Author Topic: pictures  (Read 299749 times)

vajralight

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Re: pictures
« Reply #135 on: May 31, 2009, 12:51:43 PM »
from: http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/approaching_buddhism/teachers/tsenzhab_serkong_rinpoche/portrait_serkong_rinpoche.html

Rinpoche's Life and Personality
Tsenzhab Serkong Rinpoche was a massive man – a monk with shaved head, red robes, and a deeply lined face that made him look more ancient than his years. His humble, wise manner and gentle humor made him appear like the archetypal sage of fables. This quality did not escape the notice of Westerners who met him. Upon seeing him in Dharamsala, for instance, the makers of the popular film StarWars decided to use him as the model for Yoda, the spiritual guide of the epic. Rinpoche never saw the movie, but would undoubtedly have been amused at the caricature.

Mohani

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Re: pictures
« Reply #136 on: June 05, 2009, 06:39:54 PM »
More Zong Rinpoche in the UK.. ;)

Mohani

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Re: pictures
« Reply #137 on: June 23, 2009, 07:29:09 PM »
 More from Madhayamaka Centre :)
« Last Edit: June 23, 2009, 07:32:03 PM by Mohani »

RIME

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Re: pictures
« Reply #138 on: July 06, 2009, 01:14:43 PM »
KYABJE TOMO GESHE RINPOCHE.

RIME

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Re: pictures
« Reply #139 on: July 06, 2009, 01:32:55 PM »
KYABJE DOMO GESHE RINPOCHE NGAWANG KESANG . mardung( mummyfied )at Dungkar Gompa before chinese invasion.

emptymountains

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Re: pictures
« Reply #140 on: October 07, 2009, 12:38:09 PM »
Taken from Tibetan Paintings: the Jucker Collection (p. 127) by Hugo Kreijger & Ernst Jucker. Email me if you would like the full thangkha image (7mb), to save on website traffic.


yedi

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Re: pictures
« Reply #141 on: October 07, 2009, 05:56:28 PM »
Taken from Tibetan Paintings: the Jucker Collection (p. 127) by Hugo Kreijger & Ernst Jucker. Email me if you would like the full thangkha image (7mb), to save on website traffic.


Oh, I wanted to post the next days the same  :o
Gonsar Rinpoche gave a few days before a copy to me and I hanged it over my bed ... are you from my monastery? I am still not sure about the protector in the middle right from Dorje Shugden. In the description it is said to be Pehar but it looks much more like Dorje Legpa.

emptymountains

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Re: pictures
« Reply #142 on: October 07, 2009, 08:35:16 PM »
No, I'm a lay practitioner in the US. Do you have the book?

P.S. Does anyone have a picture of Buddha Vairochana in the seven-point meditation posture? None of the images I have found online have him with his hands in the mudra of meditative equipoise. Even a line drawing would be okay.

a friend

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Re: pictures
« Reply #143 on: October 07, 2009, 10:19:31 PM »
Hi emptymountains, Could you post the whole picture but much smaller, to see it complete (and if possible lighter too)?
Guru Rinpoche as usual so handsome. The Protector too, incredibly beautiful face. Is he DSh? I miss the mongoose ...

Trinley Kelsang, I think Kyabje Rinpoche was in Dharamsala, at home, and in the other pic, I don't think it's him, do you have more information (the one with HH Paul VI)?

emptymountains

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Re: pictures
« Reply #144 on: October 08, 2009, 03:37:51 AM »
It is identified by the author as "Dorje Shug" [sic], dated early 19th century. It is already considerably lighter than the original, so I didn't want to "distort" too much.

P.S. Of particular interest to me also is the refuge tree of Tsongkhapa on page 26 (18th century, i.e. 1700s). I do not see Dorje Shugden pictured there, but I think I do see Vajrayogini. I wonder if that says anything about her place in the Gelugpa tradition at that time.

