Author Topic: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?  (Read 668 times)

michaela

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Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« on: April 11, 2018, 08:31:37 PM »
This article described how much Nepal favour China over India:

> Recently Nepal Prime Minister Oli, talked of the ballooning deficit with India, conveniently overlooking the fact that Nepal’s trade deficit with China is 44:1, whereas with India it is 10:1.

> Before departing for India on a state visit, Prime Minister Oli said that he would not sign anything against the interest of the nation, and reiterating it in his interview to the Indian press, suggested gratuitously that India seeks to pressure Nepalese leaders to sign agreements against their national interest.

> Prime Minister Oli dismisses the danger of China’s infrastructure building in other countries carrying the risk of debt entrapment as an Indian perception born of India-China rivalry, ignoring that US, Japan, France and the EU have expressed such concerns too. 

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India's ties with Nepal will remain difficult until it stops playing us with China

Kathmandu has used the Beijing card against us for decades irrespective of which political party has been in power.

Under Prime Minister Khadga Prasad Oli the undercurrents of India-Nepal ties will remain troubled despite his just-concluded visit to India.

In the wake of his electoral success, Oli has been rather upfront publicly about his vexed feelings towards India even when greater discretion would have served him and future ties with India better.

His interview to a Hong Kong-based newspaper after assuming office contained themes that portended continuing tensions with India, be it his determination to revive the $2.5 billion (Rs 16,200 crore) Budhi Gandaki project (allotted to China) that the preceding Nepali Congress government had cancelled, increasing infrastructure connectivity with China in order to lessen Nepal’s reliance on India and updating relations with India “in keeping with the times”, including a possible “correction” of the longstanding practice of Gurkha recruitment to serve in the Indian army, and so on.

China connections

He has waxed eloquent about China extending its railway network in Tibet to Nepal and connecting it to Nepal’s east-west rail project, which he felt could “revolutionise China-India trade, with Nepal in the middle”, unmindful that such talks back China’s strategy of entrenching itself more deeply south of the Himalayas and ignores India’s security concerns.

Oli’s interviews to the Indian press before his arrival were needlessly combative and contentious. He insisted that Nepal wanted only friendship from India, implying that India has not been friendly towards Nepal. He has harped on India’s interference in Nepal’s internal affairs. He has asked for the revision the 1950 treaty that “hurts and pinches the Nepalese people” because of its unequal nature, making light of the enormous advantages that Nepal derives from it.

His assurance to his people before departing for India that he will not sign anything against the interest of the nation, and reiterating it in his interview to the Indian press, suggested gratuitously that India seeks to pressure Nepalese leaders to sign agreements against their national interest.

He has unfairly thrown the blame for the non-implementation of the Pancheshwar and Mahakali projects exclusively on India. His vision of Nepal connecting to the seas through India and China lacks realism. Because of the constraints of its own geography China wants access to the Indian Ocean through Pakistan and Myanmar, but here is Oli dreaming of access to the Pacific Ocean through China!

Oli dismisses the danger of China’s infrastructure building in other countries carrying the risk of debt entrapment as an Indian perception born of India-China rivalry, ignoring that US, Japan, France and the EU have expressed such concerns too. He asserted that he would not make any agreement against Nepal’s national interest.

Such over-confidence in the capacity of the Nepalese political class, financial experts and bureaucracy in dealing with China’s methods and allurements seems misplaced, especially when the US and Europe are unable to handle China’s “predatory economics”. His position on holding the SAARC summit disregards that of India. Oli talks of the ballooning deficit with India, conveniently overlooking the fact that Nepal’s trade deficit with China is 44:1, whereas with India it is 10:1.

Expanding ties

India is willing to engage with Oli, however grating his views may be. Modi has reportedly spoken to Oli three times since he won the elections. Sushma Swaraj has visited Nepal in February with a message of cooperation. Oli’s decision to visit India on his first trip abroad after assuming office is a positive gesture, but not too much should be read into it.

