Author Topic: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa  (Read 84241 times)

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #165 on: March 23, 2013, 01:51:52 AM »
China sentences Tibetans up to six years


DHARAMSHALA, March 21: In connection with the self-immolation protest, Chinese court in Qinghai (Tib. Amdo) province handed down three Tibetans up to six years in jail.

According to Dharamshala-based Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, Tibetans were charged of “incitement to split the country” and invoked article 103 of the Chinese Criminal Law to punish the Tibetans.

The Intermediate People’s court in Tsoshar has sentenced Jigmey Thapkhey to five years in jail and deprived his political rights for three years; Kelsang Dhondup was given six-year jail term and withdrawn his political rights for four years.

A court in Ping‘an County sentenced Lobsang to four years in prison and deprived his political rights for two years.

In January this year, a Chinese court sentenced Lobsang Konchok, 40, a monk from Ngaba Kirti Monastery to death with a two-year reprieve and Lobsang Tsering, 31, to ten years in prison. On the same day, six other Tibetans were handed down heavy jail terms for their alleged roles in trying to rescue a Tibetan self-immolator from falling into the hands of Chinese security forces.

Since 2009, there have been 109 confirmed Tibetans self-immolations calling for freedom in Tibet and return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile.

It is also reported that on March 19 a number of Tibetans were prosecuted for their alleged roles in the self-immolation of Rinchen, 17 and Sonam Dhargey, 18, who set themselves on fire in Kyangtsa in Dzorge, Eastern Tibet on February 19. Both succumbed to their burns.

Ensapa

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #166 on: March 23, 2013, 04:25:09 AM »
Another doubtful/poor me story from phayul. Every time a story like that is posted, the chances of CTA getting Tibet back decreases by 50%

Quote
Protest against China's smear campaign
[Thursday, March 21, 2013 17:04]


Tibetan activists in Dharamshala stages a protest on “China’s victimization” of family members of self-immolators, March 21, 2013.(Phayul photo/Norbu Wangyal)

DHARAMSHALA, March 21: As a response to continuing attempts by Chinese authorities to blame and impose heavy punishment on the family members of the self-immolators, the Tibetans in Dharamshala today staged a protest on “China’s victimization” of family members of self-immolators.

The protesters paraded Xi Jinping’s bigheaded oaf holding a million Yuan in Mcleod Ganj and displayed placards saying Accept the Lie or Die! Two option: Either Accept the Bribe or Face the Punishment! I Will Never Accept the Lie! etc.

The protest was jointly organized by regional chapters of Tibetan Youth Congress and Tibetan Women’s Association and Students For a Free Tibet, India.

“The continuous self-immolations by Tibetans inside Tibet is one of the strongest political statements that highlights the height of oppression under which Tibetans have been suffering for a long time,” said Dorjee Tseten, National Director of Students for a Free Tibet.

“Chinese government’s attempt to conceal the reality by deploying heavy military and punishing innocent Tibetans or offering bribe will only further deteriorate the situation. Tibetans will not stop resisting until and unless China addresses the real issue of the Tibetan people.”

On 13 March, Kunchok Wangmo, 31, set herself on fire protesting China’s rule over her homeland around midnight in the Dzoge region of Ngaba, Northeastern Tibet. She died from injuries.

Following her self-immolation protest, the local Chinese authorities arrested Wangmo’s husband Dolma Kyab when he refused to comply with their orders to declare internal family feuds as the reason for her self-immolation.

According to China’s state news agency Xinhua, Dolma Kyab allegedly choked his wife to death after a quarrel and then transferred her body to the residential community where it was set alight on 12 March. Currently, Kyab’s condition and whereabouts of Kyab are not known.

