Author Topic: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home  (Read 741 times)

Rowntree

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The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« on: June 29, 2019, 05:10:38 AM »
'But relations with the current occupant of the White House are very different. Despite being open to a meeting with President Donald Trump, the Dalai Lama told me that Mr Trump, who is close to China's Xi, had never asked for one.

The Dalai Lama's advancing years may have curtailed his foreign travel schedule, but the spiritual leader says he hasn't received a call from Mr Trump either.

In a scathing assessment, he said the 45th president's time in office was defined by a "lack of moral principle", a contrast to remarks made in 2016 when he said he had "no worries" about a Trump presidency.

"When he became president he expressed America first. That is wrong," the Dalai Lama told me.

The withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and the migrant crisis are two big areas of concern. "When I saw pictures of some of those young children, I was sad," he said of the situation at the US-Mexico border. "America... should take a global responsibility."

The Dalai Lama is keen to separate his relationship with the president, or lack of one, with that of other American politicians. He highlights the vice-president's support for the Tibetan people and the backing he has enjoyed from politicians in both houses of Congress.'


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The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home

By Rajini Vaidyanathan
BBC News, Dharamshala

He is, without a doubt, one of the best-known people on the planet. In an age where celebrity is worshipped, the Dalai Lama is a faith leader who has become a spiritual superstar.

As he approaches his 84th birthday, the monk who has handed out millions of handshakes and crafted as many inspirational quotes, is candid and at times shocking.

I met him at his residence high in the mountains, in the town of McLeod-Ganj near Dharamshala in the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh.

For a man so revered - seen as superhuman by many - he was refreshingly down to Earth. As he entered the room wearing his trademark red robes, assisted by his aides, he emanated the air of an approachable Clark Kent rather than an unearthly Superman.

And yet this is a man who has met world leaders and shared stages with pop stars and actors. A man who has long been a thorn in China's side.

"One Chinese official once called me a demon," he said laughing, before raising his hands to his head to mimic horns. "When I first heard that, my response was - yes, I'm a demon with horns."


"I pity their ignorance, their political thinking is very narrow minded," he added as he chuckled.

The grudge with China is longstanding and has defined his entire life. The Dalai Lama was forced to flee his home of Tibet in 1959 after China sent troops into the region.

He sought refuge in India and for six decades has been living in exile in Dharamsala along with some 10,000 Tibetans. His monastery - which overlooks the snow-capped peaks of the Dhauladhar range in the Himalayas - is breathtakingly beautiful. But the view is bittersweet.

His life's cause - to return home - remains a distant dream, even if he insists it may yet happen. "The Tibetan people have trust in me, they ask me [to] come to Tibet," he says.

But in the next breath he adds that India has also become his "spiritual home". An implicit acceptance, perhaps, that his goal of an autonomous Tibet is far from reality.

While he "formally" stepped down from political responsibilities in 2011, as the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people he has continued to be their figurehead.

There haven't been talks between his representatives and China for many years.

The Dalai Lama told me China's President Xi Jinping had yet to ask him for a meeting. He did tell me that he had had some discussions with retired Chinese officials in the past few years, but none of these seem to have moved the dial.

In 1959, when China first sent troops in, Tibet was poor. Now it is an economic behemoth and its growing influence has in many ways overshadowed the Dalai Lama's cause.

There was a time when the Dalai Lama was the toast of capitals around the world as US presidents lined up to meet him. George W Bush famously presented him with the Congressional gold medal while Barack Obama met him on a number of occasions, including in Delhi in 2017 after he left office.

But relations with the current occupant of the White House are very different. Despite being open to a meeting with President Donald Trump, the Dalai Lama told me that Mr Trump, who is close to China's Xi, had never asked for one.

The Dalai Lama's advancing years may have curtailed his foreign travel schedule, but the spiritual leader says he hasn't received a call from Mr Trump either.

In a scathing assessment, he said the 45th president's time in office was defined by a "lack of moral principle", a contrast to remarks made in 2016 when he said he had "no worries" about a Trump presidency.

"When he became president he expressed America first. That is wrong," the Dalai Lama told me.

The withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and the migrant crisis are two big areas of concern. "When I saw pictures of some of those young children, I was sad," he said of the situation at the US-Mexico border. "America... should take a global responsibility."

The Dalai Lama is keen to separate his relationship with the president, or lack of one, with that of other American politicians. He highlights the vice-president's support for the Tibetan people and the backing he has enjoyed from politicians in both houses of Congress.

President Trump's apparent snub is reflective of the wider pressure Beijing is able to exert on those who engage with the Dalai Lama.

In 2012, China temporarily froze relations with the UK after David Cameron met him and. last year, the Indian government cancelled its plans for a celebration to mark 60 years of his exile, for fear it would upset Beijing.

