Author Topic: The U.S. Withdrawal From Syria Is an Opportunity for China and loss for Tibetans  (Read 6784 times)

thaimonk

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 652

This is an article talking about USA withdrawing from the Syrian conflict, pulling out all its troops. This was first announced at the end of 2018 by Trump. China on the other hand seems to be filling the vacuum left by the US.

USA are spending too much money on wars around the world, Trump has decided to pull out troops completely from Afghanistan and Syria. The US is not pulling out of Syria because it has seen the light of wisdom, they are pulling out because the expenditure on the war on terror, cannot be taken up by the US budget. When the US got involved in Syria supposedly to defeat Daesh/Islamic State, they supported armed groups like YPG manned by Kurdish soldiers, that are enemies of their formal ally Turkey, so the situation the US got itself into is highly complicated and charged. The other military powers involved are Russia, Iran and to some extent China who are clearly behind the defacto Syrian regime, very clear cut strategy and to defeat Daesh and anti Syrian elements. With USA puling out Syria, Kurds are once again left in a lurch, an attack by Turkish forces could be imminent, many critics of Trump have called the US leaving their trusted allies in the fight against Daesh under the bus. Daesh core philosophy was Wahhabism, popularized by Saudi Arabia and a close US ally. A resurgent Syria, backed by Russia, China and Iran, could be a nightmarish scenario for US assets and influence in the Gulf, like the states of Israel and Saudi Arabia.

This is one of the clear signs of US is losing ground to whatever war, it is waging with China to dominate the world stage. US influence over Middle East the past 80 years has not brought much peace to this region, but more conflicts and deaths. With China now firmly in the game in Middle East, hope the Middle East could change its destiny from a place of war and misery under US hegemony.

Too bad for US. It is losing ground everywhere and this will be bad news for the Tibetan government in exile whose biggest 'ally' is the US. For the Tibetan leaders and their 'friends' who have been criticizing China, it is like throwing an egg against Mt. Everest. USA is sinking lower and China is taking over as the most largest economy and power. China's path to wealth cannot be matched by any other nation so far. More and more Tibetans will see their futility to 'fight' China when everyone is rushing to be their friend. Tibetan leaders should make friends with China for the sake of 6 million Tibetans in Tibet. US cannot help the Tibetans in Tibet. But China can.



****

The U.S. Withdrawal From Syria Is an Opportunity for China

By Mollie Saltskog, Colin P. Clarke  Friday, February 15, 2019, 8:00 AM



The announcement that the United States will withdraw its remaining troops from Syria has clear implications for many players with interests at stake in the ongoing civil war. Attention has focused on what the U.S. withdrawal will mean for the Kurds, and whether Turkey will be less restrained, or how Iran and Russia might try to project influence farther east in rebel-held territories retaken from the Islamic State. Noticeably absent from these analyses has been how the withdrawal would affect another great power with vested interests in the Middle East—China.

China has gradually become more involved in the Syrian civil war since the conflict started in 2011, a divergence from China’s traditional approach to foreign policy, which mostly eschews external intervention and promotes state sovereignty. A more hands-on approach to Syria was evident in August 2016, when Rear Admiral Guan Youfei of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) pledged not only increased humanitarian assistance but also military-to-military cooperation between Damascus and Beijing, effectively siding with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his international allies, Russia and Iran. Prior to this, China was a significant player in the conflict but mostly through arms sales—Guan’s offer represented an escalation of support and involvement. Although the extent of Sino-Syrian cooperation remains ambiguous due to Beijing’s firm denial of any active military presence, the cooperation has reportedly only deepened, with China supplying intelligence personnel, strategic advisors and special forces in 2017.

China has also demonstrated its interest in taking advantage of economic opportunities in post-conflict Syria, which the World Bank estimates to be a staggering $400 billion. Two-hundred Chinese companies were present at the 60th Damascus International Fair in September 2018, where they pledged deals ranging from car manufacturing to development of mobile hospitals. And U.S.-led sanctions against the Assad regime and diminishing Western influence in the conflict leave China with little competition. The reconstruction of the Syrian army will also allow China to increase its arms exports.

China’s economic and security interests in Syria are intertwined with its geopolitical ambitions. China is seeking to boost its legitimacy on the world stage by playing an active role in international conflict resolution and reconstruction. The U.S. withdrawal from Syria could allow Beijing to further assert its role as a key international partner in Syria and, by extension, further Chinese interests in the Middle East that can help China realize its potential as an assertive power capable of operating outside of its traditional sphere of influence.