He could well view this gesture as according him space to expand ties with China. It would seem from the rather bareboned joint statement issued on the occasion of Oli’s visit that while in private talks between him and Modi the air may have been cleared and some mutual confidence built, no breakthrough in relations has occurred.

A new partnership in agriculture, a project to connect Raxaul to Kathmandu by rail, and a new connectivity with Nepal through inland waterways have been announced. These are long gestation projects which when implemented would tie the two countries and economies closer, but in the immediate, they will have limited impact on the overall quality of bilateral relations or the pro-China proclivities of the Oli government.

Political offensive

If Oli establishes the rail links with China, our Raxaul-Kathmandu rail project will only help him achieve his vision of connecting China and India with Nepal in the middle. If the Budhi-Gandaki project is revived and India refuses to buy power from any project in Nepal not built by Indian companies, we will come under attack for impeding Nepal’s development.

Some of Oli’s statements at the civic reception in his honour at Delhi show that his political offensive against India continues. He spoke of obstructing the free movement of goods, services and people as having no place in today’s interconnected world, overlooking Pakistan’s denial of such movement from India to Afghanistan as a SAARC country, as well as China’s obstruction of Outer Mongolia’s truck traffic as punishment for its decision to inviting the Dalai Lama

In sum, our relationship with Nepal will remain difficult. We have to manage it as best as we can because of Nepal’s acute sensitivity over issues of sovereignty and deep-seated suspicion about our interference in its internal affairs. Nepal has played the China card against us for decades irrespective of which political party has been in power in Kathmandu. This will continue.

https://www.dailyo.in/politics/indo-nepal-ties-china-diplomacy-kp-oli-narendra-modi/story/1/23378.html

Rowntree

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2018, 12:34:11 PM »
Oli is definitely ending India's monopoly in his country by welcoming China into various areas to boost its development. Nepal has been aligning themselves with China since 2005 by shutting down two major Tibetan exiles' organisations to close down in Kathmandu. One represented Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, and the other a group working for Tibetan refugees. It was even more obvious since the earthquake in 2015 that the Chinese send millions of aids and helped Nepal to rebuilt many of the important pilgrimage sites, including the Boudhanath stupa. With obvious benefits from China, India is lacking far behind and is incompatible with what the Chinese had and have to offer. India herself is also aligning with the Chinese command and lowering themselves to receive benefits from the bilateral ties that they needed badly. This is why India has stopped playing the Tibet card against China. Everyone is kowtowing China and this is the truth we cannot deny.

Tracy

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2019, 07:41:28 AM »
Nepal does not have a lot of natural resources, it relies a lot on the neighbouring countries to provide natural resources such as oil and gas. If India does not use oil and gas to 'control' Nepal, Nepal will not play the China card.

To be honest, who likes to be controlled by another person and always have the fear of not getting the necessity needed for the country? If China can help to solve the problem Nepal is facing, why not building a better relationship with China?

In terms of culture and language, Nepal and India are very similar. India should help Nepal whenever possible, not to use the oil and gas to threaten Nepal. Nepal is a poor country, an increase of price in oil and gas will add more burden to the people and the country. Nepal has no choice but to befriend China.

Drolma

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2019, 07:24:32 AM »
Nepal does not have a lot of natural resources, it relies a lot on the neighbouring countries to provide natural resources such as oil and gas. If India does not use oil and gas to 'control' Nepal, Nepal will not play the China card.

To be honest, who likes to be controlled by another person and always have the fear of not getting the necessity needed for the country? If China can help to solve the problem Nepal is facing, why not building a better relationship with China?

In terms of culture and language, Nepal and India are very similar. India should help Nepal whenever possible, not to use the oil and gas to threaten Nepal. Nepal is a poor country, an increase of price in oil and gas will add more burden to the people and the country. Nepal has no choice but to befriend China.

