Author Topic: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own  (Read 19291 times)

crouching tiger

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Nobel Peace Laureate Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility Toward his Own 

Recent events surrounding the Dalai Lama’s visit to South India have further shaken the very foundations of an entire school of Tibetan Buddhism and its discipline, thereby gradually exposing the Dalai Lama’s agenda and his integrity. On January 9th, 2008 he was invited to inaugurate a prayer hall for a large monastic community in South India. At this event he announced a “Referendum on the practice of Dolgyal,” and proposed a collection of votes on this matter.

Many of his followers believe that during this recent visit to South India a concerted effort was made by him to perpetuate his ban on the practice of ‘Dolgyal’ known to many as Dorje Shugden. Such efforts by the Dalai Lama unquestionably violate his own principals and aspirations for a democratic Tibet. It conflicts with the core values and ideals of any democracy whose constitution indicates that no government or person shall interfere with a person’s right to worship freely. The recent referendum in South India, the call for votes on the issue of the practice of a deity, and the deadline for gathering the votes (February 9, 2008) sets the stage for a perfect storm of division and discord within the monastic and lay communities. Must one’s fundamental right to worship freely come from a ballot box? Using this voting system as a guise, he and his administration have exercised and called for a ‘phony’ democratic process.

One must understand that in the Tibetan system, a democracy is whatever the Dalai Lama and his administration propose. Throughout Tibet’s history Tibetans have lived under monarchies and theocracies protecting them from the true nature and experience of a democratic society. Political and social change does not enter into the mental fabric of an average Tibetan. Power and authority is relegated to the Dalai Lama institution and his government with the utmost devotion for he is “God” and “all knowing.” This climate is extremely dangerous when thousands of simple minded people catapult one person and his government to make decisions for them. It is a system that reduces independent thinking Tibetans to a minority.  It is a scenario where one person’s power and influence are fed by the silence of one’s own people. Can freedom of religion occur without freedom of expression and choice? How does one exercise freedom of expression and choice in a society or community devoid of a “check and balance system” for those in power? A democracy cannot emerge, exist or function in a system where governments and leaders instruct their citizens. Splitting and dividing a people based on their spirituality is unbecoming of a leader who has become a symbol of world peace, harmony and tolerance. The “voting” on whether someone practices or not exacerbates polarity. A yellow stick for “no” to Dorje Shugden, a red stick for “yes” to Dorje Shugden. There is no stick for a  “neutral” stance on Dorje Shudgen. Has the Dalai Lama abandoned his acclaimed middle way approach to resolving conflicts? Can a semblance of a democracy coexist with a Dalai agenda and rule? Has any world  democracy or country called for votes and referendums on the issue of practice and worship? Is this hitherto an unprecedented event in history or ‘any’ democracy?  If so, it reeks of abuse of power, status and influence.  Freedom of thought and expression begins with questioning, scratching the surface and digging deeper.          

In the 1960's, the Dalai Lama decided in favor of progression for the Tibetans in exile and introduced the concept of democracy among his people. The Constitution drafted outline’s freedom of religion as a fundamental right of every Tibetan. It prohibits discrimination based on religion. The recent referendum in South India, the call for votes on the issue of the practice of the deity, and the deadline for gathering the votes (February 9, 2008) is against the constitution drafted by the Dalai Lama and his government. The right to worship and practice any religion is a fundamental right in any democracy. When the Dorje Shugden controversy emerged, followers of Dorje Shugden voiced foul play and demanded freedom of religion. The Dalai Lama and his administration adopted the position that Dorje Shugden was a ghost, a demon, a cult practice, and did not justify its inclusion in the realm of religion. This opens up debate as to what defines religion. Religion involves faith, practice and devotion. Does it matter what the object of veneration is? Politics is issue driven.  Religion and politics cannot mix.

