Author Topic: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"  (Read 7725 times)

Ensapa

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Here is an interesting perspective of CTA by a foreigner who has been staying in Dharamsala. These are what is causing CTA to fail. If they were progressive, they will see no reason to uphold the ban at all and even if they did, they would not do something really nasty to them like what they did. It seems that the Dorje Shugde practitioners are the one who is speaking up, and to not to have them in the Kashag is CTA's loss.

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"The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
Phayul[Sunday, August 19, 2012 17:12]
By Brent A Werner

Dharamsala, like all political centers, is awash in games. Nevertheless, I hope that a more mainstream audience will hear what I have to say, considering the merit of my points rather than my lack of power or prestige. For a few recent years I was a resident of Dharamsala, the husband of Tenzin Diki Werner, the son-in-law of Namse Chenmo la Phuntsok Tsering, an adoptive father to Tenzin Choedon Tsarong, and also the Father of Tenzin Sangmo Werner. I am not highly educated, nor am I a politician, but I have a Tibetan family, and I have been following the Tibetan political scene (and lack thereof) since I marched beside Takster Rinpoche in the mid 1990’s. These experiences afforded me the opportunity to come into direct and personal contact with the views of everyone from local garbage collectors, to Lodi Gyari Rinpoche, to Lhasang Tsering, to Tibetans visiting India from inside Tibet. My late wife, in her cheerful gregariousness, had a wide circle of friends. Thus, I came to a few political observations not so much through the study of books and treatises as through direct observation of various Tibetans, supplemented by news reports and a few academic books. My conclusion has been that, in order to effect a solution to the decimation, destruction, and impending disappearance of the Tibetan people, the fundamental worldview emerging from Dharamsala must change. Though I support Rangzen, my intention here is not to advocate specifically for Rangzen or for Ume Lam, but to point out that there must be a change in methodology before any desired outcome can be achieved.

PROBLEM 1: Magical thinking. The Tibetan people, and in particular, the Central Tibetan Administration, must abandon magical thinking. If CTA is going to follow a Middle Way policy, they owe it to the Tibetan people and the Tibet supporters to describe an efficient strategy to achieve this in a specified timeframe. After decades of “negotiations” that have failed to achieve even the slightest improvement in human rights, they owe us an honest explanation, as well as a corrective course. The current claim, namely that negotiation is the best strategy to resolve the conflict, relies on neither evidence nor logic. It draws its power from the Tibetan people’s remarkable faith in the person of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. That uniquely profound devotion should be a source of strength, yet the Tibetan government has allowed it to become their greatest weakness. Faith in His Holiness is manipulated so that Tibetan people wait endlessly, convinced that Chenrezig is their political savior and that they will somehow be saved by outside forces, or by anyone other than themselves. A more revolutionary approach, be it non-violent, or violently defensive, labels one something like a “heathen” who either does not understand Buddhism, or worse yet, has no devotion. In brief, the magical mentality so prominent among so many older Tibetans (and many of the youth) allows the government to evade all responsibility, criticism, and to remain unaccountable for their lack of progress.

I am a Buddhist. I believe that the Buddha, Milarepa, flew in the sky. I maintain that Tsongkhapa was an emanation of Guru Padmsambhava, and His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the most important emanation of Chenrezig for the Tibetan people. None of this makes me feel like I need to support a plan without a plan. Although a plan without a plan makes an interesting Zen koan, it is not the basis for a sound national policy. Chatting endlessly with mid-level Chinese Communist leaders while torture, cattle-prod rapes, and political executions go unabated does not even seem very Buddhist to me. Therefore, if the Central Tibetan Administration should like to regain the support of myself and other free-thinking individuals who understand directly the benefits of living in freedom, with rights and in one’s own nation, they will have to demonstrate a concrete plan within a specific timeframe to achieve an identifiable political goal. Whether a concretely outlined conciliatory approach would satisfy Rangzen advocates is another matter. However, at least the Tibetan government would stop looking stupid.