Similarly, in November last year, by Chinese security personnel secretly detained the husband of self-immolator, Dolkar Tso, when he refused to accept bribes offered by local authorities to state that his wife set herself on fire due to to family disputes and not in protest against China’s rule.


icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #167 on: March 24, 2013, 01:43:43 PM »
 NEW SELF-IMMOLATION : Tibetan women Kalsang Kyid, 30, set herself on fire asking total freedom of her people, today, March 24, 2013 at 3:30 PM local time at Golok Dzamthang area, in todays Ngaba prefecture. Her remains were taken to nearby Jonang temple. Her father's name is Choeden, mother's name is Pari.

Ensapa

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #168 on: March 25, 2013, 03:50:56 AM »
And again, this is what happens to people who are related to self immolators, so how can it be that self immolation is a peaceful and does not hurt others?

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China detains a monk and puts monastery under strict surveillance
Phayul[Sunday, March 24, 2013 22:35]
DHARAMSHALA, March 24: A Tibetan monk from Tongkyab Monastery has been detained by China’s People’s Armed Police or PAP in Gade County in Golok in eastern Tibet earlier this month.

Tritsun, 26, was arrested by Chinese authorities on March 11 for unknown reasons. However, it has been reported that his detention may have to do with a book he authored and published in March.

Titled Denpai Khalang or Vapour of Truth, the book was released on 8 March at Tongkyap Monastery and contains essays on self-immolation protests in Tibet. It also has the biography on Lama Sopa, an reincarnated lama from the monastery, who died in a self-immolation protest last year.

Tritsun is a native of Gyagor Mema nomadic camp of Dokha Village in Gade County.

Dharamshala-based Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD), while confirming the reports about Tritsun's detention, said that he has been kept incommunicado that has severely affected his aged mother, Phagmo, who is the only family member.

“Tritsun’s detention took place when he was visiting his aged mother who lives near Tongkyap Monastery,” said TCHRD.

It is also reported that a large number of armed forces have been deployed to Tongkyab Monastery, which is now under strict surveillance. Deployments of police apparently began following a prayer ceremony held to observe the 54th anniversary of Tibetan National Uprising Day and 5th anniversary of 2008 protest on March 14.

The monks at the monastery were pressurized by Chinese authorities to voluntarily turn themselves if they had, in any way, morally or materially, supported or aided the publication of the book and warned against holding prayer ceremonies describing it as “against the law.”

The authorities “further warned that going against the law would result in the confiscation of IDs of registered monks. The fate of unregistered monks at the monastery remains unknown at the moment.” TCHRD added.

Tongkyap Monastery has about 200 monks, half of whom are officially registered i.e. they are approved by the Chinese government with special ID cards. Lack of such official IDs are not considered as monks of the monastery and can face expulsion.

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #169 on: March 25, 2013, 11:31:49 AM »
Second self-immolation in 24 hours, Toll rises to 111

DHARAMSHALA, March 25: Within 24 hours of Kal Kyi’s self-immolation in Zamthang, another Tibetan has set himself on fire today in an apparent protest against China’s continuing occupation of Tibet.

Forty-three-year old Lhamo Kyab set himself ablaze at Lushoe village in Tsoe region, Eastern Tibet. The self-immolation took place around 10 am (local time).

This is the fifth self-immolation protests in Tsoe since Sangay Gyatso set himself on fire on October 6 last year.

Kyab’s self-immolation is the second such case in a day. Thirty-year-old Kal Kyi, a mother of four has set herself ablaze yesterday in Eastern Tibet at 3:30 pm (local time). She died at the protest site.

The deepening crisis inside Tibet has witnessed large-scale anti-China protests in 2008 and a series of self-immolations since 2009.

There have now been 111 confirmed reports of self-immolation in the last five years. The overwhelming number of them have demanded freedom for Tibet and return of the Dalai Lama from exile.

Further detail about Kyab current status is not available at the time of filing this report.

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #170 on: March 25, 2013, 12:12:55 PM »

MP David Sweet addresses the House of Commons.


DHARAMSHALA, March 25: A Canadian parliamentarian, David Sweet, raised the issue of Tibet in the House of Commons on Thursday and called upon Xi Jinping to meet with the leaders of the Tibetan Government-in-exile.

