Author Topic: Ed Miliband reveals Zen Buddhism helps him cope with pressures of politics  (Read 5997 times)

Ensapa

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Buddhism is actually going mainstream now. Even the ministers are doing it to help them cope with their stress. A shallow reason, but at least it does plant seeds for the future....do rejoice that Buddhism is getting more popular. Lets hope that it would help inspire more people to be Buddhists!

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Ed Miliband reveals Zen Buddhism helps him cope with pressures of frontline politics

British Labour Party leader Ed Miliband has revealed that he uses a philosophy based on ancient Zen Buddhism to help him cope with the pressures of frontline politics.

He said that he tried to ‘follow his instinct’ because ‘doing what you believe’ was the way to cope with modern politics.

Miliband said that he used his instincts to stay focused on things that matter during times of difficulty and tried to stay ‘stoical’.

According to the Daily Mail, he disclosed how his personal philosophy mirrors that of Zen Buddhists who believe that you can achieve enlightenment by understanding the meaning of life.

Those who practice the philosophy, which originated in 6th century in China, use meditation and chanting to help them achieve this aim, the report said.

Miliband said that his wife Justine and his family were the most important thing in his life.

“I think what you learn most of all is, er - is it Zen? I''m not sure Zen is quite right, but I'm a pretty stoical guy. You know it''s not a walk in the park but I''m sanguine,” Miliband said.

“I know that conventional wisdom can swing one way, it can swing the other. I think I''ve just got to keep doing what I think is right and setting out my agenda. I think it''s the right agenda for the country,” Miliband said.

According to the report, Miliband also revealed how he had deliberately left his mobile phone in London to escape the pressures of his job and avoided all newspapers and television news during his summer break.

“I think what you learn most of all is, er - is it Zen? I''m not sure Zen is quite right, but I''m a pretty stoical guy,” he said.

“It was such a relief and a liberation not having a phone. Those who wanted to contact him were told to ring his wife, Justine, which of course they were reluctant to do,” Miliband added.

He also dismissed recent reports of tension between himself and his shadow chancellor Ed Balls.

According to the report, a spokesman for Miliband insisted he had not studied Zen Buddhism, but he said: “What he means is that you keep your focus on what you are trying to do. Politics is not just a career, it is about having a set of values about who you are and what you want to do”.