Author Topic: Compassion of a Theravadan monk  (Read 7520 times)

Ensapa

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Compassion of a Theravadan monk
« on: July 06, 2012, 11:50:06 AM »
To help us dissolve our wrong view that theravardans do not have bodhicitta, I would like to share this story with you. It is said that every path that the Buddha taught is complete and perfect and can lead to happiness. Even if the theravardans limit themselves to a certain set of teachings, compassion still does arise so it is wrong to say and assume that they do not have compassion and it contradicts directly with the Bodhisattva vow of viewing the theravarda as inferior.

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Unconditional Compassion
by Samangie WETTIMUNY, Lanka Daily News, Published on the Buddhist Channel, June 23, 2012
Colombo, Sri Lanka -- Who is to be held responsible if an aged member of the Sangha, discharged from a government hospital, seeks shelter in the nearby bus stand for several days not knowing where to turn to? Is it the Buddhist laymen of the country, or the disciples of the aged monk? All should share the disgrace, I believe.
<< Ven. Modarawane Amilasiri Thera nursing an ailing monk

But is it of any use to point fingers at others when what should be done is to rise to the occasion and reach out to the needy? This is the very thought that would have crossed the mind of Ven.Maderawane Amilasiri Thera of the Sri Bodhirukkharamaya, Wellawa, Polgahawela when his eyes accidentally fell on the aged monk who was lying in a critical condition at a bus stand in the Kurunegala town on January 20, 2004.

“As I spoke to the Thera I understood that he had been lying there for several days. He was from Galewela. With great difficulty he had managed to come to the bus stand and his feeble physical condition had made him stay there until I found him. His disciples had dropped him to the hospital, but had not returned to take him back. I decided to take him to our temple and look after him.” Amilasiri Thera recollected the incident which inspired him to establish the Amilasiri Centre for the Aged Monks which is located in the temple premises.


 The very next day the Thera visited the Kurunegala hospital and told the staff that he is ready to accept aged monks after their discharge if there is nobody to accept them.
Five monks were sent to the centre on the same day. Since that day Amilasiri Thera is engaged in the noble mission of looking after the sick monks who have no where to turn to at their old age.

The Amilasiri Centre for the Aged Monks which is located in the premises of Sri Bodhirukkharamaya, Wellawa, Polgahhawela, today provides shelter to 35 aged Bhikkhus who come from different parts of the country. Though the drive to the temple, which is situated on an elevated land is not easy, the place is surrounded by lush greenery and the serene environment is ideal for the aged monks. However the difficult drive sometimes makes the lives of these ailing monks tedious as it is not so easy for vehicles to reach the place in an emergency to rush them to the hospital.

As children we have heard the story of Puthigaththa Tissa Thera who was nursed by the Buddha when he was lying in his Kuti in a critical condition at the Jethavanarama. “He who attends to the sick, attends to me” said the Buddha emphasising the importance of looking after the sick. Amilasiri Thera, a disciple of the Buddha in the true sense of the word, is fully devoted to these sick monks who seek his assistance throughout the day.

“Three monks have to be fed and some are bedridden and they need full time attention.” It is with great compassion and sympathy that Amilasiri Thera nurses the sick monks who stay in the four wards which are at the temple premises. There are twenty three Sameneras (Novice Monks) in the temple and they help the Thera for preparing Dahna (alms) for the monks and collect firewood cadjan leaves, and coconuts from the temple backyard. The way the Sameneras help the noble mission of Amilasiri Thera is praiseworthy. Amidst all this work and financial difficulties, these Sameneras continue with their Pirivena education as well.

During the early days of its establishment the Thera had to go on alms rounds along with the other monks to collect food for these ailing monks. “The support of the villagers was immense.”said the Thera. But as the number of aged monks increased and also because the type of food required by each monk differ due to their medical conditions, now food is generally prepared in the temple premises by Amilasiri Thera with the support of the Samaneras. “We also get Dhanas on certain days. What we mostly get as donations are dry rations.” No vehicles are owned by the temple to take the sick monks to the hospital. “There is only one trishaw owned by a village boy who rises to the occasion at a considerable rate and helps us out.”