“I would like to note that the world is now watching how President Jinping's government lives by those words and lives up to those expectations with regard to the situation in Tibet,” said Sweet.

He also termed the situation in Tibet as “increasingly violent and desperate”.

“Given this urgency, we sincerely encourage President Jinping to meet with the leaders of the Tibetan government in exile to discuss the Dalai Lama's middle-way approach for peace, human rights, stability and a reasonable coexistence between the Tibetan and Chinese peoples,” he added.

Sweet is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale and the Chair of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology.

On same day, Senator Sarah Hanson Young of the Greens Party moved a motion on Tibet in the Upper House of Australian Parliament.

In a motion passed in the Senate notes that the Australian Government must urge Chinese authorities to address the underlying causes of tension in Tibetan regions; end the use of harsh policies such as increased surveillance and violent crackdowns; lift restrictions on access to Tibetan regions, including for international media and diplomats; and resume substantive talks with the Dalai Lama’s representatives.

The continuing crisis in Tibet has a series of self-immolations that has now seen 111 Tibetans set themselves on fire since 2009.

Ensapa

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #171 on: March 26, 2013, 06:50:00 AM »
Hmm..this is interesting. Nepal doesnt seem to be happy or sympathetic with the Tibetans. I wonder why...

Quote
Nepal to declare Druptse’s body “unclaimed”
Phayul[Sunday, March 24, 2013 21:57]


Tibetan self-immolator Drupchen Tsering in an undated photo.

DHARAMSHALA, March 24: Despite repeated attempts by Tibetans, their supporters and representatives, the body of Drupchen Tsering aka Druptse, a Tibetan who set himself on fire in Kathmandu, the Nepalese authorities are reportedly planning to declare his body ‘unclaimed’.

According to Kathmandu-based newspaper The Himalayan, “Government officials are preparing to declare the body of a Tibetan monk, who set himself ablaze on the premises of Boudhanath Stupa, unclaimed after his kin failed to approach the police to receive the body.”

On March 9, Kathmandu District Administration Office had issued a public notice in Gorkhapatra asking the family members or relatives of the monk to receive the body within seven days from the date of the notice.

"After no one approached us to claim the body within the given time, we are preparing to declare it unclaimed and will either bury it or provide it to a medical college," The Himalayan quotes an official saying.

Druptse, 25 set himself ablaze on the path around the holy Boudhanath stupa in Nepalese capital city Kathmandu on February 13. He passed away on the same day after suffering 96 percent burns.

Since then his body has been kept in the mortuary of TU Teaching Hospital, Maharajgunj.

Tibetans all over the world have appealed to the government of Nepal and its embassies and consulates around the world to handover Druptse’s body back to Tibetan in order to carry out traditional religious ritual.

Earlier this month, Lobsang Sangay, the prime minister of the exile Tibetan administration, expressed sadness over the Nepalese government’s decision to continue to hold back Druptse’s body.

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #172 on: March 27, 2013, 02:18:08 AM »
Dalai Lama talks about self-immolation
[Tuesday, March 26, 2013 17:17]

A screen grab from Timesnow.tv
DHARAMSHALA, March 25: Speaking about the on-going self-immolation protest in Tibet, His Holiness the Dalai Lama said that “the ultimate factor is their (self-immolators) individual motivation.”

The Dalai Lama spoke to TIMES NOW, a major Indian news channel.

“Actually, suicide is basically (a) type of violence but then question of good or bad actually depend on the motivation and goal. I think (as) goal is concern, these (self-immolators) people (are) not drunk, (do) not (have) family problem, this (self-immolation) is for Buddha dharma, for Tibetan National interest but then I think the ultimate factor is their individual motivation,” the 77-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader said.

“If motivation (consists) too much anger, hatred, then it is negative (but) if the motivation (is) more compassionate, calm mind then such acts also can be positive. That is strictly speaking from Buddhist view of point. Any action whether violence or non violence, is ultimately depend on motivation.”