It is immoral and unethical for anyone to politicize secular matters. No votes were collected or referendums proposed on the issue of Tibetan freedom. Yet, it behooves him as a world leader to dictate to a large monastic community, a proposal for a referendum and collection of votes regarding the ‘practice’ of a deity. Not too long ago a group of young Tibetans escaped from Tibet to become monks in South India and were denied admission because they refused to give up the practice of Dorje Shugden. When complaints of discrimination were made, the Dalai Lama’s administration shifted the blame on a monastic association stating that the association had developed a charter to disallow Shugden followers admission into monasteries. Do the Dalai Lama and his administration not have a moral and ethical responsibility to ensure  the right to worship freely? Or ensure that no person or group is violated of this right? How does a Nobel Peace Laureate venture so far from promoting peace and harmony in his own backyard? How simple is it for a Nobel Peace Laureate to create divisions and disharmony among his own people in the name of religion, to generalize a group as having  Chinese ties? 

The very nature of the agenda to use this collecting of votes to decide on the Shugden issue smells of manipulation, underhanded tactics and deception. For about 30 years or so the Dalai Lama and his administration have used tremendous amounts of resources and manpower to discredit Dorje Shugden. Great masters who in the past practiced Dorje Shugden and the Dalai Lama also went on to personally meet and talk with key Shugden followers warning them of consequences if they continued the practice. Now, after 30 years of negative propaganda is this vote valid? It is becoming more evident that this is nothing but a calculated and abusive attempt at the systematic destruction of a large school of monastic discipline. It is a ploy to discredit great past masters, their teachings, lineage and eliminate all who disagree with the Dalai Lama. 

The Dalai Lama maintains that Dorje Shugden is harmful for the Tibetan cause. Yet not one incident has been cited where this claim has been validated. The very fact that he has made Dorje Shugden an issue is what divides the Tibetan people. It gives leverage to the Chinese to further split the Tibetan people, and for others to side with the Chinese. On the one hand Dorje Shugden was key in ensuring the safety of the Dalai Lama during his escape from Tibet, and many Shugden followers gave years of service to the Tibetan people in the initial difficult periods of settlement into exiled life. On the other hand, it is becoming increasingly clear that the making of Dorje Shugden an issue truly harms the Tibetan cause.

This has caused unprecedented turmoil and suffering in the social, psychological and emotional fabric of Tibetan society. Those who once lived with each other in harmony and trust now live in paranoia and mistrust. Children attending schools begin to label and ostracize each other creating situations for being bullied or bullying, verbal threats, arguments and eventually violence. Long time practitioners are told that their practice in this deity is wrong and that their root gurus have led them on a wrong path, thereby shaking the very foundations of their faith. Teachers and students have severed their sacred bonds, and families are being split. In general an environment of doubt and fear has been created and perpetuated. This is not the doing of Dorje Shugden but the relentless efforts of the Dalai Lama and his administration in continuing to ban the practice of Dorje Shugden.

One may ask, why are then so many high Lamas supporting the Dalai Lama? When one is a Lama or a monk, one’s  life becomes very dependent on the monastery, one’s guru and the greater community. The Tibetan system makes things even more challenging. The questioning of the Dalai Lama’s word or actions does not exist. The  questioning of his authority, his word and instruction become unthinkable. Tibetans have lived with the notion of doing what the Dalai Lama wishes for hundreds of years. To go against that would be no less than ensuring a one way ticket to the deepest hell. Many followers are faithful to him because he is believed to embody compassion. He has become an ethical and moral authority to the larger world community and is a world leader.  In many ways Tibetans and others around the world follow him unwaveringly like the mantras they recite regularly, without knowing it’s true meaning or contemplating on it. Both the Dalai Lama and his administration ride this wave, and perhaps use it as tools to further their agendas. These tactics betray people’s trust and faith.

The Dalai Lama is considered a moral and ethical authority figure in the world.  He maintains that love, peace and compassion first begins at home, with neighbors, in the community, the nation and then the world. The question is simple. Does this not obligate him to promote and preserve peace, justice and freedoms amongst his own first? Does it not become his responsibility to set a good example?

In short the votes collected on the Shugden issue is unjust and the actions taken in obtaining the votes are illegal, immoral and unethical. This is in direct contradiction with the principals of Buddhism, compassion and tolerance. Buddhists all over should be truly concerned. Please lend your voice in ensuring justice for this oppressed group of people. Please speak up against community disintegration and societal divisions. Please support the constitutional rights of this group of people. It has become the moral and ethical obligation of the oppressed and those against oppression to speak up against this injustice. The time has come to scrutinize his actions and his government’s policies. 

