Author Topic: Stories of Talking Buddha Statues  (Read 22401 times)

Midakpa

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Re: Stories of Talking Buddha Statues
« Reply #30 on: January 02, 2014, 11:12:58 AM »
Atisha and Tara

According to Pabongkha Rinpoche, the great Atisha was able to communicate directly with Avalokiteshvara and Tara whenever he needed advice. When the Tibetan king Jangchub Oe sent representatives to invite him to Tibet, Atisha consulted Tara who told him that it would be most beneficial to sentient beings and the teachings if he went. Moreover, there would be much benefit resulting from a lay vow holder (upasaka). Atisha also checked whether going to Tibet would be a hindrance to his own lifespan. Tara said that if he did go, his life would be shortened by twenty years. Atisha did not hesitate. All he thought of was the benefits of his going to Tibet. If it meant a shorter life, then so be it! The great bodhisattva did not think of his own life at all but instead found a great sense of purpose in his going to Tibet to spread the Dharma.

Atisha promised his abbot that he would return to India after three years. At the end of three years, he had to go back to his monastery as promised. But although Atisha appeared to be preparing to leave, he was constantly on the lookout for an upasaka because Tara had previously told him that "it would be most beneficial for the teachings if you took on a great upasaka in Tibet". At this time Tara was repeatedly telling him, "The upasaka will soon be here". So Atisha waited but there was no upasaka. "My upasaka hasn't come, he said. "How could Tara lie!"

One day, Dromtonpa turned up and met Atisha in an alley. From then on, Dromtonpa served Atisha until the latter's death But before that, Atisha gave to Dromtonpa, the teaching of the stages of the path to enlightenment or Lamrim. Dromtonpa, a lay person, gave the teaching in public and handed down three lineages to his followers. The great Je Tsongkhapa took these three Kadampa lineages and combined them into one stream.


Midakpa

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Re: Stories of Talking Buddha Statues
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2014, 09:14:29 AM »
The Shakyamuni statue that spoke to Langdharma

There is a Shakyamuni statue in Phelhyeling Monastery, Nepal, that is famous for having spoken to the Tibetan king Langdharma (838-841 CE). Langdharma was the last king of the Yar Lung dynasty of Tibet. He came to power after the death of Relpachen (r. 815-836) . According to Tibetan history, he is said to have persecuted Buddhism. His anti-Buddhist activities included closing monasteries and nunneries, forcing monks and nuns to return to lay life and cutting off government aid for Buddhism. It was reported that during his reign, Langdharma ordered all statues to be destroyed unless they proved their worthiness by speaking. At that time, a Shakyamuni statue spoke directly to Langdharma and it was spared from being destroyed. This statue is still in Phelgyeling Monastery.

Big Uncle

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Re: Stories of Talking Buddha Statues
« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2014, 03:54:38 PM »
Not only Tara and Buddha statues that spoke in Tibet. There were many Lama Tsongkhapa statues that exhibited these miraculous signs. There were 8 Lama Tsongkhapa statues that were the most famous in Tibet for exhibiting miracles. Some spoked, some dissolved into light and entered the practitioner thus bestowing powerful realisations, some flew to other lands and so forth. I read them in Geshe Kelsang Gyatso's Heart Jewel book.

Midakpa

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Re: Stories of Talking Buddha Statues
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2014, 09:57:26 AM »
Atisha in the Lhasa temple

Once, Atisha, invited by rNog Legs-pa'i-ses-rab, visited the Lhasa temple. As he approached the temple, a tall man with a long beard appeared at the temple door and said, "Welcome, Oh great pandita, may thou achieve the highest success." Atisha rushed forward, but the man went inside the temple and melted into the image of Avalokiteshvara. With a deep sigh, Atisha said, "Ah, I missed Avalokiteshvara."

Midakpa

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Re: Stories of Talking Buddha Statues
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2014, 10:48:27 AM »
Atisha and Avalokiteshvara

Before Atisha went to Tibet, there were many divine predictions and inspiration. These inspired him to make the decision to go to Tibet. There was one such prediction at the temple of Amitabha in Bodhgaya. Atisha once visited this temple and the image of Avalokiteshvara suddenly spoke to him, "In the north there is a ksetra of mine and your tutelar deity Taradevi is already residing there in the cause of the living beings. A large number of people there awaits your guidance. You have got to go there and work for the living beings." Thus it was predicted by Avalokiteshvara himself that the Tibetans were to be the followers of Atisha.