PROBLEM 2: Desire for comfort. I certainly applaud the successes of the Tibetan refugee community. In the communities I am most tied to, Dharamsala and the Washington D.C. area Tibetans, I have met numerous Tibetans who are smarter, more educated, kinder, more affluent, and certainly better human beings than I am. In Washington D.C., with Tibetan Sunday School and cultural programs, Tibetans do an amazingly good job of preserving Tibetan culture in a very different nation and environment. This is a success, and an admirable one, but like many successes, it has a downside. Affluent and comfortable people have a great deal to lose, and therefore may not want to believe a very simple truth. Any revolution, violent or non-violent, demands tremendous sacrifice, including sacrifice of life and blood. Although it is more comfortable to pretend to negotiate with a colonialist regime, the reality is that no colonialist empire is going to move until they are forced to. Yes, Gandhi drove out the British with a largely non-violent movement. However, Tibetans should refrain from citing and comparing their movement to Gandhi’s until they have a similarly strategic, mass movement of resistance, which they don’t. Moreover, I am not sure the nature of the CCP’s occupation can be compared to the British, and so scholars more astute than me would have to convene to decide what strategy of mass resistance (non-violent or defensive) would be most effective. Is there another option? There is.

When Ethiopia, a strong African nation, attempted to turn its occupation of Eritrea into a permanent incorporation of the country, Eritrea fought back. Eritrea had a mere 3 million people, and about 100,000 soldiers. Ethiopia received support from none other than the Americans, and later, the Russians. In fact, Russia sent so many tanks and weapons that Ethiopia could not even use all of them! There was a war of about thirty years, and Ethiopia lost to an Eritrean army living out of underground tunnels and camps. While Eritrea has since suffered innumerable woes, that is not the point. The point is that it is possible for a smaller, poorly equipped country to drive out a larger, colonialist empire. The Irish Republican Army, though sometimes accused of “terrorism” really did nothing more than meet the violence perpetrated by colonialist Britain in a strategic fashion, ultimately resulting in the peace deal (akin to autonomy) that Michael Collins signed.

Now, I am familiar with Tibetan and Buddhist communities and I realize I may be denounced as “inciting violence.” I am not doing that. I hope to incite thought about effective strategies. I would like to see real scholars of political science, international affairs, civil disobedience, and military history have roundtable discussions to decide on what type of resistance can make China budge. However, if you find me violent, I will accuse pacifists of the same. For remaining quiet, docile, and non-responsive while your countrymen are tortured, raped, and murdered is no strength, nor is it an admirable form of ahimsa. It is a form of cowardice and weakness. For example, if a man knows of a soldier who is continually raping and torturing his countrywomen, and he chooses not to act, is this a greater or lesser violence than taking a quick knife to the rapist's throat? I do not know. I only know that both acts are violent, that our world is violent, and that we must be more concerned with ascertaining the most ethical responses to brutality, than the least “violent” ones. After all, if you are Tibetan, you are already implicated in violence, whether that is the violence of pacifism or a violence of resistance. This is why most activists argue that self-immolations are “non-violent,” even though destroying the mandala of one’s own body is considered an egregious sin. Yet, the selflessness of taking that violent action for the benefit of others renders the action “non-violent.” These are mere semantics. The crucial point is that a sacrificial action will not be comfortable, and will likely result in death for one party or another. However, I can not think of a people who achieved respect, much less freedom, before they made tremendous sacrifices.

PROBLEM 3: Lack of time. Particularly in light of the trains going from China to Tibet, there is no time to waste. For a legitimate solution to the genocide in Tibet, there should be a specific timeframe for developing a course of action. For example, one year of meetings and roundtables, with progressive steps to decide and vote upon a resolution, should be sufficient. Then, the strategy should be implemented with a charted, timed expectation of results, and corresponding countermeasures if the desired effects are not achieved within that timeframe. Of course, a wholescale failure of a determined effort could result in the rapid, near extermination of the Tibetan people. However, I see no fault in rapidly achieving yourselves what the Chinese Communists will soon force upon you anyway. If the Tibetan people should die out in a legitimate struggle, at least the Tibetan nation would go down in blaze of glory, and live on in history books, instead of being slowly, insidiously, and silently removed from the world by the hands of the colonialist Communists. A quick death in pursuit of freedom would be preferable to a slow death waiting for nothing, much as a revolutionary prefers the executioner’s bullet to being gradually lynched! Time is of the essence.