Ever since Nepal has established a better foreign relationship with China, there are more Chinese tourists and businessmen in Kathmandu. There are definitely some benefits Nepal get when it becomes friendly with China.

The influx of Chinese tourists has stimulated the economy of Nepal. When Chinese tourists go to Nepal, they will spend money buying things, on accommodations, and food and drinks. Many businessmen also come here to do purchase for their business in China.

However, the Nepalese government has to be careful as well, with the increase of Chinese tourists and businessmen, price of items such as property, food and drinks will increase as well. This might become a burden to the poorer Nepalis.

dsnowlion

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2019, 07:02:43 AM »
It is just a matter of time that China would ask and expect Nepal to sign an extradition treaty and it is happening now. Obviously, this is making exile Tibetans and the CTA very worried. Nepal is like a 2nd home to many Tibetans and with this treaty, they will have to be extra careful. It will be stricter for the Tibetans now. There will be many restrictions on them. Not so easy life anymore.

Like how they restricted Shugdenpas, now they are being restricted and watched! Definitely no more protest, Free Tibet dramas and trouble from the Tibetans, time for them to just toe the line if they wish to live in peace and not get arrested.


Quote
Tibetans in Nepal 'sitting ducks' as China presses Kathmandu to sign extradition treaty

DHARAMSHALA, Oct. 8: Tibetan exiles in Nepal are set to be further endangered as Beijing is pressing the Kathmandu government to sign an extradition treaty during the Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the country in mid October for talks.

The extradition treaty if signed will allow the two nations to extradite criminals or suspected individuals. China will most likely target exile Tibetans in Nepal, many of whom are already restricted over the years following China’s growing influence in the small Himalayan country.

Kathmandu based Khabarhub reported on October 4 that a draft of the treaty has been prepared and that a Council of Ministers needs to endorse it before it is signed. While there is no confirmation if the Nepalese cabinet has approved the treaty or not but Beijing is adamant that the two countries put pen to paper during Xi’s visit to Nepal in the next few days.

Khabarhub cited an unnamed expert warning the Kathmandu government to not sign the treaty under pressure. “While Nepal has not endorsed such an agreement with India, China is pressing Nepal to sign the treaty during the high-level visit. Such issue is of serious nature and treaties of this nature need to be discussed thoroughly across the political spectrum before being finalized,” the expert said.

Researcher at Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy Tenzin Dawa told Phayul that such a treaty will be detrimental to Tibetans in Nepal. She said, “If a treaty of this nature gets passed, it is imperative that Nepal government should take into account the international human rights standards particularly the principle of non-refoulement of international refugee law. Signing extradition bill would definitely show how The judicial independence of Nepal is at stake.

“Nepal in the past have not been a safe country for Tibetan refugees to reside moreover, I think the human rights situation of Tibetans will be worse given the no. of undocumented Tibetans.”

Phayul has also learned that over 80 Tibetans in Nepal have already been blacklisted ahead of the Chinese President’s visit to the country. A source also told Phayul that people who have earlier been associated with pro-Tibet activities and even celebration of the Dalai Lama’s birthday will be either detained or kept under close supervision by Nepalese special forces during the entirety of Xi’s visit.

China’s push in gaining extradition passage in other countries for so-called “criminals” has been severely criticised as a tool for Beijing to target dissidents and pro-democracy activists. The ongoing clash between Hong Kong residents and the police was sparked by pressure from Beijing to pass a legislation that allows extradition of individuals from Hong Kong to China.

Source: http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=41837&article=Tibetans+in+Nepal+%27sitting+ducks%27+as+China+presses+Kathmandu+to+sign+extradition+treaty

Tracy

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2019, 07:11:32 AM »
It is just a matter of time that China would ask and expect Nepal to sign an extradition treaty and it is happening now. Obviously, this is making exile Tibetans and the CTA very worried. Nepal is like a 2nd home to many Tibetans and with this treaty, they will have to be extra careful. It will be stricter for the Tibetans now. There will be many restrictions on them. Not so easy life anymore.