The Dalai Lama's world view is inherently global. When we discuss Brexit he tells me that he is "an admirer of the European Union" pointing out that global partnerships have been key in avoiding major conflicts.

But the world's most famous refugee has some surprising views on immigration.

In a speech last year he said that refugees to the European Union should ultimately return home, adding that "Europe is for Europeans", a statement he stood by when I challenged him on it.

"European countries should take these refugees and give them education and training, and the aim is return to their own land with certain skills," he said.

The Dalai Lama believes the end game should be to rebuild the countries people have fled. But with some 70 million people displaced across the world according to the latest figures, what if people want to stay?

"A limited number is OK, but the whole of Europe [will] eventually become Muslim country, African country - impossible," he said. A controversial viewpoint, and a reminder that while the Dalai Lama is a spiritual figurehead he is also a politician with views and opinions like everyone else.

Image caption
The Dalai Lama's monastery overlooks the snow-capped peaks of the Dhauladhar range in the Himalayas
Later in our conversation I also challenged him on another remark he made in 2015, when he said if he was followed by a female Dalai Lama she would have to be attractive.

In another surprise, he reaffirmed his belief that beauty matters as much as brains. "If a female Dalai Lama comes, she should be more attractive," he told me while laughing.

His message seemed at odds for a man who preaches a message of tolerance and inner confidence, but the Dalai Lama told me that in Buddhist literature both inner and outer beauty matter. He also said that equality was important and was keen to stress that he supported women's rights and equal pay in the workplace.

As the interview drew to a close, I was struck by how unexpectedly frank our discussion had been, which reminded me of something the Dalai Lama had told me earlier in the day.

One advantage of not being able to return home to Tibet, he said, was that India is a free country where he can express himself openly.

The Dalai Lama's message of unity is universal - but for a man famed for his compassion, he can also be controversial.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48772175

Tracy

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2019, 08:07:32 AM »
What this journalist says about the Dalai Lama is quite right. The Dalai Lama is a man famed for his compassion, he can also be controversial. It seems like since a few years ago, he has been making comments that contradicts himself.

Many people including the journalist is now questioning his credibility. How can he say one thing today and say another the next day that confuses people? He is not sure of what he says anymore. If for secular matters he can change his mind so easily, how about the Dharma teachings he has been preaching?

When the Dalai Lama is not sure of his stance, he is going to lose his supporters. Tibetans in exile rely heavily on their sponsors, should they lose their financial support, they will not be able to survive. It does not take a genius to guess what will happen to the Tibetans and the CTA. Soon, the CTA will have to dissolve and Tibetans have to make their choice whether to go back to China, become Indian citizens or migrate to other countries.

SabS

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2019, 08:50:59 AM »
I find it strange that the Dalai Lama could make comments on refugees and how they should be sent back after a period of time. The Dalai Lama and the exiles have been staying in India due to the courtesy of Indians and have been there for 60 years going on to 99years (agreement with PM Nehru). So is the Dalai Lama inferring the Tibetans refugees should go back too? The Dalai Lama had for many years now been wishing to return to Tibet and is even agreeable to Tibet under China's rule. I guess he did foresee the progress that China would have invested into Tibet which we are seeing now. But is it a little too late when CTA is still making and promoting so much hate speech against China. Why would China even bother to heed you when you keep irking her? Stupid President Lobsang Sangay. Wrong strategy.

As for reincarnating as a woman, a very beautiful one at that. Why not? Beautiful woman gets the attention. So if it is for Dharma, I don't see any problem with that. After all, enlightened beings are only concern about the spirituality of all beings. Maybe we have degenerated to that stage where female energy is needed.

Pema8

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2019, 04:47:33 PM »
It is sad that the Dalai Lama still is not able to return to Tibet. India only has given the Tibetans permission to stay only for a limited amount of time. So what will happen when time is over?

Are the Tibetans so well seen in India that they will get a longer stay? I doubt it with all the events in Delhi cancelled ...
After all, the Tibetans could become Indians as there is no hope to get Tibet back. Especially with their tendency to call the Chinese people all kind of names...

With the Dalai Lama growing older, there is little hope for the Tibetans under the CTA.

dsnowlion

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2019, 01:43:53 PM »
Well thanks to Lobsang Sangay.... Dalai Lama can sure kiss going back to Tibet good bye!

Sangay said, acknowledging that “the Chinese plan is to create confusion among the Tibetans with the emergence of two Dalai Lamas, one nominated by them and the other by Tibetan exiles.” Funny Lobsang Sangay should mention that since they were the ones who started this tradition of confusion and double-ups in recognition.

