Author Topic: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China  (Read 15093 times)

DSFriend

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #15 on: August 27, 2010, 05:42:23 PM »
Wow, thanks for the beautiful images of Yong He Gong.

Yeah, I know about how scary yet awesome it can be to visit major Buddhist sites in China. There are sooooo many people. This shows us that the Chinese people are looking for something more in life besides the daily routine of survival. In fact, contrary to what some may think, interest and connection with Dharma is more prevalent in societies outside the big cities where attachment to the glitz of living is less.

Dear Shugdenprotect, I've enjoyed and learnt from reading your posts about your observation of Dharma interests and growth in China.
 I've heard very similar comments from a few of my friends who works in China that the people who lives in the cities are starting to feel disillusioned.

Are there much dharma teachings available online which are accessible  easilytl? Does the govt block online access to these sites? If so, do you know of any workarounds? You may have known already that there is a translated version  of dorjeshugden.com in chinese at xiongdeng.com. I was told that the starter kit from this website has been translated into chinese and made available by the wonderful administrator in xiongdeng.com. I hope the people in china can access xiongdeng.com.


Lastly, speaking of Dorje Shugden in China: Genzey (increasing form of our beloved Protector) resides in Wu Tai Shan, which is one of the main Buddhist pilgrimage site in China.

And just look at the growth of China especially these few months.

i'm excited but more so, curious and anxious to see Dorje Shugden being

Vajraprotector

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2010, 08:17:32 AM »
Although their effort is to be applauded for wanting progress in the monasteries, I am a bit suspicious of its "politically reliable" part. But again, the Tibetan monasteries in the past were also full of "politics" - we need not be reminded how Dorje Shuden arise in the "politics" during the 5th Dalai Lama time. And now, it's back to "politics" again with this controversy of the ban.

I remember in 2008, China went on a sweeping purge of Tibetan monasteries, including banning all worship at areas deemed to be major centres of subversion. Monks with "attitude problems", or who refuse to change their thinking in line with official demands, was dismissed or jailed. Abbots and other leaders who fail to carry out government orders to "re-educate" their charges was threatened to be replaced by the regime's appointees.
(more info here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/2463385/China-plans-sweeping-purge-of-Tibetan-monasteries.html)

Great to hear about the 'reform', but I am quite a skeptic when it comes to steering religion according to political directions.

kurava

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2010, 09:27:40 AM »
You are right, Vajraprotector. Politics is an inextricable part of life, be it worldly or spiritual.

A good politician with spiritual training and realizations will bring benefit to people eg. Asoka, Emperor Kangxi. A self serving one will use spirituality for his own personal benefit only.

If we check out the lineage of Dalai Lama, the politics involved can be made into a soap opera. So is the history of how our dharma protector arose. Now with skillful means the two highly attained beings of these two lineages are using current political conditions to benefit more people.

Only buddhas who can see into the three times can use such dangerous but powerful “weapons” for the spread of dharma !



Helena

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #18 on: September 04, 2010, 01:29:50 PM »
Interesting point, Kurava. I did not see it like that, as clearly and deeply as you highlighted.

It is true - if we possess the right attitude with spiritual motivation, then anything we do will yield positive results and bring about great benefits to everyone concerned and not just limited to a few.

As you rightly wrote, ONLY BUDDHAS can see into the three times - past, present and future. So, only Enlightened Beings can and not mere mortals.

It is a grave mistake to think that mere mortals can think like Enlightened Beings and hold the same level of motivation and compassion.

It is also a very grave mistake to think that Enlightened Beings operate/think like we do. Hence, we fall into the trap of making the wrong assumptions about their great deeds.
Helena

triesa

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #19 on: September 08, 2010, 02:19:11 PM »
I feel the implementation of reform rules for Tibetan Monasteries in China is another way for the Chinese government to have more control and say in the monasteries once these rules have been standardised. Personally I feel that one should never mix religion and politic

Yonghe Gong is truely magnificant! I personally had a tour in 2008 and was awed with the huge Tsongkhapa statue inside. Yongha Gong, built by Kangxi emperor, an emanation of Dorje Shugden, had brought buddhism to great heights under his leadership.

Again, it shows that Dorje Shugden and Tsongkhapa have been working hand in hand to spread buddhism all these while.

Cheers!


shugdenprotect

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #20 on: September 08, 2010, 04:28:41 PM »
It is wonderful to read the sincerity all of you have for the Chinese people in your desire and wish for our Protector’s practice to flourish here. As this increasingly powerful nation get touched by Dharma and have their Dharma seed planted and grow, pure Dharma may catapult farther and wider in all ten directions more aggressively.

Dorje Shugden is definitely good for China because it is Manjushri whom the Chinese hold with high esteem and are readily open to accept; they have affinity to Manjushri as reflected by the renowned pilgrim site of Wu Tai Shan where Manjushri is the “partron”. Manjushri Buddha is also perfect because of the prevalent ignorance in China caused by its history and certain policies…including the once child policy (which create 3 generations of sheltered individuals who do not know much beyond themselves and are nurtured to be self-cherishing and self-graping).

Wisdombeing, you are right that this site is full of valuable, updated and accurate information. It would be simply exciting if this website is available in Chinese so that millions of Internet-crazy Chinese can get their hands on more accurate information about our Protector and His practice? As DSFriend mentioned, we have a Chinese version of this website. However, the information is not as much. However, I am truly grateful that someone makes the effort to ensure that this spiritually thirsty nation has some access to valuable information that can contribute to a happier and more peaceful life.