Since 2009 there have been 111 Tibetans self-immolations against China’s occupation. Overwhelming majority of them demanded freedom and return of the Dalai Lama from exile. Thousands of Tibetans have carried out mass protests even as Chinese authorities have increased their repressive policies and tightened the noose around self-immolations.

Responding to the question of China’s blame on the Tibetan spiritual leader for self-immolation and crisis ins Tibet, the Dalai Lama welcomed Chinese officials to “do thorough check” at his exile residence in Dharamshala.

“I am very good, please come here and (do) thorough check. Since 2008 crisis, even the former Prime minister Wen Jiabao (who) looks (as a) very nice (and) sensible person, he also accused (me) for the crisis that, it starts from India, I think he also mentioned my name, then immediately I responded, now please some Chinese officials, or international media, please come to Dharamshala (to do) through check,” the Tibetan spiritual leader said.

“Come to here instead of saying from distant. Come here, you will be our guest ... most important guest (and) check everything.”

On China’s new leadership and hopes to resolve the Tibetan issue with new leadership, the Tibetan Nobel Laureate said, “China is a another totalitarian and closed society. So the system as such, (a) few individuals cannot do much, but overall picture of China is changing. Today’s China, (as) compared to 30 to 40 years ago, much changed."

“China can do much more constructive role on global level or (in) Asia, for that trust (and) respect from the rest of the world is highly necessary in order to carry some constructive role. That is lacking now.”
On China’s restriction in allowing international and its lack of transparency in politics, the Dalai Lama pointed out that China should carry all political activities transparently, and promote rule of law and freedom for media.

“1.3 billions Chinese people have every right to know the reality and once 1.3 billion of Chinese people know the reality, they also have the ability to judge what is right or wrong.”

“Therefore censorship is immoral,” the Tibetan spiritual leader added.

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #173 on: March 27, 2013, 02:46:17 AM »
BEIJING (Reuters) - A Chinese official accused exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Friday of providing money to encourage people to set themselves on fire, and said they had evidence to prove the Nobel Peace Prize laureate was instigating the self-immolations.
More than 100 Tibetans have set themselves alight in protest against Chinese rule since 2009, mostly in heavily Tibetan areas of Sichuan, Gansu and Qinghai provinces rather than in what China terms the Tibet Autonomous Region. Most have died.

"Self-immolation is fundamentally immoral and inhumane behaviour," Padma Choling, the Chinese appointed head of Tibet's rubber stamp legislature, told reporters on the sidelines of China's annual meeting of parliament.

"Instead of being against this, and putting a stop to this, they are encouraging it and using other means, such as giving financial compensation, to continue to instigate incidents like these. I think this is even less humane," he added, referring to the Dalai Lama and other exiled Tibetans.
Beijing considers the Dalai Lama, who fled from China in 1959 after an abortive uprising against Chinese rule, a violent separatist. The Dalai Lama says he is merely seeking greater autonomy for his Himalayan homeland.

He has called on China to investigate the self-immolations. He has said he is not encouraging them but has called them "understandable".
Padma Choling said he had evidence to prove the Dalai Lama's involvement, though he did not provide it.
"There is some evidence that is not convenient to disclose here," he said.
China has tightened already strict controls in Tibet since the self-immolations began two years and has all but banned visits by foreign journalists.
Tibet's new governor, Losang Gyaltsen, appointed in January, signalled there would be no let-up to the heavy security.

"We will always place maintaining stability as our top priority and keep up crackdowns on all secessionist forces and sabotage activities," he said. "We cherish ethnic unity and stability as we cherish our own eyes."
China has defended its iron-fisted rule in Tibet, saying the mountainous region suffered from dire poverty and brutal exploitation until 1950, when Communist troops "peacefully liberated" it.
Tibet has also been a cause of considerable diplomatic friction, especially with the United States, where meetings between the Dalai Lama and U.S. presidents have infuriated China.
This week Tibetan writer and activist Tsering Woeser was named an International Woman of Courage by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, drawing a sharp rebuke from China.
"Woeser has frequently published articles distorting facts about Tibet that vilify China's ethnic policies, incite ethnic separatist feelings, and destroy China's ethnic unity," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a daily news briefing.

