Author Topic: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??  (Read 26271 times)

LosangKhyentse

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2011, 11:48:32 AM »
Ok, ok so this is gossip but i couldn't resist: I read this interesting news from another forum 9http://forums2.phayul.com/forums/index.php?/topic/19760-dr-lobsang-sangay-is-a-pure-khampa/page__st__20) which says that Lobsang Sangay is a "Khampa Lithang, whose ancestors like other Lithangpas are Shugden followers but he (Lobsang Sangay) left Shugden worshipping 3 years ago so he is now clean":

Another forum participant replied, "As you said that Lobsang Sangay is Shugden follower and he left 3years ago, why too late His Holiness has requested to stop Shugden practice almost three decades. In 1996 onward His Holiness urged urgently all the Tibetan not to practice because it is bad for the cause of Tibet and if you till wish to do so then do do not come to any blessing from him. Till there is more question arises whether Lobsang Sangay has stopped the practice or he has just pretended too. And I have never hard him talking about Shugden."

This is disputed hotly by other Tibetans in this discussion but there is a video (http://youtu.be/E84KXGkNE3c) where Lobsang Sangay does declare himself to be aligned with Lithang although of course he supports HH Dalai Lama.

If Lobsang Sangay was a Shugden practitioner 3 years ago and he has either stopped or is still continuing privately - this bodes well for Shugden practice in the future. Well, I am just indulging in wishful thinking because all this is just hearsay... but if anyone else has any other news to verify this, it would be very welcome!


Lithang is large region and has a huge population. There are many Lithang monks in Gaden, Sera and Drepung. They are Khampas and traditionally practice Shugden very strongly for hundreds of years. The freedom movement headed by Lithang Athar was the group that escorted Dalai Lama out of Tibet in 1959 risking their lives. They are called CHUSHI GANGDRUK (Four Waters and Six Mountains). This organization was very large and powerful recruiting very strong Khampa men in the thousands that fought Chinese aggression, very patriotic and very devoted to Dalai Lama. Their protector was Dorje Shugden. Everyday at sunrise, they would offer protector incense to Shugden with prayers before they did their work. They risked their lives to escort Dalai Lama out of Tibet in 1959 and many of them lost their lives with Dalai Lama and Shugden on their lips.
They were famous for their Shugden practice and commissioned Shugden pujas monthly and as when needed.

When they escorted the Dalai Lama in 1959, it took some 20 odd days, everyday before travelling, they did Shugden prayers. The young Dalai Lama was fully aware of this and participated with them. Remember, the 14th Dalai Lama has even composed a prayer to Shugden at Dromo Geshe's Monastery.

It is very suspicious of Lobsang Sangay to say he has absolved himself of Shugden three years ago when Dalai Lama had the ban in place years ago and speaking against Shugden decades ago. Khampa Tibetans have a strong reputation of being fiercely loyal. They are very devoted to their lamas, protectors and regional customs/heritage. So for Lobsang Sangay to 'suddenly' openly declare he does not practice anymore wouldn't guarantee he gave up on Shugden. It could be a shrewd poltical move.

Thousands of Tibetans have to go underground with their practice of Shugden or they will be expelled from the monasteries, their workplaces and be denied any small benefits the Tibetan Govt in exile have to offer. Something as simple as travelling outside of India for a visit to another country, you would need a stamp of approval on your travelling documents from the Tibetan Govt and if you practice Shugden they will make it very hard for you to leave India or flatly deny you. Yes, it is happening now.

In order for any foreign country to give visa to a Tibetan Exile in India, the Tibetan Govt in exile must stamp their documents prior. This is the procedure. There are many other injustices that are completely undemocratic if you openly practice Shugden. You could have studied for 18 years and ready to obtain your Geshe degree, but that will be denied if you do not renounce Shugden.

I personally believe Lobsang Sangay still has tremendous respect and faith in Shugden, but he must flow with the political climate at this time.

TK

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2011, 05:09:32 PM »
Just to bring up a previous thread -
http://www.dorjeshugden.com/forum/index.php?topic=1054

Beggar said "There's a new kid in town - since Samdhong Rinpoche is about to step down as the Prime Minister of the TGIE, Dr Lobsang Sangay is being primed to take over. (there are many videos of him all over YouTube, speaking on various political matters which you can check out).

