Author Topic: Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct  (Read 3352 times)

Ensapa

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Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
« on: October 12, 2012, 05:14:23 PM »
And China is at it again! they're building yet another Chinese temple! Why not taoist or Confucian temples? Why must it be Buddhist? could it be that China is changing from Communist to Buddhist? In any case, let us rejoice (although it would probably just be another tourist temple, but still it plants imprints!)

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Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
Updated: 14 Sep 2012



According to the construction department of the Tong’an District, the main part of the Meishan Park project--the Buddhist cultural square will be completed by the end of October, reported Haixi Morning News.

According to the report, the Meishan Park project will connect Fantian Temple and Meishan Temple scenic area to form a Buddhist cultural belt in Tong’an District. The main construction projects include the south entrance plaza, waterfront landscape and a Buddhist cultural square.

The first Straits Buddhist Cultural Festival will be held in Meishan Park upon the completion of the project.
 

Tenzin K

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Re: Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2012, 03:50:52 AM »
Four years ago, eight senior monks, clad in scarlet-and-saffron-robes, filed in front of a golden Buddha and began chanting on stage in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou. It marked an important turning point in

China's attitude toward religion.
This was the first World Buddhist Forum, attended by more than 1,000 monks, and held in China. Never before had the officially atheist country sponsored such a large religious conference.

The moment signaled Beijing's new proactive approach to religion and, in particular, its support for Buddhism, possibly as a counterweight to the explosion of Christianity in China.

Tensions still remain in Beijing's relationship to Tibetan Buddhism, particularly given believers' loyalty to their exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama. He is viewed by the Chinese government as a "splittist," with the aim of dividing China.

But Chinese Buddhism is not seen to be politically problematic in this way.
Some academics estimate there are 20 million Buddhists in China, and Buddhism has been at the forefront of the changing role of religious institutions, particularly when it comes to charity. 

Academics such as Laliberte believe Beijing is also supporting Buddhism for another reason: to counterbalance the explosion of Christianity in China.

China's communist leaders are mobilizing all resources — including Buddhists — to build a "harmonious society," their latest watchword. As people grow richer, the temples are becoming more like multinational corporations, with their balance-sheets ballooning.

Their contributions to government coffers may not yet be huge, but they will surely increase over time. And China's pragmatic leaders are making sure the government is benefiting from the economic effects of this religious revival.

brian

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Re: Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2012, 10:14:21 AM »
I think China is trying to create a centre for Buddhist practitioners with the aim to promote tourism and also religious practice. After so many years of religious practice ban on its people, China is finally making the first step towards building a religion practice hub (especially for Buddhism) because i presume is to also promote the China elected Panchen Lama so that by the time the 14th Dalai Lama passes on, this Panchen Lama will take over with many Buddhist temples in place in China. And by then, the ban of Lord Shugden would have been lifted and flourish across the world!

Klein

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Re: Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2012, 07:16:41 PM »
I am not surprised that China is building more Buddhist temples. It makes sense as Buddhism used to be the main religion for many centuries.  A big part of Chinese mentality and culture is influenced by Buddhism.

In a political point of view, what "brian" wrote made a lot of sense. In addition to that, I've heard that the Abbots of the temples and monasteries in China are appointed by the Chinese Government. In this way, the Government has full control of any potential social unrest. This is China's biggest fear. Any form of social unrest is not acceptable hence the ban on HHDL.

Religion is also one of the most effective way to control people.

kris

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Re: Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2012, 10:58:31 AM »
Since the communist time, religion is pretty much suppressed, and since China has been opened to materialism, the change is too drastic and people are very much drawn towards making money and enjoying themselves.

Religion is very much needed in China because spirituality is not strong at all, especially in the younger generation.

Buddhism in China has a long long history, and people are can accept it very easily. I rejoice with the building of new temples as well as restoring temples in China.

I agree with what Ensapa said that it may be just a tourist place, but we still need to start somewhere. I also particularly like the Buddhist theme park in Wu Xi near Shanghai: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Buddha_at_Ling_Shan

fruven

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Re: Tong'an Buddhist cultural square to be completed in Oct
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2012, 09:19:54 PM »
Rejoice in the good works of others. It is a possible shift of mentality, more openness to accepting others. Buddhism has long history in China thus it is easier to go back to the roots so to speak. How can Buddhism become bigger China? By others Buddhist country practicing it and showing results. When the results speak for themselves naturally China would be more inclined to become serious in practicing it as well.