposition Labour Party on immigration issues, said that there was "chaos and confusion at the heart of the government's immigration policy."

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.
First Published October 14, 2013 6:01 pm

icy

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2013, 02:06:07 AM »
Britain has avoided the Dalai Lama for trade, tourism and Chinese Yuen to boast up Britain's economy.


UK eases visa rules hoping to lure more Chinese tourists
 

Oct 20, 2013
LONDON, England - Hoping to entice more high-spending tourists from China, Britain announced simplified visa application rules this week. The news comes as the two sides eased a spat over the Dalai Lama that had disrupted economic exchanges.

The announcement by the U.K. treasury chief, George Osborne, came at the start of a five-day trade mission to China during which several major are to be signed.

Osborne’s visit also marked a resumption of normal exchanges that were suspended after Prime Minister David Cameron angered Beijing by meeting last year with the Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader accused by Chinese authorities of fomenting separatism - a charge he denies.

Cameron was forced to abandon a trip to Beijing in April after China said he would not be able to meet with high-ranking officials. Some lower-level meetings also were put on hold. British diplomats say Cameron’s visit is being rescheduled, although no date has been announced.

‘Let’s deepen our friendship’

In a speech to students at the elite Peking University, Osborne emphasised Britain’s keenness to attract Chinese trade and investment in all sectors.

“I don’t want Britain to resent China’s success, I want us to celebrate it,” Osborne said. “I don’t want us to try to resist your economic progress. I want Britain to share it. “

“What I really want it to be about is strengthening the understanding between our two nations, deepening our friendship, working out where by working together we can improve the lives of all our citizens,” he added. “Yes, of course, we have differences, different political systems, we attach value to different things, and we shouldn’t be afraid of pointing out where we disagree. But let us not do it in a way that is not respectful of each other and tries to understand each other, and let us try to overcome our differences and work together in peaceful co-operation. Because ultimately we want the same thing - a better life for our citizens.”

The new visa rules

Britain last year issued 210,000 visas to Chinese citizens and they contributed hundreds of millions of euros to the U.K. economy.

The visa changes will allow selected Chinese tour guides to apply to visit Britain using only the application for the Schengen zone, which covers 22 out of the 28 EU member states along with Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland. This will make it easier for them to lead groups both on the continent and in Britain, which requires most Chinese visitors to apply separately for a British visa. Targeting China’s new wealthy, the U.K. also will start a 24-hour “super priority” application, and is considering expanding a VIP service that sends teams out to applicants to collect their forms and biometric data.

Under current rules, Chinese visitors need to apply for two separate visas: one to enter Europe and another to travel to the U.K. Critics say this extra paperwork has only made many Chinese visitors from excluding the U.K from their European trip.

And not only will they no longer have to submit a second application, but they won’t even have to get up from their desk. A mobile service will also be launched next summer. British consulate officials will actually go out to applicants to collect their application and biometric data.

British tourism officials have complained that the need to apply for a second visa discourages free-spending Chinese groups from visiting the U.K., meaning they buy handbags and other luxury goods in France or other Schengen countries instead. The plans to simplify Chinese visa applications have been welcomed by the British Chambers of Commerce. Adam Marshall, the director of policy, said U.K. businesses will “breathe a collective sigh of relief”.

“For too long, Britain has courted Chinese investment and tourism without facilitating the entry of Chinese visitors with the same vigour,” he said. “A responsive visa system is crucial to demonstrating that the UK is open to trade and investment.”

Osborne is just as optimistic. “Let me make this clear to you and to the whole of China, there is no limit to the number of Chinese who could study in Britain. There is no limit to the number of Chinese tourists who can visit. No limit on the amount of business we can do together.”

DharmaSpace

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2013, 09:57:17 AM »
CTA and the Tibetan people who opposes Dorje Shugden looks like you have made the wrong BET after all.

Your bet on enforcing a ridiculous ban and oppressing your very 'OWN' people is backfiring and it is not helping with the independence cause one bit. You are losing key allies, Britain holds a permanent seat on the UN, one of the 5 WORLD powers. Powers that have nukes. Which nation is next to surrender their support of the Tibetan cause?

Then on the other side the Dorje Shugden Lamas are gaining recognition for their work and support from all over. They are friendly and compassionate to many Tibetans and people around the world. Fighting a losing battle it is time to change your tune or get new spin doctors. 

Matibhadra

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2013, 03:13:25 PM »
Quote
Which nation is next to surrender their support of the Tibetan cause?

Tibetan cause? Dalai Lama's theochratic cum authocratic cause you mean, I guess.

Anyway, Britain did not surrender Dalai Lama's cause, just was forced to make its support less obvious.