I have been hearing from sources within Shar Gaden that his people have been going down to Shar Gaden and asking them to vote for this Lobsang Sangay as the new Prime Minister. "

I thought then and still now that it is interesting why they would even consider lobbying excommunicated monasteries who were Shugden practitioners.

In that same thread, Mana said "So far we have never heard him say one thing about the Shugden issue...

So...it could be a sign of better things to come for Shugden practitioners in the Tibetan community for this Dr Sangay, let's keep our finger crossed..."

Let's hope that this bodes well for the future of Dorje Shugden practice.
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vajrastorm

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2011, 09:08:03 AM »
This is interesting: the fact that the newly elected Prime Minister, Dr Lobsang Sangay, is a Kampa Lithang and Kampa Lithangs have a long-standing tradition of being Dorje Shugden followers and practitioners. The plot thickens. For we are also told that Lobsang Sangay stopped worshipping Dorje Shugden three years ago.

TK has also explained how the Khampas have been strong Shugden practitioners and also how the Khampas are also members of a freedom movement that had “fought Chinese aggression” and are “very patriotic and very devoted to the Dalai Lama”. A group of them had also “risked their lives to escort Dalai Lama out of Tibet in 1959 and many lost their lives with Dalai Lama and Shugden on their lips”. 

In light of all this, it is only fair and logical  that Lobsang Sangay, a master politician and yet true son of the Kampa Lithangs, would declare that he is no longer practicing Dorje Shugden, only three years ago and many years after the Dalai Lama had started urging all to stop the Shugden practice. Whether he is practicing Shugden in private or not , we do not know. However, I believe he has raised hopes in regard to the future of Dorje Shugden practice.

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thaimonk

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2011, 06:43:06 PM »


New Tibetan leader open to talks with China

http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2011/05/12/general-as-india-tibet_8462871.html


Associated Press
New Tibetan leader open to talks with China
Associated Press, 05.12.11, 04:38 AM EDT 

NEW DELHI -- The newly elected head of the Tibetan government-in-exile says his administration will be ready to negotiate with China "anytime, anywhere."

Lobsang Sangay also told reporters in New Delhi on Thursday that his priorities as political leader of Tibetan exiles would include bringing more freedom to Tibet and seeing the Dalai Lama return to his homeland.

Nine previous rounds of talks between China and the Dalai Lama's envoys made no headway.

The 43-year-old was elected by tens of thousands of Tibetans around the world last month after the 75-year-old Dalai Lama said he wanted to devolve political authority to an elected leader.

China occupied Tibet in 1950. The Dalai Lama fled into exile in northern India in 1959.

**************************************************************

It is highly doubtful China will hold talks with the Lobsang Sangay. If China speaks to him, it would acknowledge he is the newly elected leader of the Tibetans. That would be awkward since China does not recognize Tibet as a sovereign state.

If they do not wish to speak to the Dalai Lama, why would they speak to him? He has no actual power. He will be considered clearly as a Dalai Lama puppet.

China's grip on Tibet is complete. China has the whole world agreeing with them Tibet is an inalienable part of China. Why hold talks with 'leaders' of a renegade province?

Lobsang Sangay and the Tibetan Govt is of no threat or worry to China. China is just playing the waiting game for Dalai Lama to pass to honourable fields.

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2011, 10:46:07 AM »

It is highly doubtful China will hold talks with the Lobsang Sangay. If China speaks to him, it would acknowledge he is the newly elected leader of the Tibetans. That would be awkward since China does not recognize Tibet as a sovereign state.

If they do not wish to speak to the Dalai Lama, why would they speak to him? He has no actual power. He will be considered clearly as a Dalai Lama puppet.

China's grip on Tibet is complete. China has the whole world agreeing with them Tibet is an inalienable part of China. Why hold talks with 'leaders' of a renegade province?

Lobsang Sangay and the Tibetan Govt is of no threat or worry to China. China is just playing the waiting game for Dalai Lama to pass to honourable fields.


Can't agree more to the points you have clearly stated. On what terms would TGIE negotiate to get what they want?

If anything were to change, it'd be on china's terms and grace.