Of course, since very few Tibetans are willing to admit that these three problems (magical thinking, desire for comfort, and a lack of time) coalesce to form the most formidable obstacle to freedom, I have scant hope of seeing a Free Tibet. China is a formidable opponent, and even with a strong and progressive revolutionary strategy, success is not guaranteed. For this, and more sentimental reasons, I will no longer sell any of my few books on Tibet. When I am old, and my daughters' family line is thinning out with non-Tibetan blood, I will produce these texts to teach my grandchildren about their heritage, and the marvelous nation of people that once upon a time…..were Tibetan.

Ensapa

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2012, 11:29:23 AM »
I dont know if it is the forum, or this article that was on Phayul not too long ago, but it seems that the CTA has finally taken some basic action that is not much, but at least it shows that they have taken the initiative to visit other countries to garner support from others and build up positive relations with them. It is a good step that they are taking, as it increases their exposure on things and eventually they will come to the conclusion that the very act of banning Dorje Shugden is causing them to fail in whatever peace talks they wish to engage with China and lift it.

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Tibetan minister lobbies for support in South Africa
Phayul[Friday, August 24, 2012 03:31]
DHARAMSHALA, August 24: Kalon Dicki Chhoyang, the Tibetan minister for Information and International Relations is currently in South Africa, meeting leaders and speaking on the critical situation inside Tibet.

The minister also met with representatives of different political parties for consultations and briefings on the current human rights situation in Tibet and the ongoing wave of self-immolations, which now numbers 49.

The cabinet member of the Dharamshala based Central Tibetan Administration, on her maiden visit to the African nation, held a joint press conference with the Democratic Alliance, the Congress of the People, and the Inkatha Freedom Party.

In a statement issued by Chhoyang, she called the Tibetan struggle “a people's fight for its right to exist with its own distinct cultural identity and language.”

“This includes the right to practice their religion openly and without hindrance from the State as permitted in all free countries. We are not seeking to secede from China, " Kalon Chhoyang reaffirmed.

With growing bilateral ties between South Africa and China, the Tibetan minister urged South African leaders to uphold their cherished values of human rights protection and democracy in their dealings with China.

“Therefore, the people of Tibet have great expectations that the people of South Africa may exercise moral leadership,” Kalon Chhoyang said.

She also called for greater support for the Tibetan struggle.

“In an age where we seek to resolve conflicts peacefully, the international community must stand behind these principles by supporting movements, such as the Tibetan struggle, which are firmly committed to non-violence and dialogue" states Kalon Chhoyang.

“As Tibetan areas where self-immolations took place have been closed to the international press and community, the Central Tibetan Administration encourages foreign governments and international bodies to pursue efforts to send fact-finding delegations.”

Mangosuthu Buthelezi, Member of Parliament and leader of the IFP, in a commentary said he was pleased to meet the Tibetan minister in Durban.

“I have supported this cause because I believe that the democratisation and decentralisation of China can start from Tibet,” Buthelezi said.

“But I also support Tibet because, despite the continued atrocities and human rights violations perpetrated against them, Tibetans have pursued their decades-long struggle exclusively through the methods of nonviolence, negotiations and moral high ground.”

DharmaDefender

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2012, 09:23:23 AM »
Thanks for posting that article Ensapa. Brent A Warner is an inji (Westerner)? It shows in his writing which is quite apologetic (but well-written and refreshingly honest!).

I think hes done a good job of summing up the Tibetan obstacles to independence. Its not Dorje Shugden, he never had anything to do with their political failures. It was more their total inactivity (or lack of useful activity!) in the situation, which has caused them to fail for the last 50 years, and Warner said it right - "Chatting endlessly with mid-level Chinese Communist leaders while torture, cattle-prod rapes, and political executions go unabated does not even seem very Buddhist to me." Simple method of measuring results - how have the annual March 10 protests in front of Chinese embassies had any effect?

In fact, you could say that Warner almost hints at Dorje Shugden being unfairly blamed for the Tibetan failure to regain their independence when he writes: "In brief, the magical mentality so prominent among so many older Tibetans (and many of the youth) allows the government to evade all responsibility, criticism, and to remain unaccountable for their lack of progress." Thats it, just blaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaame the deity!

Ensapa

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2012, 09:46:09 AM »
Thanks for posting that article Ensapa. Brent A Warner is an inji (Westerner)? It shows in his writing which is quite apologetic (but well-written and refreshingly honest!).