"The United States giving this kind of person an award is the same as public support for her separatist speech, and clearly violates its frequent promises to recognise Tibet as part of China."
Woeser is banned from leaving China and has been under house arrest in Beijing for the last two days. (Additional reporting by Michael Martina; Editing by Ben Blanchard)

Ensapa

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #174 on: March 27, 2013, 04:39:14 AM »
Dalai Lama talks about self-immolation
[Tuesday, March 26, 2013 17:17]

A screen grab from Timesnow.tv
DHARAMSHALA, March 25: Speaking about the on-going self-immolation protest in Tibet, His Holiness the Dalai Lama said that “the ultimate factor is their (self-immolators) individual motivation.”

The Dalai Lama spoke to TIMES NOW, a major Indian news channel.

“Actually, suicide is basically (a) type of violence but then question of good or bad actually depend on the motivation and goal. I think (as) goal is concern, these (self-immolators) people (are) not drunk, (do) not (have) family problem, this (self-immolation) is for Buddha dharma, for Tibetan National interest but then I think the ultimate factor is their individual motivation,” the 77-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader said.

“If motivation (consists) too much anger, hatred, then it is negative (but) if the motivation (is) more compassionate, calm mind then such acts also can be positive. That is strictly speaking from Buddhist view of point. Any action whether violence or non violence, is ultimately depend on motivation.”

Since 2009 there have been 111 Tibetans self-immolations against China’s occupation. Overwhelming majority of them demanded freedom and return of the Dalai Lama from exile. Thousands of Tibetans have carried out mass protests even as Chinese authorities have increased their repressive policies and tightened the noose around self-immolations.

Responding to the question of China’s blame on the Tibetan spiritual leader for self-immolation and crisis ins Tibet, the Dalai Lama welcomed Chinese officials to “do thorough check” at his exile residence in Dharamshala.

“I am very good, please come here and (do) thorough check. Since 2008 crisis, even the former Prime minister Wen Jiabao (who) looks (as a) very nice (and) sensible person, he also accused (me) for the crisis that, it starts from India, I think he also mentioned my name, then immediately I responded, now please some Chinese officials, or international media, please come to Dharamshala (to do) through check,” the Tibetan spiritual leader said.

“Come to here instead of saying from distant. Come here, you will be our guest ... most important guest (and) check everything.”

On China’s new leadership and hopes to resolve the Tibetan issue with new leadership, the Tibetan Nobel Laureate said, “China is a another totalitarian and closed society. So the system as such, (a) few individuals cannot do much, but overall picture of China is changing. Today’s China, (as) compared to 30 to 40 years ago, much changed."

“China can do much more constructive role on global level or (in) Asia, for that trust (and) respect from the rest of the world is highly necessary in order to carry some constructive role. That is lacking now.”
On China’s restriction in allowing international and its lack of transparency in politics, the Dalai Lama pointed out that China should carry all political activities transparently, and promote rule of law and freedom for media.

“1.3 billions Chinese people have every right to know the reality and once 1.3 billion of Chinese people know the reality, they also have the ability to judge what is right or wrong.”

“Therefore censorship is immoral,” the Tibetan spiritual leader added.

The only question is how many of the self immolations were actually done peacefully? Most of the self immolators run in pain while they are being burned. There are also those who survived and who regretted their actions. So for sure the self immolations were not done for the benefit of the Tibetans but for something else: fame in Dharamsala so that they will be honored as heroes for a long time.

If HHDL wants to talk about knowing reality, he should also say the same about the Dorje Shugden issue and tell his students to do their research on Dorje Shugden because people deserve to know about the truth about Dorje Shugden and not just believe he is evil. The situation looks so paradoxical here.