And if china were to change anything in regards to Tibet, it'd be something China will benefit from.

WisdomBeing

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2011, 12:38:22 PM »
Thai Monk was right. China doesn't want to talk to the new PM. It is interesting though that China says they will meet the Dalai Lama's people although the topic is limited to the Dalai Lama's future.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110513/wl_nm/us_china_tibet
China effectively rules out talks with new exiled Tibet PM

– Fri May 13, 4:50 am ET
BEIJING (Reuters) – China has effectively ruled out dialogue with the Tibetan government-in-exile's new prime minister, saying it will only meet with representatives of the Dalai Lama and will limit any talks to the Tibetan spiritual leader's future.

The remarks by Zhu Weiqun, a vice minister of the Chinese Communist Party's United Front Work Department -- which has led unsuccessful on-off talks with the Dalai Lama's envoys -- are Beijing's strongest reaction yet to the election of Harvard law scholar Lobsang Sangay as Tibet's new prime minister in exile.

In excerpts of Zhu's interview, carried on the website of the China News Service on Thursday ahead of publication in state-owned magazine "China's Tibet" this weekend, Zhu said the exiled government was an illegal group with no recognition.

"We have two basic points when it comes to contacts and negotiations. The first is that the capacity of the other side can only be as the Dalai Lama's private representatives," the article cited Zhu as saying.

"It does not matter who is the 'kalon tripa' (prime minister) of his 'government in exile', they are a splittist political clique that has betrayed the motherland. There is nothing legal about them and they have no qualifications to 'talk' with the central government's representatives," he added.

Sangay told Reuters in an interview this week that he was willing to negotiate with Beijing "anytime, anywhere," suggesting his leadership would not be significantly different from that of the Dalai Lama.

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning Dalai Lama said in March he would relinquish the four-century old tradition of political guidance in favor of a popularly elected leader by the Tibetan diaspora.

In giving up his political powers, the 75-year-old has made it more difficult for China to influence the course of the independence movement after his death, analysts say.

Zhu, whose department oversees the Party's dealings with religious organizations, said the only meaningful thing the exiled government could do was dissolve itself.

"Everyone knows what the central government's long-standing policy is: provided the Dalai Lama genuinely abandons his 'Tibet independence' stance ... we can talk about his personal future," Zhu said.

"The content of negotiations can only be about the Dalai Lama's future, or at most that of a few of his personal aides," he said.

Zhu said that he felt "regret" the Dalai Lama had "deviated from the good things he had once done for the country."

The Dalai Lama was still "the head of the political clique which seeks Tibet's independence, the loyal tool of anti-China international forces, the main source of social unrest in Tibet," Zhu added.

The Dalai Lama denies he supports either violence or Tibetan independence, insisting he seeks only true autonomy for the remote region, ruled with an iron fist by China for the last six decades.

The Tibetan government-in-exile, which sits in the northern Indian town of Dharamsala, fears China will use the thorny issue of succession to split the movement.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Ken Wills and Sugita Katyal)
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Mana

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2011, 02:08:42 PM »
Lobsang Sangay ready to talk with China, but China not willing

Elected Leader, Dr. Lobsang Sangay Ready for Talks with China

source: http://www.thetibetpost.com/en/news/international/1689-elected-leader-dr-lobsang-sangay-ready-for-talks-with-china

London: - The recently elected Kalon Tripa, Dr. Lobsang Sangay told reporters in New Delhi, today that he was ready to begin talks with China "anytime, anywhere".

The newly elected head of the Tibetan government in exile also told reporters that his priorities as political leader of Tibetan exiles include bringing more freedom to Tibet and seeing the Dalai Lama return to his homeland. Lobsang stated in his acceptance message that, "His Holiness the Dalai Lama is my inspiration and I will seek to achieve the ambitious objectives he has set for us," today he added to this sentiment by once again assuring Tibetans that he will uphold His Holiness' policies.

Policies such as the ‘Middle Way Approach', which accepts Tibet within the framework of the Constitution of the Chinese Government, but seeks out a strong and genuine right to self-government (autonomy) for all the Tibetan nationalities within China. In his speech to the gathered reporters he stated categorically that, "When I take over I will implement that policy (Middle Way Approach)".