I think hes done a good job of summing up the Tibetan obstacles to independence. Its not Dorje Shugden, he never had anything to do with their political failures. It was more their total inactivity (or lack of useful activity!) in the situation, which has caused them to fail for the last 50 years, and Warner said it right - "Chatting endlessly with mid-level Chinese Communist leaders while torture, cattle-prod rapes, and political executions go unabated does not even seem very Buddhist to me." Simple method of measuring results - how have the annual March 10 protests in front of Chinese embassies had any effect?
Their failures are entirely due to their attitude towards things in general. Instead of finding solutions, they prefer to blame something for their problems or push their responsibility to someone else (like, to the Dalai Lama instead of trying to find a solution for themselves). Their consistent behavior of letting things be and blaming others have led them and their people into a state of limbo and instead of taking responsibility, they continue to blame the Chinese. There are just so many things they can do to appease the Chinese while applying Buddhist principles at the same time, but they did not do any of those.

In fact, you could say that Warner almost hints at Dorje Shugden being unfairly blamed for the Tibetan failure to regain their independence when he writes: "In brief, the magical mentality so prominent among so many older Tibetans (and many of the youth) allows the government to evade all responsibility, criticism, and to remain unaccountable for their lack of progress." Thats it, just blaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaame the deity!
It is very obvious that he is suggesting that as he discusses of the nature of the Tibetans. Everything goes hand in hand in more ways than one. Attitudes are pervasive. After all it is easier to blame something than to actually do something to rectify the problem. There's nothing wrong for the citizens to have the magical mentality, but when the central government has that mentality, things will go wrong very fast.

Dorje Shugden in more ways than one is just the scapegoat for CTA's lack of independence. However, it has now been the western tibetan buddhists' scapegoat as well, which is hilarious in more ways than one. I do wonder why would they take up even the negative qualities of the tibetan culture when those should have been left behind. CTA better changes before the 99 year lease ends.

DharmaDefender

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2012, 02:52:14 PM »
Dorje Shugden in more ways than one is just the scapegoat for CTA's lack of independence. However, it has now been the western tibetan buddhists' scapegoat as well, which is hilarious in more ways than one. I do wonder why would they take up even the negative qualities of the tibetan culture when those should have been left behind.

Ensapa, its been picked up by Western Tibetan Buddhists because its the cause du jour. Yes, its hilarious because how many serious, famous Western rangzen activists do you know of? Their all Tibetan like Tenzin Tsundue, Lhadon Thetong and whatnot. Why? Because even though a inji might devote their lives to the rangzen cause, to the Tibetans theyll always be just a pretender. And the Westerners, no matter how much they try, they werent born, bred and raised Tibetan. Theyll never 100% fully think or be like a Tibetan.

(And before anyone throws up names like Robert Thurman, those guys didnt become famous for campaigning for a Free Tibet. They became famous for being lotsawas and Buddhists or Indo-Tibetan/Sino-Tibetan scholars...and Jo Lumley didnt fight for the Tibetans, she fought for the Gurkhas!)

But all this is TOTALLY besides the point...

The reason why I think its hilarious and odd as well, is because we all have our own battles to fight. Actually, if you think about it, these external battles about war and fighting for independence and whatnot, would not exist if we all waged an internal war on our ego and our selves.

To be fair I think its hard to separate the two. For Tibetans, their culture is "Buddhism + Tibetan traditions and customs". Tradition and customs, and Buddhism have become virtually indistinguishable. And since (for the majority of the population) their practice is based on blind faith, Tibetans never need to learn what are the teachings, and what are just customs which can be abandoned.

For Westerners, its the same problem except approached differently - since we werent raised Tibetan, we cant distinguish positive customs from the negative ones. Since we cant distinguish the Tibetan customs we dont need to assume, from the Buddhist teachings we do need to practice, we end up trying to assimilate into the lot...and failing miserably in our practice because it becomes overwhelming or alien to us. I guess thats when it becomes even more imperative to have a good teacher who knows how to skilfully transmit the teachings to us, minus the customs which we will find foreign (sorry, been reading too much Daily Mail recently) and can lead us to abandon the Buddhadharma.

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CTA better changes before the 99 year lease ends.