China will likely be afforded a wealth of opportunities following the withdrawal, as its overtures to Damascus have signaled a willingness to help rebuild Syria’s infrastructure, decimated by nearly a decade of civil war. Beijing will have the chance to play a significant role in post-conflict reconstruction while solidifying its growing legitimacy as a major player in the region. Many of these opportunities will benefit Chinese economic interests and increase China’s influence in the region relative to the United States. But China also has a counterterrorism interest in Syria. The significant presence in Syria of Uighurs, a Muslim-minority population that lives in Xinjiang province in China’s northwest, is a major concern for China. Especially concerning is the possibility that some of these individuals will eventually attempt to return home from the Middle East to launch terrorist attacks on Chinese soil.

Chinese Uighurs traveled to Syria and joined a number of terrorist groups, including the Islamic State and al-Qaeda’s Syrian affiliate, Jabhat al-Nusra. Training and fighting together in Syria strengthened the bonds between Middle Eastern jihadists and members of Uighur terrorist groups that could threaten China, including the East Turkestan Islamic Movement and the Turkestan Islamic Party.

Returning foreign fighters pose a threat to China’s domestic security, and those that remain abroad could target the Belt and Road Initiative, Beijing’s signature foreign policy project focused on developing robust infrastructure throughout Asia. Over the past few years, Chinese nationals have been killed in attacks in Mali, Thailand and Pakistan. In 2016, responsibility for an attack on China’s embassy in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, was claimed by the Turkestan Islamic Party. These trends illustrate that China is being deliberately targeted abroad by transnational terrorist organizations. It is of the utmost importance to the Chinese Communist Party to protect its infrastructure and personnel abroad under the umbrella of the Belt and Road Initiative, and hardened terrorists with operational experience from Syria threaten the security of China’s most ambitious foreign policy initiative in the 21st century.

The timing for Beijing’s unprecedented 2016 decision to actively support Assad is crucial to understanding China’s motive and key objectives in Syria. In late 2015, the Chinese Communist Party passed its first counterterrorism law, which allows Beijing to conduct joint counterterrorism operations overseas. In late 2017, reports surfaced of the first PLA special forces, the “Tiger of Dark Night” or “Night Tigers,” being deployed in the port city of Tartous for counterterrorism purposes. China’s decision to side with Assad and his international partners in Syria should be interpreted as Beijing betting on the side it believes will be victorious and most capable of helping China address its concerns about militant Uighurs. The move represents a failure on the part of the U.S. to engage China in international counterterrorism cooperation. What is more, the U.S. withdrawal from Syria will allow China to use its new counterterrorism policy as a foothold to increase its influence in the region and beyond.

Over the past two decades, the United States has damaged its reputation by spending trillions of dollars on its wars in the Middle East, losing thousands of troops and facing accusations of infringing on states’ sovereignty. China is now attempting to position itself as a neutral player in the region, following its blueprint of providing economic assistance in exchange for access to resources and strategic assets, including ports and military bases. China’s increasing involvement in Syria comes at an opportune moment—Assad could see Beijing as a preferable alternative to Persian Gulf State financing for reconstruction, and China may pour money into the country in exchange for control of critical infrastructure and significant political influence. At the China-Arab States Cooperation Forum in July 2018, China pledged $20 billion in loans to Arab states and almost $100 million in humanitarian aid for Syria and Yemen. Controversial tech-giant Huawei, a company the United States has accused of repeatedly stealing trade secrets, has voiced its commitment to redevelop Syria’s entire telecommunications network. China may also try to further enhance its trans-Asiatic economic corridor by bringing Syria’s Tartus port and Damascus into the Belt and Road Initiative. But for Assad, it could be a case of “buyer beware”—although development help from Beijing can seem beneficial at first, there are always strings attached when dealing with the Chinese Communist Party, as illustrated by the Hambantota port in Sri Lanka and the Doraleh Container Terminal in Djibouti, where China took over full ownership of the facilities once the host countries grew overwhelmed by interest-laden debt.