The Tibetan government in exile has attempted dialogue with the Chinese government but nine previous rounds of talks between Beijing and the Dalai Lama's envoys have made no headway. Past meeting have been seen by the international community as simply China's need to be seen as engaging the Tibetans to resolve the issue, yet not improving Tibetans' livelihood and freedom. Lobsang is adamant that such discussion will once again take place, "From our side we are willing to negotiate with the Chinese government anytime, anywhere," the 43-year-old Harvard legal scholar said.

He is hoping for a more productive and positive set of discussions rather than the stagnant nine rounds of meetings that began in 2002.

Sangay is to be sworn in on May 30 in Dharmsala but will only assume office in August when the term of the current prime minister ends.

________________________________________________________________________



China seems to rule out talks with Tibetan leader

CHRISTOPHER BODEEN, Associated Press

source: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/article/China-seems-to-rule-out-talks-with-Tibetan-leader-1377623.php

BEIJING (AP) — China appeared to rule out talks with the new head of Tibet's government-in-exile on Friday, quashing any hope of improved relations between Beijing and the new leadership.

Beijing does not recognize the government, based in India, that until recently was headed by the Dalai Lama. It has held talks with the Tibetan Buddhist leader and his representatives in the past, but nine rounds have made no headway.

Recently, though, the Dalai Lama turned over political power to an elected head of the government, Lobsang Sangay, a 43-year-old Harvard legal scholar who won April elections.

Lobsang Sangay said this week he was ready to negotiate with China "anytime, anywhere."

However, in an interview with the official "Chinese Tibet" magazine, a top official for Tibetan contacts said Beijing would only meet with personal representatives of the Dalai Lama.

"That government-in-exile of his, no matter who leads (it), it's all just a separatist political clique that betrays the motherland with no legitimacy at all and absolutely no status to engage in dialogue with the representatives of the central government," said Zhu Weiqun.

China accused the Dalai Lama — and other exiled Tibetans — of seeking independence, though the spiritual leader insists he only wants greater autonomy for the region.

Zhu did not say if China would meet with Lobsang Sangay if he were to adopt another title. Previously, China has met with officials of the exile government in their capacity as the Dalai Lama's special representatives.

Lobsang Sangay was elected last month by tens of thousands of Tibetans around the world after the 75-year-old Dalai Lama said he wanted to shift his political authority to an elected leader.

Lobsang Sangay said his government would seek genuine autonomy for Tibet under Chinese rule by following the "middle path," the Dalai Lama's policy of measured compromise.

China claims Tibet has been its territory for centuries, although many Tibetans say they were effectively independent for most of that time. The Dalai Lama fled into exile in amid an abortive uprising against Chinese rule in 1959, nine years after communist forces entered the Himalayan region.



WisdomBeing

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2011, 05:32:22 PM »
Lobsang Sangay says that he will uphold the Dalai Lama's policies which implies that he will uphold the ban... however, he could just be posturing for the benefit of the Dalai Lama's people... and when the Dalai Lama passes on, things could change. After all, everything is impermanent.

As for this strange phrase :
Zhu did not say if China would meet with Lobsang Sangay if he were to adopt another title. Previously, China has met with officials of the exile government in their capacity as the Dalai Lama's special representatives,

Does that imply that Lobsang Sangay could be appointed as one of the Dalai Lama's special representatives and thus be entitled to meet with the Chinese government?

Politics make my head spin - in not a good way...
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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #39 on: May 17, 2011, 03:22:37 PM »
So there is going to be a 15th Dalai Lama? Interesting.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/banyan/2011/05/china_and_tibet

No way, Sangay

May 17th 2011, 2:13 by Banyan

AS CHINA gears up to celebrate the 60th anniversary of its annexation of Tibet, it has issued a stinging rebuff to the newly elected prime minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile, Lobsang Sangay. The winner of an election among Tibetans outside China, Mr Sangay will have a higher profile than his predecessors. The Dalai Lama, Tibet’s spiritual leader, has said he will withdraw from his political role, giving the elected leader greater prominence and responsibility.