He also slams current China’s Panchen Lama and arrogant asks “How many follow him?’’ I think he needs to do go back to school to calculate how many exile Tibetans are there versus how many actual Tibetans there are in Tibet (6 million vs 120 over thousands)

He also made a bold comment that Ogyen Trinley Dorje saying that “He will return as the Indian government has done a lot for him. There was some misunderstanding but for the last six or seven years his treatment has become better”. And he had the cheek to claim that the CTA is democratic and hence stands in solidarity with the recent Hong Kong’s protest.
   

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Buddhists won’t accept a Chinese Dalai Lama: President of Tibetan Government-in-exile
https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nation/buddhists-won-t-accept-a-chinese-dalai-lama-president-of-tibetan-government-in-exile/813870.html

Sandeep Dikshit
Tribune News Service
New Delhi, August 6

President of theTibetan Government-in-exile Lobsang Sangay is confident that Buddhists will not accept any Chinese move to foist the 5th Dalai Lama.

“That’s the Chinese plan,’’ he said about recent Chinese claims that the successor to the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso will be chosen by Beijing. “We are talking of reincarnation of the Dalai Lama’s consciousness and soul. Look at the Chinese government’s track record which has always vilified the present Dalai Lama. Who will accept their claim? How many Tibetans will follow a Chinese Dalai Lama?,’’ he said, acknowledging that the Chinese plan is to create confusion among the Tibetans with the emergence of two Dalai Lamas, one nominated by them and the other by Tibetan exiles.

Asked if there can be two Dalai Lamas, he felt that is the Chinese game plan and referred to the case of Panchen Lama, considered second in spiritual authority to the Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama had chosen the 11th Panchen Lama but he was taken into Chinese custody at the age of five about 25 years back and has not been heard since. Instead the Chinese foisted another Panchen Lama through a draw of lots. “How many follow him?’’ he asked.

Sangay felt the controversy over Ogyen Trinley Dorje is nearing an end and he felt that the head of one of the four schools of Buddhism will soon return to India. Dorje had left India in 2017 amid reports that he may not return due to ill-treatment by authorities here. “He will return. The Indian government has done a lot for him. There was some misunderstanding but for the last six or seven years his treatment has become better,’’ he observed.

Sangay also sounded a note of caution against allowing Chinese to gain influence. Making the observation on the basis of what he had experienced in several countries including Australia, South Africa and Norway, he said the Chinese act with impunity and brooked no dissent.

Sangay played down the absence of an invite to attend the second swearing in ceremony of PM Modi and felt the invitation for his first swearing in was in itself unexpected. “It was an exception. Chinese pressure is always there. It is understandable and I have no complaints. Wherever I go abroad, they send people to protest. But we are not scared of China.’’

Commenting on the situation in Hong Kong, the Tibetan political leader with a doctorate from Harvard University, said democracy is universal and inevitable. “We are in solidarity,’’ he said.

Drolma

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2019, 10:05:31 AM »
It is sad that the Dalai Lama still is not able to return to Tibet. India only has given the Tibetans permission to stay only for a limited amount of time. So what will happen when time is over?

Are the Tibetans so well seen in India that they will get a longer stay? I doubt it with all the events in Delhi cancelled ...
After all, the Tibetans could become Indians as there is no hope to get Tibet back. Especially with their tendency to call the Chinese people all kind of names...

With the Dalai Lama growing older, there is little hope for the Tibetans under the CTA.

It is already a know fact that the CTA will not be able to bring the Tibetans back to Tibet. They don't even have the intention to do that. They want Tibetans to remain as refugees so they can continue to use the refugee status to get free money.

India is also showing their dislike with what the Tibetans are doing in India, which is the constant protest against China. This has caused distress to the relationship of India and China. For the sake of the Indian people and India, Indian government has decided not to be closely associated with the Tibetans. This can be seen from a leaked government document where Indian officials were told not to attend events organised by the CTA.

It is stupid for the Tibetans to put their hope in the CTA or Lobsang Sangay because they are not doing anything good for them. It is better to just leave the Tibetan community in India, either they go back to Tibet or migrate to other countries.

Alex

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2019, 12:13:08 PM »
Well thanks to Lobsang Sangay.... Dalai Lama can sure kiss going back to Tibet good bye!

Sangay said, acknowledging that “the Chinese plan is to create confusion among the Tibetans with the emergence of two Dalai Lamas, one nominated by them and the other by Tibetan exiles.” Funny Lobsang Sangay should mention that since they were the ones who started this tradition of confusion and double-ups in recognition.

He also slams current China’s Panchen Lama and arrogant asks “How many follow him?’’ I think he needs to do go back to school to calculate how many exile Tibetans are there versus how many actual Tibetans there are in Tibet (6 million vs 120 over thousands)

He also made a bold comment that Ogyen Trinley Dorje saying that “He will return as the Indian government has done a lot for him. There was some misunderstanding but for the last six or seven years his treatment has become better”. And he had the cheek to claim that the CTA is democratic and hence stands in solidarity with the recent Hong Kong’s protest.
   