It is crucial that we examine and question the actions of our leader, a self proclaimed “simple Buddhist monk” when he violates core Buddhist beliefs and values. Many are perplexed with his unrelenting stance on the issue. The Dalai Lama has stated that Dorje Shugden practitioners should go back to Tibet where China patronizes this practice suggesting a mass exit. Is he an angry parent banishing his sons and daughters from home? There seems to exist no moral and ethical responsibility toward his own.

The Dalai Lama endorses universal responsibility yet appears to be a crucial component integral to igniting and refueling this conflict on the practice of a deity repeatedly. Let us take off our blinders and start taking notice. It is time to democratize and secularize the issue of practice and worship, not politicize it.


three pots

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2008, 12:02:57 AM »
Dear Crouching Tiger,

I would like to ask if this is something you have published somewhere, or if it was written specifically for this forum.  It is very well structured and if you have not already published it I would encourage you to do so.

Thank you so much!

Dave

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2008, 02:20:29 AM »
I agree,please publish if it has not reached anyone else..

jeff Ryan

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2008, 03:18:44 AM »
Dear Crouching Tiger,

Thank you so much!

jeff Ryan

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2008, 03:24:29 AM »
Dear Crouching Tiger,

If you have NOT distributed this article to the press yet, may we here assist in distributing this to our respective local news paper? Thank you again for your work!

crouching tiger

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2008, 03:52:18 AM »
Thank u for your support and feedback. This has not made it to the press yet. We need any and all help in spreading the word and creating awareness about this situation.Pls share this with as many as possible including the news and media.

Dave

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2008, 04:06:57 AM »
I just sent this to my local  paper and the Dalai Lama Foundation based here.

If anyone wishes to be anonymous..I have set up a Gmail account for anyone wanting to use it.
It's my current email on the profile here,just message me for the iinformation.
([email protected])
« Last Edit: February 03, 2008, 04:10:29 AM by Dave »

crouching tiger

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2008, 04:45:31 AM »
These are crucial times and people rallying together like this is very encouraging Should I need to use your email I will ask you for the information Meanwhile if you could post this on phayul.com, other forums or do anything to get the. Word out it would really serve a great purpose.Many thanks.  May truth prevail. 

     

machig

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2008, 02:43:58 PM »
Even worse is HHDL using 'shunning'--

"Should the monastic community have any interaction with those who are devoted to "Dolgyal"?

Shunning:act of deliberately avoiding association with an individual or group. The historical punishments of ostracism and exile were forms of shunning. Today, shunning in an official, formalized manner is practiced by only a few religions.  Religious shunning is often applied to those who have been excommunicated

Excommunication A religious sanction that removes an individual from the ritual and social community of the church when that member has transgressed some law or regulation of the church.

This vote to 'shun'  is a most cruel and heartless punishment. 

As such, I hope some articulate soul here can use it, perhaps you crouching tiger, in further notices about this
spiritual travesty-- You Write so well, and to choose that verb is inspired.

And thank you to you all.
They are meeting in Queens NY today to formulate plans--trip to the UN, etc.

Dave, thank you re: the email.  I will be in touch.

Anything happening about this in Canada?

a friend

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2008, 05:13:32 PM »
DEAREST TIBETAN AROUND THE WORLD
BUT MAINLY TIBETAN LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES

I am truly your friend and I revere with all my heart the lineage of Je Tsongkapa and its uncommon Protector, our Buddha Mañjushri taking the appearance of powerful holy Dorje Shugden.

Please listen to this advice:

DO NOT TAKE TO THE STREETS.
DO NOT GATHER IN PUBLIC PLACES FOR DEMONSTRATIONS.
DO NOT RESPOND TO PHYSICAL ATTACKS WITH PHYSICAL RESPONSE.
DO NOT RUIN YOURSELVES AND THE FAME OF THIS NOBLE LINEAGE.