By supporting Assad, China has opted for a partnership with Iran and Russia in the Middle East. The United States, by its own accord, will be left out in the cold when it comes to postwar Syria. China has much to gain from the U.S. withdrawal and seems to be wasting no time securing its economic, counterterrorism and image-building interests in Syria. China’s involvement in Syria is emblematic of its changing foreign policy under the leadership of President Xi Jinping, which now involves aggressively filling the gaps left behind by a retrenching United States. China’s forward-leaning posture in Syria is also related to its desire to be taken as a more serious player in global counterterrorism circles, which is driven in part by its domestic agenda. The recent disturbing reports outlining the magnitude of “re-education” camps in Xinjian province, in which millions of Uighurs and other Muslim-minority populations are currently being detained, illustrate the government’s commitment to the “One China” policy and to cracking down on the “three evils”: terrorism, separatism and religious extremism.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war, Beijing has emphasized the need for a political solution that respects Damascus’ sovereignty. Its policy reflects the extreme pragmatism of its bilateral dealings with other regimes in the Middle East. China has demonstrated that it is committed to protecting authoritarian leaders by emphasizing the importance of sovereignty, with no concerns about liberal democracy or human rights. And it stands to benefit from this policy, with access to new development projects and a free hand to conduct counterterrorism operations against Uighur militants.

China aims to fill a practical vacuum of influence that the United States and U.S.-led institutions have neglected. Building and leading institutions like the Shanghai Cooperation Organization and the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank puts Beijing at the forefront of an alternative multilateralism to that of NATO and the International Monetary Fund.

The impending U.S. withdrawal from Syria fits nicely into Beijing’s narrative that U.S. policy is not the only recipe for success. The opening left by the U.S. withdrawal will allow Beijing to fold yet another state outside its traditional sphere of influence into its economic and security paradigm, while simultaneously expanding its own role in making counterterrorism a major pillar in its foreign policy agenda.

https://www.lawfareblog.com/us-withdrawal-syria-opportunity-china

aboutthetruth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 39
A more hands-on approach to Syria was evident in August 2016, when Rear Admiral Guan Youfei of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) pledged not only increased humanitarian assistance but also military-to-military cooperation between Damascus and Beijing, effectively siding with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his international allies, Russia and Iran.

It seems like China is allying with people who are in opposition to the US. Very smart of Xi Jinping. Instead of openly confronting America and declaring he is against them (which could damage the image/reputation he's building for himself), he instead allies himself with everyone who is already against America. A strategy of "The enemy of my enemy, is my friend".

Another example of China opposing the US indirectly is how they keep taking Pakistan's side by vetoing India's attempts in the United Nations to designate some terrorists on the international watchlist. India is strongly and traditionally allied with the US; by allying with Pakistan, China is opposing America in a very indirect way.

So why the contradictory move of China supporting terrorists in the UN, when they are the accused aggressors of the Uyghur population in Xinjiang? Allying Pakistan is definitely not about supporting a particular religion or anything like that. Insurgency and instability in foreign countries like Pakistan works in China's favour because they can step in as the good guy (like the article says), or they can force America to get involved in long, protracted i.e. super expensive wars and weaken their position even further.

Tibetans should wake up and realise that America's an archaic bull in a china shop, and all of their ranting and rampaging has led them to nowhere. So trying to gain favour with the US is going to get them nowhere. Gone are the days of the Cold War when the US could throw its weight around and people would be forced to listen. There's definitely a certain sophistication and elegance in Beijing's strategy that you have to appreciate, even if you don't like them.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2019, 11:34:54 AM by Admin »

christine V

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 380
    • Email
As China became more powerful in and gain more control of this world. Tibetan will be losing more opportunity to even return to their homeland. IF the CTA can't see this right now, it might be too late for them to return to China. It is really time to made friend with China, not become their enemy.

Alex

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
    • Email
China has been gaining favor across the globe especially in India. The Indian government had shown great interested in getting closer to China now and Tibetans are getting into a much difficult position with India. There was a leaked memo a while ago where the Indian government is asking their officials to avoid attending any Tibetan related events.

It became much more obvious when India ordered the change of venue for the ?“Thank you India” event from their main capital Delhi to Dharamsala which is much smaller. It is very obvious that India had chosen their stance between China and Tibet.

It is very logical for India to be in this position because ever since the Tibetans came into India, there are problems after problems that they created which is totally unnecessary for India. India has to bear the consequences for 60 years and now they finally had enough and decided to put a stop to it. Tibetan leadership needs to wake up and see the truth of the world that they denied for 60 years.