Quote
Buddhists won’t accept a Chinese Dalai Lama: President of Tibetan Government-in-exile
https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nation/buddhists-won-t-accept-a-chinese-dalai-lama-president-of-tibetan-government-in-exile/813870.html

Sandeep Dikshit
Tribune News Service
New Delhi, August 6

President of theTibetan Government-in-exile Lobsang Sangay is confident that Buddhists will not accept any Chinese move to foist the 5th Dalai Lama.

“That’s the Chinese plan,’’ he said about recent Chinese claims that the successor to the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso will be chosen by Beijing. “We are talking of reincarnation of the Dalai Lama’s consciousness and soul. Look at the Chinese government’s track record which has always vilified the present Dalai Lama. Who will accept their claim? How many Tibetans will follow a Chinese Dalai Lama?,’’ he said, acknowledging that the Chinese plan is to create confusion among the Tibetans with the emergence of two Dalai Lamas, one nominated by them and the other by Tibetan exiles.

Asked if there can be two Dalai Lamas, he felt that is the Chinese game plan and referred to the case of Panchen Lama, considered second in spiritual authority to the Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama had chosen the 11th Panchen Lama but he was taken into Chinese custody at the age of five about 25 years back and has not been heard since. Instead the Chinese foisted another Panchen Lama through a draw of lots. “How many follow him?’’ he asked.

Sangay felt the controversy over Ogyen Trinley Dorje is nearing an end and he felt that the head of one of the four schools of Buddhism will soon return to India. Dorje had left India in 2017 amid reports that he may not return due to ill-treatment by authorities here. “He will return. The Indian government has done a lot for him. There was some misunderstanding but for the last six or seven years his treatment has become better,’’ he observed.

Sangay also sounded a note of caution against allowing Chinese to gain influence. Making the observation on the basis of what he had experienced in several countries including Australia, South Africa and Norway, he said the Chinese act with impunity and brooked no dissent.

Sangay played down the absence of an invite to attend the second swearing in ceremony of PM Modi and felt the invitation for his first swearing in was in itself unexpected. “It was an exception. Chinese pressure is always there. It is understandable and I have no complaints. Wherever I go abroad, they send people to protest. But we are not scared of China.’’

Commenting on the situation in Hong Kong, the Tibetan political leader with a doctorate from Harvard University, said democracy is universal and inevitable. “We are in solidarity,’’ he said.

Lobsang Sangay has been sabotaging His Holiness's effort in going back to Tibet. Even after His Holiness, the Dalai Lama had announced that Tibetans should aim for Umaylam and not Rangzen. His Holiness does not want independence for Tibet and wants the Tibetan to work with China to ensure a good future.

However, Lobsang Sangay deliberately goes against His Holiness's instructions and go around the globe preaching about Tibetan cause and how bad China is for bullying Tibetans in Tibet. In reality, China is helping the Tibetans in Tibet.

By the end of this year, China will be able to totally eradicate poverty in Tibet which is a huge achievement. China had invested so much into Tibet to make it a better place. Many Tibetans are able to escape poverty because of the new government.

Pema8

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2019, 04:41:56 PM »
It is so sad that after suffering so much from losing their country, the Tibetans are stuck as refugees because their Tibetan Government in exile is not able to put their people first.

So many disappointments the Tibetans are faced with from not having religious freedom, and the sad consequences related to family, friends and living, as Dorje Shugden practitioners, to being a refugee for more than 60 years and not being able to live a decent normal life.

The Tibetans have lost over the years because of bad decisions and consequently they lose more and more support in every country. Very sad!
 

Alex

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Re: The Dalai Lama on Trump, women and going home
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2019, 07:42:27 AM »
It is so sad that after suffering so much from losing their country, the Tibetans are stuck as refugees because their Tibetan Government in exile is not able to put their people first.

So many disappointments the Tibetans are faced with from not having religious freedom, and the sad consequences related to family, friends and living, as Dorje Shugden practitioners, to being a refugee for more than 60 years and not being able to live a decent normal life.

The Tibetans have lost over the years because of bad decisions and consequently they lose more and more support in every country. Very sad!

If CTA did not waste their time on creating useless policy such as Dorje Shugden ban, they might be back in Tibet sooner than we thought. However, they just go around and wasting their precious time and energy on something that cannot help with their cause.

On the other hand, the problems that CTA created is tearing the community apart and the unity is destroyed. It is very hard for a community to move on or achieve something if they do not have unity. Hence, it is CTA's fault that the Tibetans are still living in India as refugees.

At the end of the day, everyone knows that it is CTA's fault that Tibet is still under China and that is why the donations is going down and getting lesser each year. If CTA thinks they can fool the foreigners into giving them donations by sounding pitiful, they will soon realise how wrong they are.