HAHAHA fucking classic.

dsiluvu

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2012, 09:33:26 PM »
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PROBLEM 1: Magical thinking. The Tibetan people, and in particular, the Central Tibetan Administration, must abandon magical thinking. If CTA is going to follow a Middle Way policy, they owe it to the Tibetan people and the Tibet supporters to describe an efficient strategy to achieve this in a specified timeframe. After decades of “negotiations” that have failed to achieve even the slightest improvement in human rights, they owe us an honest explanation, as well as a corrective course. The current claim, namely that negotiation is the best strategy to resolve the conflict, relies on neither evidence nor logic. It draws its power from the Tibetan people’s remarkable faith in the person of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. That uniquely profound devotion should be a source of strength, yet the Tibetan government has allowed it to become their greatest weakness. Faith in His Holiness is manipulated so that Tibetan people wait endlessly, convinced that Chenrezig is their political savior and that they will somehow be saved by outside forces, or by anyone other than themselves. A more revolutionary approach, be it non-violent, or violently defensive, labels one something like a “heathen” who either does not understand Buddhism, or worse yet, has no devotion. In brief, the magical mentality so prominent among so many older Tibetans (and many of the youth) allows the government to evade all responsibility, criticism, and to remain unaccountable for their lack of progress.

Wow has this writer nailed it through their thick skulls or what!?! Honestly it is a simple truth and fact... now if my country's government were making national decisions based on a "spirit" guiding them, I don't think I'd be damn comfortable about it especially since the predictions were wrong and we're still heading no where and no progress. Something is obviously very wrong here... and the middle way idea sound like just an idea and nothing else because results is what shows, nothing else.

I am so glad to read this article and what a refreshing one indeed to hear someone actually took notice and wrote it out and I am sure it is with good intentions to highlight some very logical points the CTA definitely should not ignore. Look at the situation now... where are they at? It sure speaks volumes of the Tibetan mind set and I have to agree with the writer and yes it seems true that majority of Tibetans do not really practice what they preach... definitely not Buddhistic behaviors when you forcefully chase monks and high Lamas out of their monasteries. Definitely that is not they way to win your people over, let's not even try your so called "enemy" China. The future looks dark and bleak for these Tibetans if they keep applying the same methods that create disharmony within themselves. What would be the fruits of such actions... it is done, no way to reverse it because there is Karma and it has been recorded and will return to bite you. If CTA really cared about getting their country back.... they should start from home, by getting all Tibetans to live harmoniously without prejudice! Perhaps then we would see some progress... x

Ensapa

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2012, 01:19:03 PM »
Dorje Shugden in more ways than one is just the scapegoat for CTA's lack of independence. However, it has now been the western tibetan buddhists' scapegoat as well, which is hilarious in more ways than one. I do wonder why would they take up even the negative qualities of the tibetan culture when those should have been left behind.

Ensapa, its been picked up by Western Tibetan Buddhists because its the cause du jour. Yes, its hilarious because how many serious, famous Western rangzen activists do you know of? Their all Tibetan like Tenzin Tsundue, Lhadon Thetong and whatnot. Why? Because even though a inji might devote their lives to the rangzen cause, to the Tibetans theyll always be just a pretender. And the Westerners, no matter how much they try, they werent born, bred and raised Tibetan. Theyll never 100% fully think or be like a Tibetan.

(And before anyone throws up names like Robert Thurman, those guys didnt become famous for campaigning for a Free Tibet. They became famous for being lotsawas and Buddhists or Indo-Tibetan/Sino-Tibetan scholars...and Jo Lumley didnt fight for the Tibetans, she fought for the Gurkhas!)

But all this is TOTALLY besides the point...

The reason why I think its hilarious and odd as well, is because we all have our own battles to fight. Actually, if you think about it, these external battles about war and fighting for independence and whatnot, would not exist if we all waged an internal war on our ego and our selves.

To be fair I think its hard to separate the two. For Tibetans, their culture is "Buddhism + Tibetan traditions and customs". Tradition and customs, and Buddhism have become virtually indistinguishable. And since (for the majority of the population) their practice is based on blind faith, Tibetans never need to learn what are the teachings, and what are just customs which can be abandoned.

For Westerners, its the same problem except approached differently - since we werent raised Tibetan, we cant distinguish positive customs from the negative ones. Since we cant distinguish the Tibetan customs we dont need to assume, from the Buddhist teachings we do need to practice, we end up trying to assimilate into the lot...and failing miserably in our practice because it becomes overwhelming or alien to us. I guess thats when it becomes even more imperative to have a good teacher who knows how to skilfully transmit the teachings to us, minus the customs which we will find foreign (sorry, been reading too much Daily Mail recently) and can lead us to abandon the Buddhadharma.