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #175 on: March 28, 2013, 12:32:08 PM »
DHARAMSHALA, March 28: Considering different ways of setting themselves on fire in Tibet, the exile Tibetan administration includes Tulku Thupten Nyendak and his niece Atse in the list of self-immolators.

Forty-five-year-old Thupten Nyendak of Dragkar Monastery in Lhagang in Kham, Eastern Tibet, and Atse, 23, from Serta Tibetan Buddhist Institute set themselves on fire at the former’s residence in Dzogchen Monastery on 6 April 2012. This reportedly happened after they offered butter lamps and prayers for all the Tibetan.

“As a Tibetan and Buddhist, we offer prayer for 113 Tibetans who self-immolated in Tibet, out of which we have been saying 83 [took place] in 2012. But now it is [confirmed] 85 in 2012 and 95 have died,” said Dr Lobsang Sangay, the prime minister of exile Tibet.


CTA holds a prayer service for Tibetan self-immolators at the Tsug-la Khang in Dharamshala on March 27, 2013. (Phayul photo/Phuntsok Yangchen)
Hundreds of Tibetans and supporters, including Dr Lobsang Sangay and other dignitaries of Tibetan government and school students attended a prayer service held at the Tsuglakhang, the main temple, near the residence of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

The special service was held for Thupten Nyendak, Atse, Kal Kyi (30) and Lhamo Kyab (43) who set themselves on fire in protest against China's continuing occupation of their homeland.

Kal Kyi, set herself ablaze protesting near Jonang monastery in Zamthang in Eastern Tibet at 3:30 pm (local time) on March 24.
She is survived by her husband and four children, who are all below 15.

On March 25, Lhamo Kyab set himself ablaze in a forest in Sangchu County in Amdo, Eastern Tibet. The self-immolation took place around 10 pm (local time). He died in his fiery protest.

The number of Tibetan self-immolations since 2009 now stands at 113.

michaela

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #176 on: March 29, 2013, 03:22:17 AM »
I have never been a supporter of self-immolation.  I think taking any lives including our own is killing in one way or another.  Life is an illussion and every experience that we encounter will pass no matter how real it seems at the moment.  Taking one’s life because one cannot bear the illussion/ experience that one is having at the moment is not worth it. 

Having said that, I have in the past contemplating to take my own life.  For example when my mom said that I am worthless or I was broken hearted or when my work colleagues united to crush me.  These experiences although it was intense at the moment and just like an actress in a play, I was carried away about what has been said or done toward me, they seem like a distant dream now and insignificant.  And I am glad that I did not take those drastic measures. 

Experience come and go.  It is best not to be attached to them whether the experiences are good or bad because they will not last.  Hanging your hopes and dream at the fancy of the moment is useless.  You only need to look back at your life to know that what I say is true.

Ensapa

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #177 on: March 29, 2013, 05:01:09 AM »
I have never been a supporter of self-immolation.  I think taking any lives including our own is killing in one way or another.  Life is an illussion and every experience that we encounter will pass no matter how real it seems at the moment.  Taking one’s life because one cannot bear the illussion/ experience that one is having at the moment is not worth it. 

Having said that, I have in the past contemplating to take my own life.  For example when my mom said that I am worthless or I was broken hearted or when my work colleagues united to crush me.  These experiences although it was intense at the moment and just like an actress in a play, I was carried away about what has been said or done toward me, they seem like a distant dream now and insignificant.  And I am glad that I did not take those drastic measures. 

Experience come and go.  It is best not to be attached to them whether the experiences are good or bad because they will not last.  Hanging your hopes and dream at the fancy of the moment is useless.  You only need to look back at your life to know that what I say is true.