Like how they restricted Shugdenpas, now they are being restricted and watched! Definitely no more protest, Free Tibet dramas and trouble from the Tibetans, time for them to just toe the line if they wish to live in peace and not get arrested.


Quote
Tibetans in Nepal 'sitting ducks' as China presses Kathmandu to sign extradition treaty

DHARAMSHALA, Oct. 8: Tibetan exiles in Nepal are set to be further endangered as Beijing is pressing the Kathmandu government to sign an extradition treaty during the Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the country in mid October for talks.

The extradition treaty if signed will allow the two nations to extradite criminals or suspected individuals. China will most likely target exile Tibetans in Nepal, many of whom are already restricted over the years following China’s growing influence in the small Himalayan country.

Kathmandu based Khabarhub reported on October 4 that a draft of the treaty has been prepared and that a Council of Ministers needs to endorse it before it is signed. While there is no confirmation if the Nepalese cabinet has approved the treaty or not but Beijing is adamant that the two countries put pen to paper during Xi’s visit to Nepal in the next few days.

Khabarhub cited an unnamed expert warning the Kathmandu government to not sign the treaty under pressure. “While Nepal has not endorsed such an agreement with India, China is pressing Nepal to sign the treaty during the high-level visit. Such issue is of serious nature and treaties of this nature need to be discussed thoroughly across the political spectrum before being finalized,” the expert said.

Researcher at Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy Tenzin Dawa told Phayul that such a treaty will be detrimental to Tibetans in Nepal. She said, “If a treaty of this nature gets passed, it is imperative that Nepal government should take into account the international human rights standards particularly the principle of non-refoulement of international refugee law. Signing extradition bill would definitely show how The judicial independence of Nepal is at stake.

“Nepal in the past have not been a safe country for Tibetan refugees to reside moreover, I think the human rights situation of Tibetans will be worse given the no. of undocumented Tibetans.”

Phayul has also learned that over 80 Tibetans in Nepal have already been blacklisted ahead of the Chinese President’s visit to the country. A source also told Phayul that people who have earlier been associated with pro-Tibet activities and even celebration of the Dalai Lama’s birthday will be either detained or kept under close supervision by Nepalese special forces during the entirety of Xi’s visit.

China’s push in gaining extradition passage in other countries for so-called “criminals” has been severely criticised as a tool for Beijing to target dissidents and pro-democracy activists. The ongoing clash between Hong Kong residents and the police was sparked by pressure from Beijing to pass a legislation that allows extradition of individuals from Hong Kong to China.

Source: http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=41837&article=Tibetans+in+Nepal+%27sitting+ducks%27+as+China+presses+Kathmandu+to+sign+extradition+treaty



The extradition treaty is mainly targeting at Tibetans who are creating troubles for China. Since 1959, Nepal and India have been the nearest countries a Tibetan can run to. But since Nepal has established a closer relationship with China, they have close down the Tibet Office. Not only that, Nepal is also distancing themselves away from Tibet.

It makes a lot of sense for Nepal to work with China. China can bring benefit to Nepal, but what can the Tibetans do for Nepal? They are using the resources of Nepal but not contributing anything. Nepal is not a rich country, they will not be able to support the Tibetans.

The CTA has to face the fact that more and more countries will not want to be associated with the Tibetans. Instead of going against China, the CTA and Tibetans should work with China. They have to understand they don't have the capability to run a country of millions of people. Be part of China brings more benefits to the Tibetans as China is financially strong and they have already invested so much in the economic development in Tibet.

Drolma

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2019, 07:25:01 AM »
It is just a matter of time that China would ask and expect Nepal to sign an extradition treaty and it is happening now. Obviously, this is making exile Tibetans and the CTA very worried. Nepal is like a 2nd home to many Tibetans and with this treaty, they will have to be extra careful. It will be stricter for the Tibetans now. There will be many restrictions on them. Not so easy life anymore.