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CTA better changes before the 99 year lease ends.

HAHAHA fucking classic.

Dont you just love it when injis try so painfully hard to be Tibetan that it hurts just watching them trying? Here's a post by angry tibetan girl, no less, on the phenomenon. I find it very apt and it is as if she is describing this category of people: people who try too hard to be Tibetan, or people who think that they have all the rights in this world because they are supporting the Tibetan cause. Either way, i do find it hilarious in more ways than one.

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Some #Tibet supporters & their sense of ENTITLEMENT
Don’t you fucking hate it when an enji supporter thinks they own you now that they are part of the movement? The other day one of them messaged me asking if I was you (maybe because we speak and write english?). He expected me to respond cordially to him because he’s a “Tibet supporter,” even if I didn’t really know him. I was polite for the most part and told him I wasn’t you but made it obvious that I did not want to have a long conversation. You would think he got the clue, instead the guy proceeds to randomly ask me personal question about my family members and at this point I’m thinking you’re getting too personal. By this time I’m getting visibly irritated but he continues to go after this topic even more and than accuses me for being rude for being irritated. WTF? just because you are a “Tibet supporter” doesn’t mean you can now expect to get a warm response every time you message a Tibetan, especially when they don’t know you. I, as a Tibetan, have every right to NOT talk to you if I don’t want to, even if you ARE a Tibet supporter. Respect my right as a person not wanting to talk to another person. These “Tibet supporters” (cause they are a specific kind) need to stop feeling entitled to everything Tibet/an cause they are supporters. They need to seriously check their privilege.

Woah, sorry to hear. Sounds like a douche. Seems quit a bit of people are being asked if they’re ATG. But I totally agree with this sense of entitlement.


And who can forget, Lama fetish: the fetish that tibetan Buddhist westerner has, where they are so fascinated by Tibetan Lamas that they are unable to think logically anymore:

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Is That All You Got?
Don’t you hate it when injis think that just having a photo of themselves with the Dalai Lama or Karmapa somehow gives them legitimacy and/or integrity? If I see one more inji with a photo of themselves on Facebook with a Lama or so-called prominent Tibetan I’m going to go Angry Tibetan Girl and puke. So what, you’ve weezled your way to these lamas, what else you got? I remember meeting somebody whose PhD research had been “blessed” by Samdhong Rinpoche. Don’t Tibetan Prime Ministers have anything better to do? I also attended a talk by an inji whose topic claimed to be about the Dalai Lama but in reality was slide after slide of themselves with the Dalai Lama in various places all over the world. Angry Tibetan Girl, what do you say? Please smack these injis down.

Lol. I think you already did a fine job. I’d call this Lama Fetish, its beyond Tibet.


While it is hard to blame Tibetans for being ignornant due to so many years of isolation, I find it very easy to blame westerners who do not make an effort to actually find out more and getting trapped in the cultural aspect rather than the teachings.

DharmaSpace

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2012, 04:29:53 AM »
The CTA and the Tibetans need to represent themselves correctly and well in eyes of the international community to garner the kind of support they need. They also need a Tibetan Aung San Suu Kyi, Aung San Suu Kyi even in her early days as a political leader she wanted to win the election and to take care of everyone who are withing the Burmese borders, no one is excluded.

Can the CTA also include the interests of the Dorje Shugden practitioners many of whom who are Tibetans also. They must have an all encompassing strategy, you cannot be oppressing the Tibetans one one hand and the next hand you want oppression/colonisation to be stopped for your former country?  The cause does not sync with the effects the CTA wants to create to happen.

Ensapa

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Re: "The Psychology of Tibetan Inaction (the Tortoise Gets Run Over)"
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2012, 03:40:58 AM »
Both of the articles show something: the Tibetans did not evolve or improve themselves even after they have been in exile for so long. Before Tibet was taken over by the Chinese, I can imagine that most Tibetans just live the way that they do and that they get paid for that, or that they had slaves working under them and they didint have to do much to establish name or riches, it was all already there by default. Then when they came to Dharamsala, they carried that mentality along which is why they are in this position now.