SabS

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 471
The tables are turning with China stealthily stepping in where the USA is vacating. China holds everything now, money, influence and power. No one dares overtly criticise China, except the US who are still in the delusion of their powers. I am amazed by the far-sightedness of the current political head of China who is able to manage such a large country and manage the friendships with other countries cordially. When you compare the Tibetan Leaders like Lobsang Sangay, one would cringe at how insignificant he is and yet he thinks he is the gift from God. Yucks! The exiles are certainly not going home to Tibet unless it is through their own efforts. Too bad! China has and still is pumping so much money and effort into Tibet to bring prosperity and stability for people. Wrong choice Lobsang Sangay!

Alex

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
    • Email
The tables are turning with China stealthily stepping in where the USA is vacating. China holds everything now, money, influence and power. No one dares overtly criticise China, except the US who are still in the delusion of their powers. I am amazed by the far-sightedness of the current political head of China who is able to manage such a large country and manage the friendships with other countries cordially. When you compare the Tibetan Leaders like Lobsang Sangay, one would cringe at how insignificant he is and yet he thinks he is the gift from God. Yucks! The exiles are certainly not going home to Tibet unless it is through their own efforts. Too bad! China has and still is pumping so much money and effort into Tibet to bring prosperity and stability for people. Wrong choice Lobsang Sangay!

China has worked it's way up to one of the most powerful countries in the world and it is amazing that they can do it without the major powers in the west noticing. By the time the US noticed what an unstoppable force China has become, it is too late for them to do anything. It is amazing on how the leaders of China managed to achieve such a remarkable growth over the years.

In the meantime, Tibetan leadership still playing their game of blaming China for their failures since 1959. They have achieved nothing over the span of 60 years and there is little to no progress on the cause that they are so passionate about, the Tibetan cause.

There is no way the Tibetan leadership will be able to get back Tibet from China now. They are unable to do so 60 years ago when China is still weak, they will definitely unable to do so now when China is at it's prime. They have missed the boat and that is why His Holiness the Dalai Lama changed his plans from Rangzen to Umaylam. There is a reason for the change and Dalai Lama is wise to have changed his direction. However, it is a shame that Umaylam did not get much support from the delusional Tibetans who think that they still stand a chance in getting back Tibet.



Rowntree

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
So why the contradictory move of China supporting terrorists in the UN, when they are the accused aggressors of the Uyghur population in Xinjiang? Allying Pakistan is definitely not about supporting a particular religion or anything like that. Insurgency and instability in foreign countries like Pakistan works in China's favour because they can step in as the good guy (like the article says), or they can force America to get involved in long, protracted i.e. super expensive wars and weaken their position even further.

Trump has pulled the US out of the UN over "accusations of 'bias,' protecting abusers." https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2018/06/19/us-pulls-out-united-nations-human-rights-council/715993002/ This is the trend of Trump. He pulls the US out of things that he cannot handle or manage or he sees no benefits in. Due to the lack of politic knowledge and experience, he has made the US felt into a worsening situation that has started by George Bush. This has caused Barack Obama having to spend 8 years to clear up his mess - the war in Iraq among all. All the efforts had gone into waste with Trump coming into office.

We see him being flippant and unreliable with the deals he made with China, creating the trade war that further jeopardizes the already weak economy in the US. When things do not go his way, he just drops them like trash. He is basically abusing his power as one of the most powerful leaders in the world. He can save many lives, end poverty and hunger, and much more with his power. Unfortunately, this is not the case.

China is basically rising in the world stage at the right time where Trump provided all conditions for them to take over. Of course, the Chinese have worked really hard to be where they are. They deserve to be where they are because they really put efforts into growing their country, develop Tibet and lifting them out of poverty, initiating the BRI in the world, and etc.

Looking at how unstable Trump is, and therefore the US, wouldn't it a smart move to befriend with China? The Central Tibetan Administration should really move forward for the sake of the Dalai Lama's welfare and the Tibetans in exile. They need growth.

Alex

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
    • Email
The US is not as powerful as they are currently and China will be the next superpower of the world soon when it will become the world's most powerful country thanks it is superb leadership. The US has been trying to prevent that from happening but they failed miserably. The US is jealous of China and they are trying to delay the process.

Instead of getting jealous of what China is becoming, why don't the US bulk up and step up their game? What use is there to temporarily stop China from achieving what it wants to achieve because they will achieve their goal eventually.

They should make friends with China and perhaps they can make use of China to grow as well since China is not being difficult and they are willing to collaborate on so many projects. It can be a win-win situation and all US needs to do is to be less arrogant and be nice to China especially on the trade war.