Author Topic: You are correct!  (Read 7798 times)

bambi

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You are correct!
« on: July 01, 2012, 05:27:54 PM »
Two monks who came out of a lecture by their master went on a hot debate regarding what they heard during the lecture. Each of them insited that his understanding was the correct one. To settle the dispute, they went to see the master for a judgement.

After hearing the argument put forth by the first monk, the master said, "You are correct!" The monk was overjoy. Casting a winner's glance at his friend, he left the room.

The second monk was upset and started to pour out what he thought to the master. After he finished, the master looked at him and said, "You are correct, too." Hearing this, the second monk brightened up and went away.

A third monk who was also in the room was greatly puzzled by what he saw. He said to the master, "I am confused, master! Their positions regarding the issue are completely opposite. They can't be both right! How could you say that they are both correct?"

The master smiled as he looked into the eyes of this third monk, "You are also correct!"

What does this mean?

ratanasutra

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2012, 05:55:58 PM »
Wow.. this is interesting story. i think and think about it and this is my 2 opinions
1st  the master is so skilful and has so much compassion for his students, in order to develop the confident and encourage them to study more so he said what 3 of them said are correct.

2nd the master knows that what the 3  monks said are partially correct only but from their knowledge now they are not able to understand or absorb it. So he just wait for the right time that they gain more knowledge and ready to learn more to explain to them at one time.



Big Uncle

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2012, 06:07:36 PM »
Two monks who came out of a lecture by their master went on a hot debate regarding what they heard during the lecture. Each of them insited that his understanding was the correct one. To settle the dispute, they went to see the master for a judgement.

After hearing the argument put forth by the first monk, the master said, "You are correct!" The monk was overjoy. Casting a winner's glance at his friend, he left the room.

The second monk was upset and started to pour out what he thought to the master. After he finished, the master looked at him and said, "You are correct, too." Hearing this, the second monk brightened up and went away.

A third monk who was also in the room was greatly puzzled by what he saw. He said to the master, "I am confused, master! Their positions regarding the issue are completely opposite. They can't be both right! How could you say that they are both correct?"

The master smiled as he looked into the eyes of this third monk, "You are also correct!"

What does this mean?

It initially sounded rhetorical to me but when I thought about it deeper, I think the master told each of the monks that their views are correct because it was according to their own viewpoints. They are basically conventional truths that are established based upon the perception of the individual.

They are very real and totally logical in each case because each individual have different perception that is shaped by unique experiences and level of perception. However, a universal truth would be inclusive of all these convention truths and one that is irrefutable from all angles. In Buddhism, we try to arrive at this truth because that is what will help us to realize ultimate reality.

Before we go that far, understanding this very basic concept that people have individual experiences and so they will arrive at a different viewpoints makes us understand one another better and have lesser hangups about people. In that way, such an understanding leads to harmony and happiness. I think that would be a more relational way of explaining the intent of the master.

Carpenter

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 07:26:41 PM »
In Buddhism, there is no absolute right or absolute wrong, it is just the difference of perception and understanding. Inside a Dharma teaching, there are 100 students, Dharma teacher is the same, but after the teaching, the 100 students will have different understand and the reason is their understanding is based on their background, education, personal experience, etc

But it doesn’t matter of how you understand it, as long as the teaching helps you to practice Dharma with the correct mindset. Not to mention about different, even just ourselves, when we listen to the same Dharma teaching again after 1 year, we will have different point of view also, because we had experience different things and therefore, our understanding followed to change also.

So the master tell them that they are correct is because of their different understanding level.

Dorje Pakmo

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2012, 07:27:29 PM »
I think the moral behind this story is that every individual has different perspectives in viewing a certain situation, due to different level of understanding and experience; hence everyone is right to a certain level. However, it is how much one listens and accepts the opinions of others that make them wiser.
The first monk after being told he was right left the room feeling victorious but gained nothing by ignoring what was said by the second monk and without checking further with their master.

The second monk having listened to the first monk has a good chance to check with their master how can both of them be right? But didn’t. He didn’t gain anything because he too was as proud as the first monk walked away contented by just hearing what he wanted to hear, that he is right. Hence like the first monk, learned nothing due to ego, arrogance and ignorance.

The third monk however after having listened to both monks debate, checked with their master how can both of them be right at the same time when they have contradicting opinion? He learned a valuable lesson that every individual has differing opinions in viewing a situation due to the way things are shaped around them. Everybody due to their past experience hold on to a certain set of believe of how things should be or can be. Therefore, it is important to listen and be neutral to opinions, as everybody may have differing input, but when the inputs are combined, new ideas might just be formed.
DORJE PAKMO

biggyboy

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2012, 08:32:14 PM »
There's no right or wrong answers to the questions posted to the 2 monks.  Mainly answers would depend alot on each individual perceptions, level of understanding, experiences, present circumstances, etc.  Hence, each individual monk would have different answers and their own logical reasoning.

