Author Topic: Dalai Lama Rejected from Taiwan  (Read 7928 times)

Ensapa

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Re: Dalai Lama Rejected from Taiwan
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2012, 11:32:33 AM »
Both Karmapas have voiced out against self-immolations BUT the Dalai Lama and CTA are still not saying anything. Their silence is approval of the act which actually shows how uncaring they are to their own people due to political agendas. Seems like Dharma, the value of precious human lives are out the window. What will Tibetans represent if even the very thing they are well known for - Buddhism is thrown out the window just because of this life.

From the post: ‘I strongly wish self-immolations would stop soon’ - Karmapa Thaye Dorje
http://www.dorjeshugden.com/forum/index.php?topic=2873.msg38165#new

Quote
Karmapa urges Tibetan monks to stop self-immolation

The Guardian, Thursday 10 November 2011

The Karmapa, one of the most senior religious figures from Tibet, has urged Tibetans in China to end a spate of self-immolations and find other ways to challenge Beijing's policies.
 
Eleven monks, former monks and nuns have set fire to themselves in Sichuan, south-west China this year.

Many see the 25-year-old Karmapa as a possible successor to the Dalai Lama as the spiritual leader of exiled Tibetans. Both men have expressed deep sorrow at the deaths and blamed Chinese policies for the self-immolations.
 
But the elder man also accused China of "cultural genocide" and has not appealed to Tibetans to halt such acts.
 
The Karmapa praised the bravery and "pure motivation" of those involved, saying each case had filled his heart with pain.

"These desperate acts … are a cry against the injustice and repression under which they live," he said.
 
But he added: "I request the people of Tibet to preserve their lives and find other, constructive ways to work for the cause of Tibet."

"The situation is unbearably difficult, but in difficult situations we need greater courage and determination."
 
Drawing on both his religion and the wider challenges facing Tibetans he added: "Most of those who have died have been very young. They had a long future ahead of them, an opportunity to contribute in ways that they have now foregone. In Buddhist teaching life is precious. To achieve anything worthwhile we need to preserve our lives. We Tibetans are few in number, so every Tibetan life is of value to the cause of Tibet."



It is as if to the CTA, human life and the Dharma is not as important as their independence, and it does not matter if they sacrifice many more for their purpose. The only courage they lack is the courage to actually speak up against both the ban and the self immolations. If they lack the courage to speak out against one, they will lack the courage to do the other, and if they lack the courage to do the other, they will never be able to make the right decisions, which is the reason why CTA is still in a limbo, 50 years later.

dsiluvu

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Re: Dalai Lama Rejected from Taiwan
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2012, 11:42:55 AM »
It is very SAD to witness these tragedies and injustice happening to Tibetans while their own so called Govt just sits and watch and does not do anything. Is their EGO that big that is surpasses the many lives lost in these two situations? Both the Ban and this self - immolation is really wrong... I cannot understand why CTA is form and calls themselves a democratic govt when nothing they do is democratic at all. Many are watching and is so fully aware of this. Soon the media people will start questioning again and all the while they have been hiding behing His Holiness the Dalai Lama's skirt, all will be eventually revealed. You cannot hide or pretend nothing is wrong when the whole world can see for their own eyes and ears.

Not only does this destroy Tibet's reputation it always put at a place when after His Holiness passes, no one will bother about them any more. They are already not bothered now with all the big hoo haa campaign about Free Tibet but the impact and results is unfortunately slack. What more if there was no more Dalai Lama? Time is running out... better review your failed strategy quickly.

Ensapa

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Re: Dalai Lama Rejected from Taiwan
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2012, 12:25:54 PM »
It is very SAD to witness these tragedies and injustice happening to Tibetans while their own so called Govt just sits and watch and does not do anything. Is their EGO that big that is surpasses the many lives lost in these two situations? Both the Ban and this self - immolation is really wrong... I cannot understand why CTA is form and calls themselves a democratic govt when nothing they do is democratic at all. Many are watching and is so fully aware of this. Soon the media people will start questioning again and all the while they have been hiding behing His Holiness the Dalai Lama's skirt, all will be eventually revealed. You cannot hide or pretend nothing is wrong when the whole world can see for their own eyes and ears.