Britain, just like the US, being under the full power of greedy banksters and mass murderers, will never forgive the cause of tyrants, because they are essential to the world as they want it.

Matibhadra

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2013, 04:07:56 PM »
Where it reads:

Quote
Britain, just like the US, being under the full power of greedy banksters and mass murderers, will never forgive the cause of tyrants, because they are essential to the world as they want it.

Please read:

Britain, just like the US, being under the full power of greedy banksters and mass murderers, will never surrender the cause of tyrants, because they are essential to the world as they want it.

fruven

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2013, 06:10:25 PM »
Is it the same situation of if your their friend we can't be your friend? Pick one? In this case they can only choose to have one friend, it is either China or Tibet, not both. They choose to go with China for economic reasons.

Matibhadra

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2013, 02:55:33 AM »
Quote
Is it the same situation of if your their friend we can't be your friend? Pick one? In this case they can only choose to have one friend, it is either China or Tibet, not both. They choose to go with China for economic reasons.

The British, or rather the banksters possessing Britain (and US for that matter), go only with themselves, because they believe that their destiny is to own the rest of the world and to exploit it for their own benefit.

Therefore, according to convenience, they associate with Tibetan disgruntled feudal gangsters in order to weaken China, but they pretend to give up these same Tibetans and associate with China if they have no other choice -- but still, openly or  surreptitiously, they will always support tyrants, as with Pinochet, the butchers of Bahrain and other Persian Gulf dictatorships, Rehza Pahlavi, Mubarak, the Israeli racist regime, and so forth.

brian

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2013, 11:10:47 AM »
I do not see any reason as to why Prime Minister Cameron would want to meet The Dalai Lama to jeopardise relationship with China. Why would Cameron want to meet up with Dalai Lama in the first place? As the Dalai Lama already left office and all His responsibilities to the newly elected prime minister of CTA. I suppose there should be a no brainer for the Prime Minister Cameron.

Rihanna

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2013, 10:38:34 AM »
I read somewhere that the two Ministers,Tim Loughton and Norman Baker who were barred from attending a private lunch with the Tibetan spiritual leader in the apartment of the House of Commons Speaker John Bercow minutes before it was due to start wrote a private letter to Mr Cameron in July, which they strongly protested about the way they had been muzzled, and complained about the tremendous pressure put upon both of them at the 11th hour not to attend.

They were annoyed with regards to the inflexible instruction and could not understand how the Government could impose a blanket prohibition on a minister meeting a religious leader in private in a non-ministerial capacity. What right does the Chinese Communist Party have to interfere in Western government internal affairs??

Rinchen

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2013, 04:59:50 PM »
It is obvious that Britain does not want to spoil their relationship with China. It is to a point now that people are starting to know that what the ban and the opposing about their own people are all not something that of value to be supporting of. People understand more now and they will be able to judge better.

If the CTA continues to say and speak at their free will with things that are not of real evidence, sooner or later everyone would know what is going on. Judging by the looks of it, this is going to happen much sooner.

icy

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2013, 12:35:24 AM »
In reality, the Dalai Lama’s world is shrinking, as China uses its economic clout to isolate him. East Asian countries – even those that once received him, such as Buddhist Thailand – are now too terrified of upsetting Beijing to permit him on their soil. Japan is the lone exception. The year-long deep freeze of Beijing’s diplomatic relations with the UK after David Cameron’s 2012 meeting with the Tibetan leader was a warning to other western governments.

shugdenpromoter

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2013, 03:06:34 PM »
CTA should have known about their unpopularity with the other countries government if they go on with the "Free Tibet" causes. China and their support to the world's economy is pivotal and will get bigger as time goes by. Not many government will do things or support causes which will strain their ties with the Chinese government.

If CTA actually put their thinking cap on, they have to restructure their policies, mission/vision or etc to benefit the Tibetans in general. No country in the world can stand on their own without support from other countries, what more an administration government who has been exiled since 1959. It is still not too late to change.

icy

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2013, 01:21:41 AM »
British Prime Minister David Cameron now ditches the Dalai Lama for Britain's economy boast.  Superpower China uses its economic clout to isolate the Dalai Lama with success.  The year-long deep freeze of China’s diplomatic relations with the UK after David Cameron’s 2012 meeting with the Dalai Lama was a warning to other European countries.  More countries are now too terrified of upsetting Beijing.

Cameron Heads to China Aiming to End Dalai Lama Row



British Prime Minister David Cameron heads to China on Sunday aiming to reset relations with Beijing after a row over his decision to meet the Dalai Lama.

Cameron's trip is aimed at fostering ties with the new leadership of President Xi Jinping and boosting trade, with more than 100 business people set to accompany him.