Quote
And thank you to you all.
They are meeting in Queens NY today to formulate plans--trip to the UN, etc.


TIBETANS FROM US, AND NEW YORK IN PARTICULAR:

DO NOT GO TO THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE UN TO MAKE A DEMONSTRATION, THAT IS THE TURF OF THE DALAI LAMA'S PEOPLE. THEY ARE GOING TO COME AND MAKE SOMETHING REALLY BAD AND ACCUSE YOU.

IF YOU TAKE TO THE STREETS, THEY ARE GOING TO ACCUSE YOU TO THE AUTHORITIES OF ANY THREAT AND ATROCITY, and YOU MIGHT END UP BEING EXPELLED FROM THE UNITED STATES, AND WHERE WOULD YOU GO?

TIBETANS, YOU DON'T KNOW HOW UNFAIR THINGS CAN BE FOR YOU. THEY HAVE ALREADY RUINED MANY AMONG YOU IN INDIA, THEY HAVE ALREADY RUINED OUR FAME IN THE MEDIA, JUST BECAUSE A GROUP OF BRITISH NKT BACK IN 1996 MADE SOME DEMONSTRATIONS AGAINST THE DALAI LAMA. SINCE THEN THEY KEEP ACCUSING US ALL OF BEING FUNDAMENTALISTS, EXTREMISTS, AND MANY OTHER BAD THINGS. IS THIS THAT YOU WANT?

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, LISTEN TO A FRIEND THAT HAS AGE AND EXPERIENCE,
DO NOT GO TO THE STREETS. DO NOT GO OUT AND DO PUBLIC DEMONSTRATIONS.



There are better alternative things to do, if you are intent now in taking action.
Continue on and on sending letters, particularly to independent journalists and intellectuals, professors in Universities, Human Right defenders. Go for the individuals, Amnesty and other institutions are useless. People can think, institutions can't. Even going to the UN is like talking to a wall ... try to find someone inside to talk to, but never go outside and wait outside in the street that something happens, it is too risky for yourselves and the cause you try to defend.

Be patient and keep writing. Both through the Internet and true paper letters. Here we can give you ideas to whom to write. Even local papers around the United States, there are hundreds of them. We can try here to find a list and post it for you to use it.

BUT DON'T GO TO THE STREETS. YOU DON'T KNOW THE SIZE OF THE DANGER.

With much preoccupation for you,
your
Friend

savetibet

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2008, 07:19:16 PM »

FRIENDS-

LET US STAND AGAINST INJUSTICE.  TOGETHER WE UNITE.  THIS IS NO LONGER OUR DALAI LAMA--HE HAS SOLD OUT HIS BELIEFS AND ABANDONED OUR COMMUNITY.   SAVE TIBET FROM THE DALAI LAMA!!!

maryjane

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2008, 10:18:31 PM »
Dear Mr.Friend - We are sure u are a friend and not a foe. Tibetans are living the consequences and know that the present situation is due to silence and inaction. Fear and paranoia prevents important  messages from getting out. It is now time to unite and not be fearful. There is nothing more damaging than the splitting of thousands of monks in the monasteries. Mr Friend, are we still going to sit on the fence when there is so much to lose? Your concerns about peaceful protests tied in with the possibility of legal repercussions are noted. This is up to each individual to consider or determine. This is  what true democracy is freedom of choice and expression. U seem very concerned and a genuine friend, pls give us the list of newspapers and contacts you talk about so we can  spread the word fearlessly         

savetibet

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2008, 02:22:51 AM »
Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
It's about getting out there and dancing in the rain.

a friend

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Dave´s email
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2008, 03:32:50 AM »
Dave, the idea of having an email for DSH supporters is great. How would it exactly work for the sending of letters? People should privately email you to get the password and then what? Is there a way to distinguish them in order that the recipients don´t think it´s the same person sending the same email?

A F

savetibet

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Re: Nobel Peace Laureat Shuns Moral and Ethical Responsibility toward His own
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2008, 03:52:12 AM »
"A Friend"

You missed the boat.  IT'S ALREADY IN THE PAPERS.