The Thera’s extraordinary compassion towards humanity was appreciated at the Viru Jana Weera award ceremony in June, 2011 where he was awarded with Viru Jana Weera award for donating a kidney to a needy patient by risking his own life. The donation was made to a 22- year old newly married Catholic girl in 2005.

“In two earlier instances I was planning to donate a kidney. But both patients died. My name was registered in the Kandy Hospital donators’ list, so they came looking for me when this girl was in need of a kidney.’

Today she is a mother of two. When asked whether he has any contacts with that family he said that he had asked them not to visit him and that his sole expectation was to give someone else a chance to live. He does not want anything beyond that.

Amilasiri Thera was born as the fifth child in a family of eight. In 1988 he entered the Order at the age of fifteen under Malambe Madurasiri Nayake Thera of the Homagama , Dampe Sri Bodhiwardhanarama. His father Peter Weeresinghe of Embilipitiya, Modarawana passed away three months back at the age of 83. As a grateful son he never forgot to spare a few hours from his busy life to visit his sick father. His mother Misilin Nona is seventy three years old.

Since its establishment in 2004, 40 theras have gone back to their respective temples after curing themselves completely. Twenty six Theras have succumbed to old age and died at the centre.

None of the disciples of Hanguranketha Pungnasara Thera who is taking treatment at the Centre has any contact with him. His only aide is Amilasiri Thera. Pungnasara Thera has been staying here for one year. Handapangoda Sandasiri Thera has been staying at the centre for the past one and half years and is taking treatment for a leg ailment. “Very rarely do the Dayakes call me to inquire about my health.” He said. The stories of the other 33 Theras including the Panawela Gnana Keerthi Thera , Wathuragama Siri Sumana Thera, and Kirama Ananda Thera are more or less the same.

However the most tragic is the story of Thrikunamale Nandasara Thera who was dumped at the Kurunegala hospital by his own driver on whom he had immense trust. According to Amilasiri Thera the driver had been in the habit of handling the Thera’s bank pass books and had access to his money. Once the thera got critically ill he had admitted the thera to the Kurunegala Hospital. “Then he sold the Thera’s car and took his belongings and fled the area.” Today Amilasiri Thera is the sole guardian of Thrikunamale Nandasara Thera. He is completely bed-ridden requiring constant attention.

According to Amilasiri Thera the long- stay in the wards have made most of these theras mentally weak. “Not all are bed ridden. There are monks who can walk around and get their things done. What they want are separate rooms so that they are more free and happy.”

“The free land adjacent to the temple premises is owned by somebody else. Unfortunately the well is also situated there.” If this piece of land could be bought by the temple that will be of immense benefit to these sick monks. “ That land could be used to build a hall where these monks can stay more freely. Confining themselves to beds forever make them mentally weak” the Thera said. In a culture where we had an extended family system which had all the facilities to look after the aged , ‘elders home’ was a remote concept. It is certainly not a concept we should promote. However the truth is so bitter that if these places do not exist most of the elders have to undergo immense suffering at their old age.

The same plight awaits the aged monks if their Dayakes (patrons) and disciples shy stay away from their responsibility. People with golden hearts cannot wait until those who are responsible reach to help their ‘loved ones.’, what they can do is to strengthen the hands of noble people who are ready to accept those who are in distress with open arms for the sheer compassion for humanity.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2012, 04:11:05 PM by Big Uncle »

Poonlarp

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2012, 06:37:08 PM »
Thank you Ensapa for the inspiring story!!Yes I agree with you that the essence of Buddha teaching is within all types and schools of Buddhism.

Especially the kidney donation part, I am so amazed by his level of compassion!

But I have a question regarding the organ donation. Just like the case of Thera, if his healthy body can help more beings, donating an organ will make his body weaker therefore will cut down the help that he could give, does this consider not wise to do? One should take care of their own first before giving help, is that true?

Ensapa

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2012, 12:20:50 PM »
Thank you Ensapa for the inspiring story!!Yes I agree with you that the essence of Buddha teaching is within all types and schools of Buddhism.

Especially the kidney donation part, I am so amazed by his level of compassion!

But I have a question regarding the organ donation. Just like the case of Thera, if his healthy body can help more beings, donating an organ will make his body weaker therefore will cut down the help that he could give, does this consider not wise to do? One should take care of their own first before giving help, is that true?