Not only does this destroy Tibet's reputation it always put at a place when after His Holiness passes, no one will bother about them any more. They are already not bothered now with all the big hoo haa campaign about Free Tibet but the impact and results is unfortunately slack. What more if there was no more Dalai Lama? Time is running out... better review your failed strategy quickly.

I wouldnt say that their ego is really big, its just that they were never made to ever take responsibility for anything at all. they just blame it on the Dalai Lama or use his name to achieve personal gains such as worldly fame and position.  They are far from democratic, and the only reason why the US and EU and 'assisting' the Tibetan cause is to hope to shred China's peace and harmony and the Tibetans are playing into their hands like simple minded fools. WAKE UP TIBET AND DONT BE SO DESPERATE TO SELL YOURSELVES OFF. Dont sell Buddhist practice off for independence.

dsiluvu

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Re: Dalai Lama Rejected from Taiwan
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2012, 01:26:45 PM »
From being Rejected in Taiwan... to being rejected indirectly in Africa too???

It looks like the more you get on China's bad side now, the more obstacles HHDL will encounter. Looking at the situation, Peace Talks with China is probably impossible now. It is time to just make amends... stop ur people from burning, at least you save lives.

Quote
South Africa acted unlawfully in failing to give Dalai Lama visa, court rules
Judge says pressure from China played part in delay that prevented Dalai Lama from attending Desmond Tutu's birthday

David Smith in Johannesburg
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 29 November 2012 18.27 GMT

The South African government acted unlawfully in failing to give the Dalai Lama an entry visa in time to attend the archbishop emeritus Desmond Tutu's 80th birthday celebrations, a court has ruled.

The supreme court of appeal's unanimous judgment strongly criticised the then home affairs minister, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, an ex-wife of the president, Jacob Zuma, and now head of the African Union.

The government was accused of banning the Dalai Lama last year because of a fear of offending China. A furious Tutu, who had invited the Tibetan spiritual leader to deliver a lecture in Cape Town, likened the African National Congress (ANC) to its racial apartheid predecessor.

The Dalai Lama and others in his entourage had applied for visas through the South African high commission office in New Delhi, India, about two months ahead of the planned visit, the court in Bloemfontein heard.

Even though the application met all requirements, the South African government did not issue the visa and the Dalai Lama ultimately withdrew his application.

"What is justified by the evidence is an inference that the matter was deliberately delayed so as to avoid a decision," the ruling by judge Robert Nugent said. "It hardly needs saying that the minister is not entitled to deliberately procrastinate. Procrastination by itself establishes unreasonable delay."

Nugent acknowledged that pressure from China, a major trading partner with South Africa, played a part in the delays. The Dalai Lama wants increased autonomy for Tibet, the homeland from which he has been exiled since 1959. China accuses him of being a separatist.

"I accept that the proposed visit raised matters of high diplomatic importance, justifiably calling for consultation, advice and consideration," the judge ruled. "But that begs the question what time was required to complete that process."

However, the judge said he did not find any evidence that officials had plans to deny the visa outright.

Tutu welcomed the court's verdict. "An independent judiciary is one of the most critical cornerstones of a democracy," he said. "This finding of our appeal court reflects positively on our judiciary and our country.

"His holiness is the holiest person I have had the fortune to meet. He has endured more than 50 years in exile. His grace, magnanimity and lack of bitterness are truly remarkable."

Tutu added: "I look forward to seeing him again soon, and perhaps I will invite him to celebrate my 90th birthday."

Opposition politicians who brought the appeal said the verdict had upheld the rule of law in South Africa. Mosiuoa Lekota, president of the Congress of the People, said: "Any citizen who wishes to invite a friend from abroad cannot be pressurised by government not to do so. It is held that justice delayed is justice denied. Likewise procrastination purposefully pursued is unconstitutional and unlawful.

"How often must our law courts remind the ruling party to honour the constitution and recognise its supremacy in our legal framework?"

He added: "In taking a position to delay the processing of the Dalai Lama visa, the government denied archbishop Desmond Tutu his constitutional right to invite his holiness."

