Author Topic: Dharmapala Yakya Chamsing  (Read 3819 times)

psylotripitaka

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 616
Dharmapala Yakya Chamsing
« on: April 11, 2015, 11:39:31 PM »
Here's a pic of the Protector Yakya Chamsing mentioned in the general Protector section of Dorje Shugden Kangso used in the NKT.

I know that he is especially related to Hayagriva Sangdrup and has a special sadhana included in the Hayagriva Sangdrup sadhana from Dechen Ling Press.

psylotripitaka

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 616
Re: Dharmapala Yakya Chamsing
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2015, 12:01:17 AM »
And here's a pic of his fulfilling substances

Kim Hyun Jae

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 304
    • Email
Re: Dharmapala Yakya Chamsing
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2015, 07:31:11 AM »
I found some reference to Chamsing or Begtse (guardian) here.

http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/advanced/tantra/level1_getting_started/what_dharma_protectors_ab.html

"Another figure, Chamsing, also known as Beg-tse (Turkish: bekçi, guardian), was similarly incorporated into the Tibetan Buddhist sphere from Central Asia. According to tradition, Chamsing was tamed and brought in from Khotan, an oasis city-state in East Turkistan, most probably during the eleventh century. He wears Central Asian style armor. One hypothesis for the connection between Khotan, the Turkic name “Beg-tse,” the military armor, and the Tibetans is as follows. During the first half of the tenth century, the Qarakhanid Turks, previously known as the Qarluq, converted to Islam from their prior blend of Buddhism and their native Tengri beliefs. At the beginning of the eleventh century, the Qarakhanids expanded their empire further by conquering Buddhist Khotan and converting it to Islam. The Tibetans unsuccessfully came to the defense of the Khotanese. Whether Beg-tse was a protector spirit neglected by the Qarakhanids when they had followed Buddhism is difficult to determine. However, that is a possible explanation for how the first Tibetan propitiatory rituals for Cham-sing appeared at this time, with this curious blend of Khotanese and Turkic elements."