« Last Edit: October 08, 2009, 03:47:21 AM by emptymountains »

Robert Thomas

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Re: pictures
« Reply #145 on: October 08, 2009, 08:28:14 AM »
Hi there,

I had  look throught the book online http://www.himalayanart.org/pages/jucker.html and also in Google books - there are several references to Dorje Shug - one from the 17th Century. It would indeed be interesting to see if the Dorje Shug and Dorje Shugden are one and the same. I have no way of verifying however - but perhaps one of you scholars or yogis can  :D

yedi

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Re: pictures
« Reply #146 on: October 08, 2009, 10:58:33 AM »
Hi there,

I had  look throught the book online http://www.himalayanart.org/pages/jucker.html and also in Google books - there are several references to Dorje Shug - one from the 17th Century. It would indeed be interesting to see if the Dorje Shug and Dorje Shugden are one and the same. I have no way of verifying however - but perhaps one of you scholars or yogis can  :D


Gonsar Rinpoche gave me a copy of this picture as it is showing Dorje Shugden with Guru Padmasambhava over his head surrounded by other Dharmapalas who are typical for Nyingma tradition (probably not Dzogchen because on the top of the thangka is Chenresig and not Samantabhadra but it could refer to some other kind of Nyingma tantra. Of course I am not an expert in such things I just try to compare from my little background knowledge.)  So, if this picture refers to Dorje Shug then it's clearly the same as Dorje Shugden.

@emtymountains: We have this book in our bookstore at the present, I will try to borrow it for the afternoon and post the description text later. Gonsar Rinpoche told me that there are some little mistakes inside but I don't know which one. I just wondered about Pehar who seems to me much more similar to Dorje Legpa.

Robert Thomas

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Re: pictures
« Reply #147 on: October 08, 2009, 12:45:47 PM »
The other two prints with images of Dorje Shug are: Dhrtarashtra (p93) and Mahashribuddhaheruka (p139). The later dates from 17th century, I thought it was also valuable to find such an early depiction.

yedi

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Re: pictures
« Reply #148 on: October 08, 2009, 01:26:32 PM »
Now here's the description:

Dorje Shug
Central Tibet
Early 19th century
Distemper and gold cloth

The cult of Dorje Shug dates only from the 17th century when he became an important guardian deity of the Geluk order. 100  Interestingly, however, this painting, through the prominent representation of the 8th century founder of the Nyingma order, Padmasambhava, seems instead to be associated with that school of Tibetan Buddhism.
In the painting, the red god is shown in his monk's robes and wearing the sakshu (golden hat) 101
astride his mount, the white snow lion. In his hands he holds a human heart and a chula (dagger with a wave-shaped blade). The ensemble rest on a lotus and are backed by a flaming aureole. As in the previous painting, he is surrounded by a circle of deities, most of whom also have their own lotus thrones. They are (clockwise from 12 o' clock) Padmasambhava, the red, six armed dharmapala (defender of the faith) Hayagriva, the female emanation of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara – Sita (White) Tara, a red manifestation of Pehar on a white snow lion riding across a sea of blood, a six-armed manifestation of the dharmapala Mahakala, the dharmapala Shri Devi on her mule, a white six-armed manifestation of Pehar seated on a blue snow lion, the lokapala (guardian king) Vaishravana seated on a blue snow lion and holding a banner and jewel-spitting mongoose, the dharmapala Tsangpa Karpo (White Brahma), Buddha Amitayus, and the dark-blue dharmapala Yamantaka.
At the top centre of the painting is an image of Shadaksharilokeshvara, a white, four-armed manifestation of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. He is flanked by the bodhisattva of wisdom, Manjushri holding a sword and manuscript, and by a blue, wrathful form of the bodhisattva Vajrapani. At the bottom left of the painting is the rarely depicted guardian deity Namkha Barzin riding a horse and holding a lance and the lead of a trussed-up enemy of the Buddhist Law. In the opposite corner is the four-armed guardian Rahula with his half serpent body. Between both deities is the mountain goddess Yuchashogchikma riding a deer and recognisable by her attributes the mirror and arrow. She is surrounded by four assistants, all on horses riding amidst clouds. Flanking this small scene are several large kapala (skull cups) and conches filled with blood or human organs, which represent the five senses. In addition there is a chakra (wheel). The entire scene is set in a landscape of green, almost rolling hills with a few clouds at their peaks. The sky above is filled with darker cloud formations framing each of the deities in the upper third of the painting.
Although rather provincial in style, this painting has a lot of charm and displays a wealth of interesting iconographic detail. The beginning of the 19th century seems probable for its execution.


100 The origins and iconography of the deity are explained at length in Nebesky-Wojkowitz 1975, pp. 134-136
101  Nebesky-Wojkowitz, 1975, p.11



I think it should be clear also from the description that Dorje Shug and Dorje Shugden are the same. To be 100 % sure one could check Nebesky-Wojkowitz.


a friend

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Re: pictures
« Reply #149 on: October 09, 2009, 03:23:35 AM »
@emptymountains: What a tangka, incredible! Thank you for posting it.