Author Topic: Phra Sangkachai  (Read 11870 times)

Big Uncle

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Phra Sangkachai
« on: January 04, 2013, 05:35:00 AM »
Phra Sangkajai / Phra Sangkachai

In Thailand, Budai is sometimes confused with another similar monk widely respected in Thailand, Phra Sangkajai or Sangkachai. Phra Sangkajai, a Thai spelling of Mahakaccayanathera was a Buddhist Arhat (in Sanskrit) or Arahant (in Pali) during the time of the Lord Buddha. Lord Buddha praised Phra Sangkadchai for his excellence in explaining sophisticated dharma (or dhamma) in an easily and correctly understandable manner. Phra Sangkajai also composed the Madhupinadika Sutra.

One tale of the Thai folklore relates that he was so handsome that once even a man wanted him for a wife. To avoid a similar situation, Phra Sangkadchai decided to transform himself into a fat monk. Another tale says he was so attractive that angels and men often compared him with the Buddha. He considered this inappropriate, so disguised himself in an unpleasantly fat body.

Although both Budai and Phra Sangkajai may be found in both Thai and Chinese temples, Phra Sangkajai is found more often in Thai temples, and Budai in Chinese temples. Two points to distinguish them from one another are:
Phra Sangkajai has a trace of hair on his head (looking similar to the Buddha's) while Budai is clearly bald.
Phra Sangkajai wears the robes in Theravadin Buddhist fashion with the robes folded across one shoulder, leaving the other uncovered. Budai wears the robes in Chinese style, covering both arms but leaving the front part of the upper body uncovered.

Tenzin K

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Re: Phra Sangkachai
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2013, 04:32:51 PM »
Other points to distinguish them from one another are:
1.   In almost all Fat Monk Saccaka statuettes, he sits cross legged and his bare hands support his belly.   
        Budai images sometimes stand and often has mala beads string or gold bullion in his hands.
2.   The big wide laughing smile is the icon of all Budai Images. The Fat Monk images bear only a faint smile.

According to Chinese tradition, Budai was an eccentric Chinese Zen monk who lived during the Later Liang Dynasty (907 – 923 CE)  of China. He was a native of  Fenghua, and his Buddhist name was Qieci (Qieci; literally “Promise this“). He was considered a man of good and loving character. Budai in folklore is admired for his happiness, plenitude, and wisdom of contentment. One belief popular in folklore maintains that rubbing his belly brings wealth, good luck, and prosperity. In Japan, Budai is in folklore as one of the Seven Lucky Gods  (Shichi Fukujin) of Taoism.

RedLantern

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Re: Phra Sangkachai
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2013, 04:36:03 PM »
Some Buddhist traditions consider him a Buddha or Bodhisattva,often identifying him with Maitreya(the future
Buddha)His identification with the Maitreya is attributed to a Buddhist hymn he uttered before his death.
Maitreya,the true Maitreya has billions of incarnations.Often he is shown to people at other time.Sometimes,they don't recognized him. One tale of the Thai folklore relates that he was so handsome that once even a man wanted him for a wife.To avoid similar situation,Pra Sangkachai decided to transform himself into a fat monk.Another tale says he was so attractive that angels and men often compared him with the Buddha
He considered this inappropriate, so disguise himself in an unpleasantly fat body
In folklore,he is admired for his happiness,plenitude,and wisdom of contentment.One belief popular in folklore maintains that rubbing his belly  brings wealth,good luck  and prosperity