Additionally, in respond to DSFriend, there is pretty tight censorship over Internet access in China. From my understanding, this website together with other Dharma sites are blocked. There is a way to get around it: using VPN. A few reliable VPNs are Astrill and Skydur. 

Triesa, I completely agree that we should not mix religion with politics. In fact, we should not mix anything with politics! It has a tendency to contaminate anything good and pure. However, after so many centuries, this “mix” has prevailed although we all know that it is “wrong”. Therefore, until a method is identified, instead of fighting it, we may need to learn to use it to benefit the Buddhadharma and sentient beings. What we must always check in on is our motivation or intention. You mentioned that standardizing the monasteries in China might be the eventual goal of the Chinese authority. Although it does not sound very nice and some of us may not “like” it, it may be what the Chinese people require.

A very good example is the Beijing Olympics and Shanghai Expo. Things are practically completely standardized. Why? Because this is what a nation of 1.8 billion people with limited education and exposure require. Therefore, with a standardized monastery system, it may be the effective and efficient way to spread Dharma in the long run in China.

Perhaps we will witness a Dharma revolution in the next decades with the start of the “coming out” of our Great King! Therefore, we should all make conscious effort to build our own mind so that we can use ourselves to contribute to a worthy purpose during this degenerate time.

Vajraprotector

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2010, 10:30:21 AM »
Just want to share a little bit about Yong He Temple, and some of the related 'stories'  that is connected to Kyabje Pabongkha Dorje Chang (previous lives as Changkya Rolpai Dorje) and also Dorje Shugden and how they have helped the growth of Buddhism and also the Dalai Lama's institution.

Building work on the Yonghegong Temple started in 1694 during the Qing Dynasty. It originally served as an official residence for court eunuchs. It was then converted into the court of the Prince Yong (Yin Zhen)- the future Yongzheng Emperor, a son of the Kangxi Emperor (who is said to be an incarnation of Zimkhang Gongma lineage - Dorje Shugden). After Yongzheng's ascension to the throne in 1722, half of the building was converted into a lamasery, a monastery for monks of Tibetan Buddhism. The other half remained an imperial palace.

After Yongzheng's death in 1735, his coffin was placed in the temple. The Qianlong Emperor, Yongzheng's successor, gave the temple imperial status signified by having its turquoise tiles replaced with yellow tiles which were reserved for the emperor. Subsequently, the monastery became a residence for large numbers of Tibetan Buddhist monks from Mongolia and Tibet, and so the Yonghe Lamasery became the national centre of Lama administration.

Now, Rolpai Dorje was recognized as a reincarnation of the previous Changkya Lama (1642-1714) in 1720 and taken to court in 1724, after his home monastery was destroyed by Qing troops in response to the rebellion led by Lobsang Danjin. Rolpai Dorje was later identified as an incarnation of the great Sakya scholar and statesman, Pagpa Lodro Gyaltsen as well.

At the Yongzheng Emperor's court, Rolpai Dorje was educated in close proximity to the prince who eventually became the Qianlong emperor. This relationship proved extremely significant; Changkya served as Qianlong's main Buddhist teacher and adviser in matters related to Buddhism, including art, literature, religious initiations and practices, and diplomacy. His education included training in most of the languages in use under the Qing, including Manchu, Chinese, Mongolian, and Tibetan as well as the various Buddhist topics suited to his role as a lama.

Changkya Rolpai Dorje was later named chief administrative lama in Beijing. Early in his career as administrator, Changkya urged Qianlong to grant disputed border areas to the Dalai Lama. Although the emperor refused to grant the land, he did follow Rolpai Dorje's advice in part, by granting the Dalai Lama a sizable yearly allowance. After internal political tensions in Lhasa came to a climax in 1751 with the execution of the secular leader Gyurme Namgyal, Qianlong officially named the Dalai Lama the political and religious leader of Tibet. Rolpai Dorje's disciple and biographer Tukwan Lobzang Chokyi Nyima (1737-1802) asserts that this significant decision was largely due to Rolpai Dorje's advice.

Big Uncle

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Re: Reform in Tibetan Monasteries in China
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2010, 05:13:51 AM »

It was then converted into the court of the Prince Yong (Yin Zhen)- the future Yongzheng Emperor, a son of the Kangxi Emperor (who is said to be an incarnation of Zimkhang Gongma lineage - Dorje Shugden). After Yongzheng's ascension to the throne in 1722, half of the building was converted into a lamasery, a monastery for monks of Tibetan Buddhism. The other half remained an imperial palace.

Look! Dorje Shugden has foresaw the importance of China as a platform to catapult Lama Tsongkhapa's teachings all over the world. Even in that early time, he has planted seeds of Dharma in the minds of the Chinese. Right now, when the Chinese look at Yong He Gong, they think of it has their culture and history. Lama Tsongkhapa is their culture and history. That is what Dorje Shugden works to promote and protect.

Hence, in the very near future when China becomes bigger, its history and culture will be widely influential. I am still amazed at Dorje Shugden's foresight to incarnate in China for the benefit of our world. May Dorje Shugden grow big all over the world and may billions meet Lama Tsongkhapa and practice his teachings!