It is true to an extent that if his healthy body can help more beings, donating an organ will make his body weaker therefore will cut down the help that he could give, but this is also a measure of his practice of compassion. This brings in mind the story of when Shakyamuni was still a bodhisattva, he fed himself to the starving lioness just so that the cubs wont die. The monk giving away a portion of his body is more or less inspired and the same as that body. However, it could also be the case that he is unable to benefit other beings just as much if he were to have a fully functioning body at the expense of the girl, so at the end he can benefit more by donating a part of his body. This is a direct and very powerful teaching as it sets an example to others and inspires others that the Buddha's teaching is actually practical and it is possible to be selfless. This way, more people can benefit and learn directly as a result of his brave act. So this shows that the teachings and perfection of compassion is not only exclusive to the Mahayana, but it is also common in all traditions.

This article belongs in this forum as it helps all of us open up our perspectives to what Buddhism is and how the other traditions are faring. We may be Dorje Shugden practitioners, but we are still Buddhists, supporters and followers of Shakyamuni and Dorje Shugden as a Dharma protector so he naturally protects anything that is related to Buddhism and it is good for us to learn up on the other traditions and also to show that Dorje Shugden practitioners respect all, but we only follow one lineage as that helps us focus. At the same time, knowing what is going on in other lineages helps reaffirm our faith in ours.

bambi

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2012, 11:34:32 AM »
Oh my! How sad that those monks are abandoned while they are old and sick. How could the younger monks do that? Unbelievable! Venerable Thera is such an inspiring person to many. From taking care of the ill and old to the part where He donated his kidney to a girl from another religion. He didn't even want credit for it. I am ashamed that I don't even take good care of my grandmother. The worse part is when my aunts and uncles scream at her for being slow. I always tell them to be more patient and kind for they too will get old.
Even though some of the monks are old but if they are able to move around they do so themselves which is good as well because they do not want to burden others. Thank you so much for this post. It was truly an eye opener.

Jessie Fong

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2012, 11:52:46 AM »
When we were young, we were taught to take care of the elders and ageing.

To even think that the Sangha could bring themselves to abandon their own kind?  How could they represent the holy community when they act in this way?  How could they be an inspiration if they act like this?

But the blame (if any) should not be directed to the Sangha for it seems the old monk had been at the bus stop for days already before Ven. Thera chanced upon him.  Passers-by did not lift a finger to help him.

What a sad world this is.

dondrup

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2012, 01:13:15 PM »
Compassion is practised at all schools of Buddhism.  The object of the practice of compassion is for own self, another person or up to the level of all sentient beings. Ven.Maderawane Amilasiri Thera is a living example of the practice of compassion for many others. Ven. Maderawane helped the homeless and aged monks providing them with shelter, food, love, care and attention.   He even risked his life donating one of his own kidneys to help a 22-year-old Catholic girl.    Ven. Maderawane is totally selfless! Ven. Maderawane has Mahayana motivation in his practices even though he is a Theravadan monk.

Benny

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2012, 03:40:21 PM »
Please excuse my ignorance Ensapa , why do you say "to dispel our thought that Theravadans does not have Boddhicitta.... " ? Why I have always believed that all sects of Buddhism has emphasised on compassion ? Are Theravadans known to be not compassionate ? Sad to say that really sounds like there is a huge difference between the different schools of buddhism.

I sincerely hope that this is not the case as we have seen in this article. I guess it is really not in the particular "type" Buddhism but more about the practitioner rather. Just look at how Vajrayana monks and nuns behave in enforcing the ban on Dorje Shugden, they commit horrible acts against fellow Tibetan Sangha as well as on lay Tibetan communities in exile, whilst they claim to be Vajrayana Buddhist loyal to His Holiness the Dalai Lama.   

kurava

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2012, 03:21:40 AM »
Compassion is being taught in all the 3 vehicles of Buddhism.

It is said clearly in the Lamrim text that all the 3 schools are inter linked and are  necessary progressions of one to the other.

Understanding that one must realize the unsatisfactory state of samsara and the importance of developing the spontaneous wish to renounce is the emphasis of the Theravardan school , self liberation seem like the main practice of this school. However, before one can have this wish for self liberation, one must first develop compassion for oneself. Therefore compassion is definitely  an important part of the Theravardan school. In their daily practice, Theravardan monks have engaged in numerous community activities eg. hospitals, orphanages , schools etc  to care for others

Unfortunately, the emphasis on personal self liberation does mislead the public into thinking compassion teaching is lacking in the Theravardan school which is not true.