Human rights groups have urged Cameron to press China on promised reforms.
Relations between Britain and China have been frosty since Cameron met Tibet's exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama in May 2012.

But aides said that the trip was a chance to "turn the page" in the relationship with Beijing and that Cameron wanted the visit to be "forward-looking".

Cameron sent his first message in Mandarin on Sina Weibo, China's version of Twitter, this week and now has more than 101,000 followers.

"Hello my friends in China. I'm pleased to have joined Weibo and look forward to visiting China very soon," he wrote in the message.

But Cameron faced accusations of double standards after he used a visit to the Commonwealth summit in Sri Lanka last month to urge Colombo to address war crimes allegations.

"Given the deplorable state of rights in China, Cameron should pick up where he left off earlier this month in Sri Lanka, when he said he would 'shine a global spotlight' on abuses," said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

"The UK should have a consistent approach to human rights, which must include a forceful public condemnation of rights violations that can be heard by the people of China as well as the government."
The Free Tibet group said that Cameron "should speak up" for Tibetans.

Cameron's meeting with the Dalai Lama two years ago prompted fury from Beijing, which branded it an "affront to the Chinese people".

But the British premier said in parliament in May this year that London does not support Tibetan independence and that he had "no plans" to meet the Dalai Lama.

Cameron last visited China in November 2010 and this will be his first trip there since Xi took office in March.
The trip is regarded as so crucial that the annual Autumn Statement budget update by finance minister George Osborne has being postponed by one day to December 5.

Osborne visited China in October, coming away with a range of investment deals as Britain seeks to tame its record deficit.

Britain also in October signed a £16-billion ($26-billion, 18.9-billion-euro) deal involving Chinese nuclear firms CGN and CNNC to build Britain's first nuclear plant in a generation, along with French energy giant EDF.
The business leaders reportedly accompanying Cameron will include the bosses of Jaguar Land Rover, the English Premier League, Royal Dutch Shell, the London Stock Exchange and GlaxoSmithKline.

Cameron said when he announced the visit earlier this month that he wanted to "forge a relationship that will benefit both our countries and bring real rewards for our peoples".

He added that the visit was aimed at "opening the way for British companies to benefit from China?s vast and varied markets and preparing the way for a new level of Chinese investment into the UK".

The Conservative leader has often spoken of the need for Britain to compete in the "global race" against rising economic powers.

icy

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Re: So what if Britain didn’t want to meet the Dalai Lama?
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2013, 03:36:41 AM »
For ditching the Dalai Lama, DAVID Cameron bagged deals totalling almost £6 billion, which would create 1500 jobs in Britain to boost UK economy.  Not bad.


STRATEGIC MOVE: David Cameron is shown around the Bund in Shanghai by Lisa Pan, vice president of social gaming firm Rekoo. Picture: PA

On the second day of the Prime Minister's trade mission he welcomed the announcement of an £80 million investment in the manufacture of black London taxis in Coventry by Chinese car firm Geely, posed for a "selfie" photograph with Jack Ma, the creator of China's biggest online retail site, and hailed a treaty which will allow easier access for UK films to cinemas in a country which is opening new screens at a rate of seven a day. But it was the less than flattering assessment of Britain in the Global Times newspaper that created an undercurrent to the day. The paper's editorial questioned the "sincerity" of Mr Cameron's diplomacy amid ongoing anger about his meeting the Dalai Lama last year.

More cuttingly, it suggested China did not need better relations with the UK because it was now a diminished nation.

It said: "The UK is highly replaceable in China's Europe diplomacy. The UK is no longer any so-called 'big country'; it is an old European country suitable for travel and study abroad with a few good football teams."

Mr Cameron responded by saying: "I must have missed the bit about the football teams. I would just prefer to go on the figures.

"This is a visit that has delivered almost £6bn worth of deals. It is a visit that comes on the back of an 18-month period where we have seen more Chinese investment into Britain in the last 18 months than in the previous 30 years.

"And also it is a visit where we have seen very good, high-level, substantial discussions both with the premier and with the president - the premier who described the partnership as indispensable. So I will stick with the facts and the figures."

At Shanghai Hao Tong University, he sought to reassure students that there was no limit on how many Chinese students could study in the UK.

He also joked about the weekly "torture" of Prime Minister's Questions but stressed it was important to keep premiers "on their mettle".

At a lunch, he told guests how the Coalition was committed to working with China with "mutual respect and understanding" to deepen relations and remove trade barriers.

Mr Cameron rounded off his speech by attempting a phrase in Mandarin - "Wei shuang fang you li", roughly translated, "in both our interests".

Mandarin speakers in the audience described his pronunciation as good.

HeraldScotland reported.