So Mr Sangay, a 43-year-old fellow at Harvard Law School, has been visiting his electorate, most of whom are in India, and discussing his plans. He offered to negotiate with China “any time, anywhere”. China’s response came in the form of an interview in the official magazine “China’s Tibet” with Zhu Weiqun, a senior official in the Communist Party’s “United Front” department, and a frequent spokesman on Tibet.

Mr Zhu’s contempt almost splutters off the page, as he rants about “that government-in-exile of his”:  “it’s all just a separatist political clique that betrays the motherland, with no legitimacy at all and absolutely no status to engage in dialogue with the representatives of the central government.”

So that’s clear then. It would appear that the Dalai Lama’s decision to democratise his government-in-exile has made reconciliation with China even less likely. At least, under the previous dispensation, a series of fruitless talks between China and Tibetan exiles has lurched ahead every few months since 2002, usually breaking down in acrimony. Even that now seems too much to hope for.

But Robert Barnett, a Tibet expert at Columbia University in New York, points out that there is nothing new in China’s rejection of Mr Sangay’s overture. It has never had any truck whatsoever with the government-in-exile. The Tibetan side in the talks has always been filled by the Dalai Lama’s representatives. There is no reason that should not continue. Indeed, the Tibetan exile parliament, discussing a new constitution, last month approved a draft which asks the Dalai Lama and his successors, despite his retirement, to “speak on behalf of the Tibetan people, to explain and discuss their concerns and needs as well as to appoint representatives and envoys to serve the interests of the Tibetan people in any part of the world.”

By distancing himself from the exile government, the Dalai Lama has in effect met a Chinese demand. China could, if it chose, regard it as a concession. It could also look that way on the Dalai Lama’s resignation statement in March, in which he said that two pro-independence “political promulgations” he had made in the past would become “ineffective”. The Dalai Lama has long given up the demand for independence in favour of enhanced autonomy under Chinese sovereignty. China has always presented this as a tactical ruse.

China seems to hope that with the passing of this Dalai Lama, Tibetans, deprived of an internationally revered figurehead, will give up the struggle. So it may have been alarmed by the Dalai Lama’s remark at a press conference in New Jersey, America, this month, that Tibetans are close to “finalising” the process for finding his successor—his reincarnation as the 15th Dalai Lama. He said that all the schools of Tibetan Buddhism are involved in this. He seems in good health, but is now 75.

This unity among the various schools would be unprecedented—and  important, since it seems quite likely that the next incarnation of the Dalai Lama will be contested, with one candidate backed by China and one, probably in exile, revered by most Tibetans.

The Dalai Lama appears to retain the loyalty of most Tibetans inside China, too. The focus of Tibetan resistance since March has been around the Kirti monastery in an area of Sichuan province that Tibetans regard as Amdo, part of historic Tibet. Protests that started with the self-immolation of a young monk have seen hundreds of monks detained, two elderly laypeople trying to protect them killed, a continuing heavy security presence in the area, and the burning of books not approved by the authorities.

So, as it celebrates, on May 23rd, the 60th anniversary of the “17-point agreement” in which a young Dalai Lama agreed to accept Chinese sovereignty over Tibet, China can be confident that there is no immediate threat to its rule. But it knows that many Tibetans still resent its rule.

It is, for China, in some ways a peculiar document to commemorate. In it, China promised not to alter “the existing political system in Tibet”, a promise swept aside in 1959 as China crushed a Tibetan rebellion and the Dalai Lama and 80,000 followers fled into exile. In 1951, the political system was a feudal theocracy. Now that exiles enjoy the forms of parliamentary democracy, they find China no more trustworthy. China’s  leaders, for their part, find their political system no more appealing.
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Dondrup Shugden

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Re: Lobsang Sangay-New Prime Minister of Tibetan Govt in Exile??
« Reply #40 on: February 26, 2015, 05:22:07 AM »
When HH Dalai Lama retired as the secular head of Tibetans in 2011, Lobsang Sangay was appointed as the Prime Minister.  There was much hope among Shugdenpas that a Harvard University graduate, obviously having lived in USA would be open minded and modern enough to respect religious freedom and human rights.

At that point hopes were high, but what is now happening does not seem to reflect any deliverance of modern thinking with CTA, being lead by a Harvard Graduation.

This set my mind into thinking, DID HH DALAI LAMA RETIRE?  Food for thoughts.  Results are the answer.