Benny, you are right to point this out. I hope this misunderstanding is dispelled as in essence there is really no huge difference between the different schools of Buddhism. Compassion and wisdom are always the 2 main focuses of all the 3 schools.

vajrastorm

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2012, 09:09:09 AM »
This is such a lovely story of the care and compassion of Ven Modarawane Amilasari Thera who set up the Amilasari Center in Colombo for the aged monks who had been abandoned by their disciples and sponsors. His compassion extended to include the donation of an organ!

Compassion is not only practiced by Buddhists but by people of other faiths and even by people with no faith. However,compassion in the Mahayana tradition rises to the level of wanting to become enlightened so as to be able to bring all other sentient beings to that state of enlightenment too. So a Mahayana Buddhist aspires to become a Bodhisattva and has to tread Ten Grounds to become one .

pgdharma

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2012, 02:39:45 PM »
Compassion is not only practiced in Buddhism but in all religion. Ven.Maderawane Amilasiri Thera is an inspiration to many. Not only did he notice and help this old monk but from there he also started a shelter and engaged in the noble mission of looking after the sick monks who have no where to turn to at their old age.

It is so sad to know that this old aged monk was abandoned and left lying on the bus stand and no passer by even bothered to take a look or help the old monk. Who would imagine that the sangha community can even neglect and abandon their own people.

Ensapa

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Re: Compassion of a Theravardan monk
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2012, 03:45:43 PM »
This story actually mirrors that of the Buddha's when he was tending a sick monk with his own bare hands. That monk's name was Tissa, and it is said that he had boils festering from his skin and he was covered with pus and his own feces and urine. It was so putrid that nobody dared to go near him so the Buddha himself tended to him and cleaned and wiped his body personally. It is a very strong message and lesson for all of us to take care of our fellow Dharma brothers and sisters when they are sick and not abandon them.

Quote
BUDDHA TENDING TO SICK AND ILL
Putigatta - Tissa Thera

The duty of tending the sick and ill has been highly valued and praised by the Buddha.

On one occasion the Buddha was delivering a sermon to an assembly of monks, bhikkhunes (nuns), upasakas and upasikas.

That day a householder of Savatthi was listening to this Dharma sermon. He realized that the household life was full of difficulties and that the life of a monk is peaceful. He subsequently entered the Buddha's Order and later received higher ordination too.

In the course of time, the ill-effects of a past evil action of killing, came to effect him. An eruption covered his whole body with small and large blisters, which finally burst open, making his whole body full of oozing sores. As a result of this he became known as Putigatta-Tissa Thera.

As his condition became worse, be was left to himself without anyone to attend on him. His robes became wet with the pus and blood oozing from his sores. They became attached to the body and difficult to be removed and Tissa became helpless, without anybody to tend on him.

One day the Buddha was surveying the world in the early hours of the day, with his Buddha vision. His divine eye saw the plight Putigatta-Tissa thera has fallen into. He saw further that he was destined to became an arahat.

Although surgical transplants are performed in modern times, they
The Buddha, realising that he should come to his help, left his fragrant chamber (gandhakuti) to arrive at the vihara where Putigalta-Tissa thera lay forlorn.

Having come, the Buddha filled a vessel full of water, and kept it on the fire. When the water became sufficiently hot the Buddha desired to take the vessel of water up to the bed where Putigatta-Tissa tbera lay. When the monks saw the intention of the Buddha, they volunteered to carry the bed in which thera Tissa lay to where the vessel of water was.

Then the Buddha got a vessel filled with water and the sick illness thera's robes were washed and cleaned in it. The robes were carefully removed from the body, and being washed, were left out to dry in the open.