Like how they restricted Shugdenpas, now they are being restricted and watched! Definitely no more protest, Free Tibet dramas and trouble from the Tibetans, time for them to just toe the line if they wish to live in peace and not get arrested.


Quote
Tibetans in Nepal 'sitting ducks' as China presses Kathmandu to sign extradition treaty

DHARAMSHALA, Oct. 8: Tibetan exiles in Nepal are set to be further endangered as Beijing is pressing the Kathmandu government to sign an extradition treaty during the Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the country in mid October for talks.

The extradition treaty if signed will allow the two nations to extradite criminals or suspected individuals. China will most likely target exile Tibetans in Nepal, many of whom are already restricted over the years following China’s growing influence in the small Himalayan country.

Kathmandu based Khabarhub reported on October 4 that a draft of the treaty has been prepared and that a Council of Ministers needs to endorse it before it is signed. While there is no confirmation if the Nepalese cabinet has approved the treaty or not but Beijing is adamant that the two countries put pen to paper during Xi’s visit to Nepal in the next few days.

Khabarhub cited an unnamed expert warning the Kathmandu government to not sign the treaty under pressure. “While Nepal has not endorsed such an agreement with India, China is pressing Nepal to sign the treaty during the high-level visit. Such issue is of serious nature and treaties of this nature need to be discussed thoroughly across the political spectrum before being finalized,” the expert said.

Researcher at Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy Tenzin Dawa told Phayul that such a treaty will be detrimental to Tibetans in Nepal. She said, “If a treaty of this nature gets passed, it is imperative that Nepal government should take into account the international human rights standards particularly the principle of non-refoulement of international refugee law. Signing extradition bill would definitely show how The judicial independence of Nepal is at stake.

“Nepal in the past have not been a safe country for Tibetan refugees to reside moreover, I think the human rights situation of Tibetans will be worse given the no. of undocumented Tibetans.”

Phayul has also learned that over 80 Tibetans in Nepal have already been blacklisted ahead of the Chinese President’s visit to the country. A source also told Phayul that people who have earlier been associated with pro-Tibet activities and even celebration of the Dalai Lama’s birthday will be either detained or kept under close supervision by Nepalese special forces during the entirety of Xi’s visit.

China’s push in gaining extradition passage in other countries for so-called “criminals” has been severely criticised as a tool for Beijing to target dissidents and pro-democracy activists. The ongoing clash between Hong Kong residents and the police was sparked by pressure from Beijing to pass a legislation that allows extradition of individuals from Hong Kong to China.

Source: http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=41837&article=Tibetans+in+Nepal+%27sitting+ducks%27+as+China+presses+Kathmandu+to+sign+extradition+treaty



The CTA and the Tibetans must be very worried now. If Nepal signed the extradition treaty, Tibetans who are seen as the separatists by China will not be able to go to Nepal. If they are caught in Nepal, they will be sent back to Tibet for persecution.

To cut the ties with the Tibetans is also something very worrying. Now, the extradition treaty. Will Nepal sign it? Actually, why not? There are also many Chinese citizens in Nepal now. Some Chinese have committed crimes in Nepal, with the extradition treaty, the Nepalese government will be able to track the criminal down and have them charge in Nepal.

The extradition treaty may not be entirely for the Tibetans or will only benefit China, it can benefit Nepal too. The CTA has to be more alert now because they may no longer be able to run to Nepal to hide. The Tibetans are losing more support every day. I wonder what will Lobsang Sangay do?

Tenzin K

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Re: Is Nepal Playing China Card Against India?
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2019, 05:48:32 AM »
The situation is getting hot for Tibetan and Dalai Lama. Due to China's influences, many countries will be pressured. The extradition treaty is very dangerous and this will extra control over China and will be very dangerous for many Tibetans. China is starting to expand its control and I believe it's more to come. 