The response from the government's home affairs department was brief. "The department has noted the judgment handed down today by the supreme court of appeal on the Dalai Lama matter," said the deputy director general Jackie Mckay. "In line with our constitution, the department respects the ruling of the supreme court in this regard."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/nov/29/south-africa-dalai-lama-visa

Ensapa

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Re: Dalai Lama Rejected from Taiwan
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2012, 04:33:25 AM »
From being Rejected in Taiwan... to being rejected indirectly in Africa too???

It looks like the more you get on China's bad side now, the more obstacles HHDL will encounter. Looking at the situation, Peace Talks with China is probably impossible now. It is time to just make amends... stop ur people from burning, at least you save lives.

Quote
South Africa acted unlawfully in failing to give Dalai Lama visa, court rules
Judge says pressure from China played part in delay that prevented Dalai Lama from attending Desmond Tutu's birthday

David Smith in Johannesburg
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 29 November 2012 18.27 GMT

The South African government acted unlawfully in failing to give the Dalai Lama an entry visa in time to attend the archbishop emeritus Desmond Tutu's 80th birthday celebrations, a court has ruled.

The supreme court of appeal's unanimous judgment strongly criticised the then home affairs minister, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, an ex-wife of the president, Jacob Zuma, and now head of the African Union.

The government was accused of banning the Dalai Lama last year because of a fear of offending China. A furious Tutu, who had invited the Tibetan spiritual leader to deliver a lecture in Cape Town, likened the African National Congress (ANC) to its racial apartheid predecessor.

The Dalai Lama and others in his entourage had applied for visas through the South African high commission office in New Delhi, India, about two months ahead of the planned visit, the court in Bloemfontein heard.

Even though the application met all requirements, the South African government did not issue the visa and the Dalai Lama ultimately withdrew his application.

"What is justified by the evidence is an inference that the matter was deliberately delayed so as to avoid a decision," the ruling by judge Robert Nugent said. "It hardly needs saying that the minister is not entitled to deliberately procrastinate. Procrastination by itself establishes unreasonable delay."

Nugent acknowledged that pressure from China, a major trading partner with South Africa, played a part in the delays. The Dalai Lama wants increased autonomy for Tibet, the homeland from which he has been exiled since 1959. China accuses him of being a separatist.

"I accept that the proposed visit raised matters of high diplomatic importance, justifiably calling for consultation, advice and consideration," the judge ruled. "But that begs the question what time was required to complete that process."

However, the judge said he did not find any evidence that officials had plans to deny the visa outright.

Tutu welcomed the court's verdict. "An independent judiciary is one of the most critical cornerstones of a democracy," he said. "This finding of our appeal court reflects positively on our judiciary and our country.

"His holiness is the holiest person I have had the fortune to meet. He has endured more than 50 years in exile. His grace, magnanimity and lack of bitterness are truly remarkable."

Tutu added: "I look forward to seeing him again soon, and perhaps I will invite him to celebrate my 90th birthday."

Opposition politicians who brought the appeal said the verdict had upheld the rule of law in South Africa. Mosiuoa Lekota, president of the Congress of the People, said: "Any citizen who wishes to invite a friend from abroad cannot be pressurised by government not to do so. It is held that justice delayed is justice denied. Likewise procrastination purposefully pursued is unconstitutional and unlawful.

"How often must our law courts remind the ruling party to honour the constitution and recognise its supremacy in our legal framework?"

He added: "In taking a position to delay the processing of the Dalai Lama visa, the government denied archbishop Desmond Tutu his constitutional right to invite his holiness."

The response from the government's home affairs department was brief. "The department has noted the judgment handed down today by the supreme court of appeal on the Dalai Lama matter," said the deputy director general Jackie Mckay. "In line with our constitution, the department respects the ruling of the supreme court in this regard."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/nov/29/south-africa-dalai-lama-visa



Looks like things are not looking that rosy for the Dalai Lama after all. His influence and power over the secular leaders is waning at a very fast rate and what does that mean for the Tibetans? even less support for their Tibetan independence movement. When the Dalai Lama was popular, they should have produced art or literature, or at least something that they could give back to the world and make the world say "oh wow Tibet is indeed a nation worth saving!" but since they did not, the world just dosent respect the Dalai Lama like they used to, thus today's results...