The Buddha next washed, and cleaned the body of the sick illness thera with warm water, and finally got him to wear his robes when they were sufficiently dry to be worn.


http://www.knowbuddhism.info/2009/03/buddha-and-tending-sick-and-ill.html

Big Uncle

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Re: Compassion of a Theravadan monk
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2012, 04:24:11 PM »
This story actually mirrors that of the Buddha's when he was tending a sick monk with his own bare hands. That monk's name was Tissa, and it is said that he had boils festering from his skin and he was covered with pus and his own feces and urine. It was so putrid that nobody dared to go near him so the Buddha himself tended to him and cleaned and wiped his body personally. It is a very strong message and lesson for all of us to take care of our fellow Dharma brothers and sisters when they are sick and not abandon them.

Quote
BUDDHA TENDING TO SICK AND ILL
Putigatta - Tissa Thera

The duty of tending the sick and ill has been highly valued and praised by the Buddha.

On one occasion the Buddha was delivering a sermon to an assembly of monks, bhikkhunes (nuns), upasakas and upasikas.

That day a householder of Savatthi was listening to this Dharma sermon. He realized that the household life was full of difficulties and that the life of a monk is peaceful. He subsequently entered the Buddha's Order and later received higher ordination too.

In the course of time, the ill-effects of a past evil action of killing, came to effect him. An eruption covered his whole body with small and large blisters, which finally burst open, making his whole body full of oozing sores. As a result of this he became known as Putigatta-Tissa Thera.

As his condition became worse, be was left to himself without anyone to attend on him. His robes became wet with the pus and blood oozing from his sores. They became attached to the body and difficult to be removed and Tissa became helpless, without anybody to tend on him.

One day the Buddha was surveying the world in the early hours of the day, with his Buddha vision. His divine eye saw the plight Putigatta-Tissa thera has fallen into. He saw further that he was destined to became an arahat.

Although surgical transplants are performed in modern times, they
The Buddha, realising that he should come to his help, left his fragrant chamber (gandhakuti) to arrive at the vihara where Putigalta-Tissa thera lay forlorn.

Having come, the Buddha filled a vessel full of water, and kept it on the fire. When the water became sufficiently hot the Buddha desired to take the vessel of water up to the bed where Putigatta-Tissa tbera lay. When the monks saw the intention of the Buddha, they volunteered to carry the bed in which thera Tissa lay to where the vessel of water was.

Then the Buddha got a vessel filled with water and the sick illness thera's robes were washed and cleaned in it. The robes were carefully removed from the body, and being washed, were left out to dry in the open.

The Buddha next washed, and cleaned the body of the sick illness thera with warm water, and finally got him to wear his robes when they were sufficiently dry to be worn.


http://www.knowbuddhism.info/2009/03/buddha-and-tending-sick-and-ill.html


That is just so beautiful that the Buddha set a powerful example for all of us to follow. We must always take care of the elderly and the sickly. It is our duty as good Buddhists and especially when we call ourselves Mahayanists, that we should tend to the sick and elderly. I think it is only ethical that we do so and it is really not about being spiritual because people who are sick and elderly really have no choice and all they have got is you.

Anyway, this story is beautiful because these beautiful monks have broken away with general perception and shown us that being monks is not just about willful detachment from others. I think such monks have truly taken their monastic vows and vocation to heart and are exemplary monks. They are true monks because they didn't allow what was expected of them to hinder an act of compassion or an act of loving kindness. 

dsiluvu

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Re: Compassion of a Theravadan monk
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2012, 08:50:42 AM »
This story actually mirrors that of the Buddha's when he was tending a sick monk with his own bare hands. That monk's name was Tissa, and it is said that he had boils festering from his skin and he was covered with pus and his own feces and urine. It was so putrid that nobody dared to go near him so the Buddha himself tended to him and cleaned and wiped his body personally. It is a very strong message and lesson for all of us to take care of our fellow Dharma brothers and sisters when they are sick and not abandon them.

Quote
BUDDHA TENDING TO SICK AND ILL
Putigatta - Tissa Thera

The duty of tending the sick and ill has been highly valued and praised by the Buddha.

On one occasion the Buddha was delivering a sermon to an assembly of monks, bhikkhunes (nuns), upasakas and upasikas.

That day a householder of Savatthi was listening to this Dharma sermon. He realized that the household life was full of difficulties and that the life of a monk is peaceful. He subsequently entered the Buddha's Order and later received higher ordination too.

In the course of time, the ill-effects of a past evil action of killing, came to effect him. An eruption covered his whole body with small and large blisters, which finally burst open, making his whole body full of oozing sores. As a result of this he became known as Putigatta-Tissa Thera.