Similarly, when we listen to similar topic over many times it does not mean that what we have deduced before may not be the same the next time we listen again.  This goes on and on as there's no ever ending logical reasoning and answer to one single teaching.  Likewise, when we read dharma article, answers will also evolve with time, understanding, perception and circumstances too.  There's no right or wrong reasoning and answers to it all.

Hence, the master told to all the 3 monks that they are correct due to their level of understanding and perceptions.

DS Star

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2012, 10:39:30 PM »
And yet another interesting story by Bambi, thank you..

I like Dorje Pakmo's opinion.

I think the moral behind this story is that every individual has different perspectives in viewing a certain situation, due to different level of understanding and experience; hence everyone is right to a certain level. However, it is how much one listens and accepts the opinions of others that make them wiser.
The first monk after being told he was right left the room feeling victorious but gained nothing by ignoring what was said by the second monk and without checking further with their master.

The second monk having listened to the first monk has a good chance to check with their master how can both of them be right? But didn’t. He didn’t gain anything because he too was as proud as the first monk walked away contented by just hearing what he wanted to hear, that he is right. Hence like the first monk, learned nothing due to ego, arrogance and ignorance.

The third monk however after having listened to both monks debate, checked with their master how can both of them be right at the same time when they have contradicting opinion? He learned a valuable lesson that every individual has differing opinions in viewing a situation due to the way things are shaped around them. Everybody due to their past experience hold on to a certain set of believe of how things should be or can be. Therefore, it is important to listen and be neutral to opinions, as everybody may have differing input, but when the inputs are combined, new ideas might just be formed.


The master is indeed is very wise and very skillful. We may wonder how can both monks be correct when they have a totally different view on the same subject matter? Like Dorje Pakmo's explanation, each one of them is correct based on his individual's understanding derived from his own experience and the level of his education, culture, etc. Like Big Uncle mentioned: "In Buddhism, there is no absolute right or absolute wrong, it is just the difference of perception and understanding."

Buddhism is flexible to suit different needs of people. However, the Truth is always true no matter how we understand it. The Law of Karma is the undisputed truth. Whether we believe it or not, the "Law' still applies to everyone and every living being. The level of understanding of this topic on Karma is as important as HOW we apply it into or lives.

As long as we understand the basic, that every action has its effect, we will avoid doing the negative actions and thus avoiding the negative effects... So I reckon, that was why the master said all 3 of them are correct.

Jessie Fong

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2012, 11:47:46 PM »
None of the students was declared as having he wrong answer as the Master had skilfully answered them as correct for they had answered according to their perception.

I would say that it is subjective because each person's understanding of a subject matter is different, thus it is not wrong to say which one is correct or which is wrong.  Perception is just an interpretation of your own view.

All 3 of the monks could have been wrong, though.  But he said "You are correct" to all of them.  When each of them declared their answer, they cold very well have said "The truth as I see it."

bambi

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2012, 03:23:36 PM »
You are all correct! :P

What you perceive may not be what I perceive. Therefore like what all of you said, there is not right or wrong from understanding teachings. We all have different ways of applying it to our daily lives. The master knew this and solved it in the best way he could. There is no wrong view on any of the answers given by the 3 monks. Because of the 3 monks each have their different karma and ignorance, they have different answers. Such a skillful master.

Tenzin K

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2012, 03:59:21 PM »
I don't believe in right and wrong. Just skillful and unskillful toward liberation.

Well I think the vast majority of the world disagrees with you. Killing someone is wrong as well as being unskillful.

There is no such thing as right and wrong, since everything is conditioned. To say that things can be right and wrong morally (not something being a fact or a lie) would have to mean there are absolute truths: but I'm pretty sure Buddha taught against there being absolute moral truths - only skillful and unskillful actions.

There is no such thing as right and wrong, since everything is conditioned. To say that things can be right and wrong morally (not something being a fact or a lie) would have to mean there are absolute truths: but I'm pretty sure Buddha taught against there being absolute moral truths - only skillful and unskillful actions.


brian

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Re: You are correct!
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2012, 04:05:19 PM »
In Dharma as general, there is no right and there is no wrong. It is all solely based on the perception of things and seeing things from different angles. It is not right to even judge on who is right and who is wrong. Everybody has their own mindset and set of arguements, if it is really as simple as like killing is bad but what about mercy killing? Or a much better example will be "giving money to the beggar, will he actually be helped or we are actually harming him even further by increasing his habit of relying on someone to help instead of helping themselves". There are too many instances in daily lives that people would not agree on a matter or situation. It is solely based on what we are thinking about the matter.