Sorry to hear about your past experiences and thank you for sharing them here, Micheala. It must be a very difficult time for you to be able to endure all of those experiences but yet stand up and not do anything that might bring in more suffering. But in the case of self immolations, these people were incited to self immolate and China has proof that the instigators actually talk people to self immolating and then stand nearby with recording devices so that footage of self immolations can be sent to Dharamsala and elsewhere so that there will be more 'awareness'. that is why Phayul usually gets pictures of the self immolations. To be honest, I dont believe that all of the self immolations are for the independence of Tibet because there are so many other ways to work towards that without self immolating. Definitely, self immolation is something that wont appear in the minds of people that easily.

icy

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #178 on: March 29, 2013, 08:22:33 AM »
A monk sets self ablaze in Tibet

DHARAMSHALA, March 29: A monk from Mogri Monastery in Luchu in Eastern Tibet has set himself on fire in an apparent protest against China’s continuing occupation of Tibet.

“Kunchok Tenzin set himself ablaze at a road intersection near his monastery at 7pm (local time) on Tuesday, March 26,” said Kanyag Tsering of Dharamsala-based Kirti Monastery, who closely monitors self-immolations inside Tibet.
Twenty-eight-year-old Tenzin died in his fiery protest.

“Following his self-immolation protest, the local Tibetans carried his charred body inside the monastery premises and cremated it on the same night to prevent the body from falling into Chinese security personnel’s hands,” Tsering added.
Tenzin, son of Lhakho and Lhamo Tso, became a monk in Morgi Monastery at young age.


Undated photo of Kunchok Tenzin
Last week, David Sweet, a Canadian parliamentarian raised the issue of Tibet in the House of Commons and called upon Xi Jinping to meet with the leaders of the Tibetan Government-in-exile.

“I would like to note that the world is now watching how President Jinping's government lives by those words and lives up to those expectations with regard to the situation in Tibet,” said Sweet.

There have now been 114 confirmed self-immolations in the occupied Tibet. Sixteen of them took place since the beginning of this year.

China’s media blackout and severe security clampdown in Tibet are some of the reasons why the news of Kunchok Tenzin’s self-immolation took two days to get out.

Ensapa

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Re: Self-immolation, again, now in Lhasa
« Reply #179 on: March 29, 2013, 07:12:41 PM »
What an intelligent way to deter self immolations! By building a statue of the very first self immolator! GENIUS TIBETANS.

Quote
TYC Unveiled Jampel Yeshi’s Statue
Phayul[Thursday, March 28, 2013 16:40]
By Phuntsok Yangchen



DHARAMSHALA, March 28: On the first anniversary of Jampel Yeshi’s self-immolation, the Tibetan Youth Congress today unveiled his statue at Lhagyal Ri in Dharamshala.

“As a Tibetan, he thought that his country was taken away from him, and he has no other way to resist except to sacrifice his life,” said former political prisoner Palden Gyatso, who was the chief guest for the occasion.

Yeshi's statue is installed next to Thupten Ngodup’s, who was the first Tibetan to self-immolate in exile, to remember and honour his sacrifice for the Tibetan struggle. Yeshi’s last message is printed on a plaque below the statue.

Jampel Yeshi, 26, self-immolated on 26 March last year to protest against China’s occupation of Tibet a day before the then Chinese President Hu Jintaos’ visit to attend the 4th BRICS Summit in New Delhi.

Suffering 98 per cent burn, Yeshi passed away in the morning of March 28.
He became the second person in exile to die from self-immolation after Ngodup died from after he set himself in fire on 27 April 1998.

“Jampel Yeshi and 113 other Tibetans in Tibet have self-immolated for the cause of Tibet and Tibetans. And it is our responsibility to make sure that their sacrifices do not go in vain,” said Tsewang Rigzin, President of the Tibetan Youth Congress.

Hundreds of Tibetans and leaders of various organizations attended the ceremony and offered scarves at Yeshi’s statue. It was an intensely moving occasion for many Tibetans, including Lhasang Tsering, former President of TYC, who choked with emotion.

Yeshi was born in Tibet. In exile, he studied at the Tibetan Transit School and later moved to Delhi.