As his condition became worse, be was left to himself without anyone to attend on him. His robes became wet with the pus and blood oozing from his sores. They became attached to the body and difficult to be removed and Tissa became helpless, without anybody to tend on him.

One day the Buddha was surveying the world in the early hours of the day, with his Buddha vision. His divine eye saw the plight Putigatta-Tissa thera has fallen into. He saw further that he was destined to became an arahat.

Although surgical transplants are performed in modern times, they
The Buddha, realising that he should come to his help, left his fragrant chamber (gandhakuti) to arrive at the vihara where Putigalta-Tissa thera lay forlorn.

Having come, the Buddha filled a vessel full of water, and kept it on the fire. When the water became sufficiently hot the Buddha desired to take the vessel of water up to the bed where Putigatta-Tissa tbera lay. When the monks saw the intention of the Buddha, they volunteered to carry the bed in which thera Tissa lay to where the vessel of water was.

Then the Buddha got a vessel filled with water and the sick illness thera's robes were washed and cleaned in it. The robes were carefully removed from the body, and being washed, were left out to dry in the open.

The Buddha next washed, and cleaned the body of the sick illness thera with warm water, and finally got him to wear his robes when they were sufficiently dry to be worn.


http://www.knowbuddhism.info/2009/03/buddha-and-tending-sick-and-ill.html


That is just so beautiful that the Buddha set a powerful example for all of us to follow. We must always take care of the elderly and the sickly. It is our duty as good Buddhists and especially when we call ourselves Mahayanists, that we should tend to the sick and elderly. I think it is only ethical that we do so and it is really not about being spiritual because people who are sick and elderly really have no choice and all they have got is you.

Anyway, this story is beautiful because these beautiful monks have broken away with general perception and shown us that being monks is not just about willful detachment from others. I think such monks have truly taken their monastic vows and vocation to heart and are exemplary monks. They are true monks because they didn't allow what was expected of them to hinder an act of compassion or an act of loving kindness.

ilikeshugden

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Re: Compassion of a Theravadan monk
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2012, 12:57:07 PM »
Thank you Ensapa for sharing this inspirational story! I completely agree with you when you say that the essence of Buddha teaching is within all types and schools of Buddhism including Theravadan Buddhism. Initially, i though that Theravadan Buddhism was all meditation. Now, I am proved to be wrong! This is such a lovely story of the care and compassion of Ven Modarawane Amilasari Thera who set up the Amilasari Center in Colombo for the aged monks who had been abandoned by their disciples and sponsors. His compassion extended to include the donation of an organ!I rejoice!

Ensapa

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Re: Compassion of a Theravadan monk
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2012, 04:52:38 PM »
Thank you Ensapa for sharing this inspirational story! I completely agree with you when you say that the essence of Buddha teaching is within all types and schools of Buddhism including Theravadan Buddhism. Initially, i though that Theravadan Buddhism was all meditation. Now, I am proved to be wrong! This is such a lovely story of the care and compassion of Ven Modarawane Amilasari Thera who set up the Amilasari Center in Colombo for the aged monks who had been abandoned by their disciples and sponsors. His compassion extended to include the donation of an organ!I rejoice!

Yeah, that is the general perception of mahayana practitioners towards the theravardans. Yes it is true that theravardans do not emphasize on wisdom or compassion, but that does not mean that they lack those teachings. It is just that they do not emphasize on the path of self liberation as some people may find caring for so many people or facing themselves too overwhelming. It would not be compassionate to force people who are unable to cope with so much dharma, or teachings that are too complex or require too much effort down their throats even though it is good for them as perhaps, their minds are not ready, or that they are already too overwhelmed by their suffering so they really cannot focus elsewhere. Its not that they are wrong, but perhaps, at this time, this is their capacity therefore they are unable to focus on the more extensive teachings on wisdom and compassion. Nothing wrong with that as the Buddha's teaching seeks to benefit all and therefore there is no reason for us to discriminate against teachings and the different yanas. Some of us might lack exposure of other traditions, and as such we do not understand the dynamics that go in between.

This post is meant to be the eye opener in more ways than one, to remind us that all of the Buddha's teachings are one and the same.