CTA really has to do something with China else situation for Tibetan and Dalai Lama will only get bad to worse.

It is just a matter of time that China would ask and expect Nepal to sign an extradition treaty and it is happening now. Obviously, this is making exile Tibetans and the CTA very worried. Nepal is like a 2nd home to many Tibetans and with this treaty, they will have to be extra careful. It will be stricter for the Tibetans now. There will be many restrictions on them. Not so easy life anymore.

Like how they restricted Shugdenpas, now they are being restricted and watched! Definitely no more protest, Free Tibet dramas and trouble from the Tibetans, time for them to just toe the line if they wish to live in peace and not get arrested.


Quote
Tibetans in Nepal 'sitting ducks' as China presses Kathmandu to sign extradition treaty

DHARAMSHALA, Oct. 8: Tibetan exiles in Nepal are set to be further endangered as Beijing is pressing the Kathmandu government to sign an extradition treaty during the Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the country in mid October for talks.

The extradition treaty if signed will allow the two nations to extradite criminals or suspected individuals. China will most likely target exile Tibetans in Nepal, many of whom are already restricted over the years following China’s growing influence in the small Himalayan country.

Kathmandu based Khabarhub reported on October 4 that a draft of the treaty has been prepared and that a Council of Ministers needs to endorse it before it is signed. While there is no confirmation if the Nepalese cabinet has approved the treaty or not but Beijing is adamant that the two countries put pen to paper during Xi’s visit to Nepal in the next few days.

Khabarhub cited an unnamed expert warning the Kathmandu government to not sign the treaty under pressure. “While Nepal has not endorsed such an agreement with India, China is pressing Nepal to sign the treaty during the high-level visit. Such issue is of serious nature and treaties of this nature need to be discussed thoroughly across the political spectrum before being finalized,” the expert said.

Researcher at Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy Tenzin Dawa told Phayul that such a treaty will be detrimental to Tibetans in Nepal. She said, “If a treaty of this nature gets passed, it is imperative that Nepal government should take into account the international human rights standards particularly the principle of non-refoulement of international refugee law. Signing extradition bill would definitely show how The judicial independence of Nepal is at stake.

“Nepal in the past have not been a safe country for Tibetan refugees to reside moreover, I think the human rights situation of Tibetans will be worse given the no. of undocumented Tibetans.”

Phayul has also learned that over 80 Tibetans in Nepal have already been blacklisted ahead of the Chinese President’s visit to the country. A source also told Phayul that people who have earlier been associated with pro-Tibet activities and even celebration of the Dalai Lama’s birthday will be either detained or kept under close supervision by Nepalese special forces during the entirety of Xi’s visit.

China’s push in gaining extradition passage in other countries for so-called “criminals” has been severely criticised as a tool for Beijing to target dissidents and pro-democracy activists. The ongoing clash between Hong Kong residents and the police was sparked by pressure from Beijing to pass a legislation that allows extradition of individuals from Hong Kong to China.

Source: http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=41837&article=Tibetans+in+Nepal+%27sitting+ducks%27+as+China+presses+Kathmandu+to+sign+extradition+treaty



The CTA and the Tibetans must be very worried now. If Nepal signed the extradition treaty, Tibetans who are seen as the separatists by China will not be able to go to Nepal. If they are caught in Nepal, they will be sent back to Tibet for persecution.

To cut the ties with the Tibetans is also something very worrying. Now, the extradition treaty. Will Nepal sign it? Actually, why not? There are also many Chinese citizens in Nepal now. Some Chinese have committed crimes in Nepal, with the extradition treaty, the Nepalese government will be able to track the criminal down and have them charge in Nepal.

The extradition treaty may not be entirely for the Tibetans or will only benefit China, it can benefit Nepal too. The CTA has to be more alert now because they may no longer be able to run to Nepal to hide. The Tibetans are losing more support every day. I wonder what will Lobsang Sangay do?