Author Topic: Steal the moon  (Read 16285 times)

Q

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Re: Steal the moon
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2012, 07:46:46 AM »
I believe it is because the more difficult we feel to give our possessions (especially to support a good cause) is a reflection of our sense of 'I', selfishness, and insecurities.

Yet, people give their wealth away all the time! Investing in houses and stock market... they are willing to part with their material wealth for these type of things (sometimes a huge sum of it!) because they know perhaps they can gain more wealth through parting with whatever initial amount. There's no certainty they'd make money out of it, and there's the potential of losing it all, but people still do it anyway.

Therefore, besides the strong sense of "I"... it is also due to lack of knowledge that leads a person to feel reluctant to giving material or their time in aid to Dharma. They just dont know any better on how lucky they are to be able to invest in their merit bank, just because they don't see the immediate benefit out of it... or worst, don't notice the benefit even when they experience it (ie meeting the Dharma, wanting the Dharma, having all the right conditions to practice the Dharma etc)

pgdharma

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Re: Steal the moon
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2012, 04:10:55 PM »
The Zen master is very compassionate. Out of his love for others, he offered his clothes to the thief so that the thief do not have to collect the negative karma of stealing the clothes from him. He did not show any anger towards the thief instead he took pity of him.  How many of us can be like this Zen master.  It is not easy to practice great virtues of compassion, generosity and selflessness as we are attached to our possessions. Even in giving we are selective of what and who to give. Having met the dharma we should contemplate on the act of giving and apply what we learn in order to cut off our miserliness and practice generosity.

bambi

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Re: Steal the moon
« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2012, 04:39:37 AM »
The Zen master is really compassionate and forgiving. Knowing that stealing is wrong, yet the master gave the thief His clothes when he had nothing else to give. Like what pgdharma said is true, He offered it to the thief because he didnt want the thief to collect more negative karma. The master was practicing the paramita of goods giving.

I have found this online at http://www.buddhistdoor.com/oldweb/bdoor/archive/nutshell/teach15.htm

BODHISATTVA'S PRACTICE - SIX PARAMITAS

Paramita is a Sanskrit word, which means to cross over to the other shore. It implies crossing over from the Sea of suffering to the Shore of happiness, from the Samsara of birth and death to Nirvana and from ignorance to enlightenment.

A Bodhisattva who practices the Six Paramitas, can take across the Sea of Suffering, enter Nirvana and attain enlightenment. Since these are also the six ways that can cross the sentient beings over, therefore, they are called Six Paramitas.

One of the six Paramitas are :

Giving

There are three kinds of givings:

Goods Giving
For those poor and disabled, we have to help them with money and goods for living. If people cannot survive, are not satisfied with their basic need, they will not listen to what you say and follow what you do. Though the help is sometimes minimal, it is an immediate solution to relieve them from suffering, starving, coldness, etc. With the immeasurable mind of compassion, a Bodhisattva does not hesitate to help under these circumstances.


Dharma Giving

To teach him how to fish is better than to give him a fish. For those who has no skill to work, we have to teach them to work in society, earn a living without relying on the financial support from others. Our financial resources are limited. Money is not an ultimate solution to all problems.
Fundamentally, we have to help them improving their karma that has led them to where they are now. We have to help them to understand the principle of cause and effect and other Buddha's teachings, which is a long-term solution. Buddha Dharma giving is the highest order of giving.

Courage Giving
It is also called fearlessness giving. For those who live in vexation, fear and despair, we have to take care of them and encourage them to overcome any difficulties encountered.

DS Star

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Re: Steal the moon
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2012, 03:12:48 AM »
Thank you Bambi for detail explanation on The "Paramita of Giving".

If I may, on the term Paramita, it is normally translated as "Perfection". I believed it is translated this way to mean that those who 'crossed over" have already achieved 'perfection' for this particular virtue, thus, the sutra "Prajna Paramita" is translated as "Perfection of Wisdom" where Prajna is referred to "Wisdom" and "Paramita" is referred to as "Perfection", this translation is commonly used in the Heart Sutra.

Bambi, I agree with you on this:

For those who has no skill to work, we have to teach them to work in society, earn a living without relying on the financial support from others. Our financial resources are limited. Money is not an ultimate solution to all problems.

Fundamentally, we have to help them improving their karma that has led them to where they are now. We have to help them to understand the principle of cause and effect and other Buddha's teachings, which is a long-term solution. Buddha Dharma giving is the highest order of giving.


Long term solution is very important rather than help them to solve just the immediately problems. Then again, if situation is really bad, we still need to give some helps as relief before teaching them to stand on their feet :)

Tenzin K

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Re: Steal the moon
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2012, 11:59:54 PM »
The Zen Master is practicing great compassion not just about things that he has but the way he give it to. The Zen Master doesn’t want s the thief create negative karma but through his compassion action he can gives. In his view the thief is in need and nothing much important to just benefit others with whatever the Zen Master can gives.

What I really learn from this Zen Master is pure compassion and selflessness. Nothing that we have is permanent and the Zen Master even give out whatever he has in seeing that others need it more than himself.
From this quality we would be able to further enhance our thought and actions to the benefit others.

sonamdhargey

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Re: Steal the moon
« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2012, 10:37:07 AM »
The Zen master is very compassionate. Out of his love for others, he offered his clothes to the thief so that the thief do not have to collect the negative karma of stealing the clothes from him. He did not show any anger towards the thief instead he took pity of him.  How many of us can be like this Zen master.  It is not easy to practice great virtues of compassion, generosity and selflessness as we are attached to our possessions. Even in giving we are selective of what and who to give. Having met the dharma we should contemplate on the act of giving and apply what we learn in order to cut off our miserliness and practice generosity.

Hmm.. I find your view rather interesting on ' he offered his clothes to the thief so that the thief do not have to collect the negative karma of stealing the clothes from him. He did not show any anger towards the thief instead he took pity of him.  How", I have the same thoughts too. I can imagined the great bliss that Zen Master is experiencing by giving to a theif rather tha holding on to his attachments. So much trouble averted from this mere decision. So much to gain from this act and such an impression the Zen Mater has left on the thief, the act of compassion and generosity can probably change the thief's ways.